Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

I Just Watched...


speedracer5
 Share

Recommended Posts

6 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

Been watching the Beyond Blaxploitation collection on the Criterion Channel this past week.  Four films I've watched so far are:

Trick Baby (1972)

Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song (1971) Mentioned in a previous post.

Across 110th Street (1972)

Black Belt Jones (1974)

I've enjoyed all of them so far but my favorite in this bunch is Across 110th Street with an older Anthony Quinn.  Part noir with some violent and bloody scenes, memorable ending and great soundtrack.

I'm not well versed with this genre and i'm wondering if these are 'beyond' blaxploitation, if they are somewhat outliers of it.  If anyone has recommendations for great blaxploitation films beyond the Shaft series, Superfly and Cleopatra Jones, i'm all ears.

Check some of those on this list

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Marlo Thomas, pre-rhinoplasty, can be seen in the Thriller episode "The Ordeal of Dr. Cordell." 

Whatta difference a nose job makes . . .

The Ordeal of Dr. Cordell

cm-capture-791.gif

cm-capture-70.gif

cm-capture-83.gif

cm-capture-901.gif?resize=490,370

 

Antenna TV started running the Joey Bishop Show a few years back.  I had never seen it.  It's one of the few TV shows that went from B&W to color, and then back to B&W (when it moved from NBC to CBS).   It also changed basic premises almost as much as Doris Day's sitcom did.  Anyway, Marlo Thomas played Bishop's sister in the first season.

I didn't even recognize her when I watched it.  I never knew it was her, until I looked up the credits on IMDb.

Son of a Gun (or Danny Thomas): A Look at THE JOEY BISHOP SHOW | THAT'S  ENTERTAINMENT!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A couple of evenings ago I watched 1962's A TASTE OF HONEY. I had heard the Herb Albert version of the theme song all my life & was reticent to watch the film, fearing I'd get the tune stick in my head-a big reason why I'll never watch "A Summer Place".

But for some reason I decided to check out the Criterion release from my library. I had no idea what the story was about, so the entire thing took me by surprise-even the fact it was British & in black & white.

It's the story of a young girl who lives with her Mother & about to graduate from high school. The girl is rather awkward and her Mom is a sort of tart. The story takes place in a poor section of London and the gritty locations absolutely add much to the story.

The girl, Jo has an odd perspective on love & relationships, after observing her Mother's behaviour with men. Jo meets a sweet boy who cooks on a merchant ship and they have a romance until he is shipped off.  Mother announces she's going to be married and "it all works out- you're leaving to be on your own after graduation anyway." Cold.

Jo does try living on her own and by chance meets another boy, this one is gay. One of my favorite lines in this movie was when she inquires out of curiosity, "what is it you DO with other men?" His response sets the character's dignity & personality and you see the two develop a sweet relationship based on mutual respect & kindness.

The story seemed kind of uneventful as I watched it, but now a few days later, I keep thinking about the charactors. I spent a LOT of time watching the backgrounds, especially the Blackpool Fair, close fenced streets, grade school yard and rubble filled empty lots-presumably war scars. I've always liked this type of film where you are immersed in another culture & place, in another era-it's like time travel.

All principle players were excellent-special kudos go to Dora Bryan who plays the Mother to perfection with enough pathos to make us sympathize with her, even if we don't like her much. 

I thoroughly enjoyed this movie, although today it may seem kind of routine with stereotypes. Homosexuality, promiscuity poverty & racism are all part of this story, portrayed with unusual kindness & acceptance for 1962.

A-Taste-of-Honey-1961-by-Tony-Richardson

28734id_092_large.jpg

sAyvt3qLGVUlBaHDDLG1vMF24HKrUk_large.jpg

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Blade Runner: The Final Cut (1982)


"Eternally! I don’t want to live eternally! Why did you say that to me? Get away from me! Stay away! Go away, all of you! Let me alone! Stay away!"
— Lawrence Talbot, Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man

"The way you walked was thorny though no fault of your own, but as the rain enters the soil, the river enters the sea, so tears run to a predestined end. Now you will have peace for eternity.”
— Maleva, The Wolf Man

"The Monster pauses and tells Henry and Elizabeth: 'Go! You live! Go!'           To Pretorius and the Bride, he says: 'You stay. We belong dead'. While Henry and Elizabeth flee, the Monster looks at the Bride who hisses at him. Shedding a tear, he pulls a lever to trigger the laboratory and tower's destruction."
— The Monster, Bride of Frankenstein

 

So, I finally saw Blade Runner, for the first time. I'm sorry to say that, although I enjoyed the film, I was not impressed. I've seen too many movies about creatures who are part human and part something else, suffering existential angst as a consequence. Many of them -- one might almost call them Byronic heroes -- are yearning to escape from their plight as marginal men who want to answer affirmatively to the question "Are we not men?" Even Damien in one of the later Omen films seems to experience that yearning.

The acting in Blade Runner is very good. The film's visual artistry has been praised and is impressive. Rutger Hauer makes a fine replicant. The question of what is a human being is present throughout. (Reminds me of the theology of Karl Rahner and the doctrine of implicit Christianity, to some extent.) The stigmata and the dove symbols are a bit over the top, but well done, the dove being a symbol of peace, of the soul, and even the Holy Spirit (and many other things, depending on the culture).

Roy Batty's final speech has been praised. I think overpraised. If you want to see a marginal figure reciting an inspiring, moving monologue, read the Monster's speech from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (I've quoted part of it, below). The recent National Theatre production with Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller brings at least the spirit of it into focus:

 

"Be calm! I entreat you to hear me before you give vent to your hatred on my devoted head. Have I not suffered enough, that you seek to increase my misery? Life, although it may only be an accumulation of anguish, is dear to me, and I will defend it. Remember, thou hast made me more powerful than thyself; my height is superior to thine, my joints more supple. But I will not be tempted to set myself in opposition to thee. I am thy creature, and I will be even mild and docile to my natural lord and king if thou wilt also perform thy part, the which thou owest me. Oh, Frankenstein, be not equitable to every other and trample upon me alone, to whom thy justice, and even thy clemency and affection, is most due. Remember that I am thy creature; I ought to be thy Adam, but I am rather the fallen angel, whom thou drivest from joy for no misdeed. Everywhere I see bliss, from which I alone am irrevocably excluded. I was benevolent and good; misery made me a fiend. Make me happy, and I shall again be virtuous.”
 
“How can I move thee? Will no entreaties cause thee to turn a favourable eye upon thy creature, who implores thy goodness and compassion? Believe me, Frankenstein, I was benevolent; my soul glowed with love and humanity; but am I not alone, miserably alone? You, my creator, abhor me; what hope can I gather from your fellow creatures, who owe me nothing? They spurn and hate me. The desert mountains and dreary glaciers are my refuge. I have wandered here many days; the caves of ice, which I only do not fear, are a dwelling to me, and the only one which man does not grudge. These bleak skies I hail, for they are kinder to me than your fellow beings. If the multitude of mankind knew of my existence, they would do as you do, and arm themselves for my destruction. Shall I not then hate them who abhor me? I will keep no terms with my enemies. I am miserable, and they shall share my wretchedness. Yet it is in your power to recompense me, and deliver them from an evil which it only remains for you to make so great, that not only you and your family, but thousands of others, shall be swallowed up in the whirlwinds of its rage. Let your compassion be moved, and do not disdain me. Listen to my tale; when you have heard that, abandon or commiserate me, as you shall judge that I deserve. But hear me. The guilty are allowed, by human laws, bloody as they are, to speak in their own defence before they are condemned. Listen to me, Frankenstein. You accuse me of murder, and yet you would, with a satisfied conscience, destroy your own creature. Oh, praise the eternal justice of man! Yet I ask you not to spare me; listen to me, and then, if you can, and if you will, destroy the work of your hands.”
 
So I enjoyed Blade Runner and am glad it's finally off my film bucket list. There is a chess game, and as we know, when there is a game of chess in a movie, this is generally who comes to mind:
 
seventh-seal-chess-game.jpg
 
 
510ff08ae6ff89d5922028d85d13e4ba6146b6d4
 
tyrell-thinking.gif
I paused the film briefly for a bit of web browsing and was sad to read of Joe Turkel's death.
 
five-things-you-didnt-know-about-blade-r
 
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just finished watching DARK PASSAGE on HBO Max. I've seen it several times, but not recently. As a huge Bogart fan it's always been of my favorites. It's not really a noir even though some of the elements are present. Like THE LADY IN THE LAKE  the viewer sees everything through the main characters eyes and does not see him until later in the film.  Both Bogart and Bacall are as good as ever and Agnes Moorehead is great too. My favorite part of the film is when Vincent Parry (Bogart) visits an underground plastic surgeon to alter his appearance.  I think it's a great film even though the climax seemed a little contrived.  If you haven't seen it and are a fan of Bogie, I highly recommend it.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

Just finished watching DARK PASSAGE on HBO Max. I've seen it several times, but not recently. As a huge Bogart fan it's always been of my favorites. It's not really a noir even though some of the elements are present. Like THE LADY IN THE LAKE  the viewer sees everything through the main characters eyes and does not see him until later in the film.  Both Bogart and Bacall are as good as ever and Agnes Moorehead is great too. My favorite part of the film is when Vincent Parry (Bogart) visits an underground plastic surgeon to alter his appearance.  I think it's a great film even though the climax seemed a little contrived.  If you haven't seen it and are a fan of Bogie, I highly recommend it.

Dark Passage has a few noir themes:  E.g.    The Bogart character:  a man convicted of murder who is innocent and on the run trying to prove he is innocent.    That is a noir protagonist in my book.      He is helped by a total stranger,  one whose father was also convicted of murder.    She is rich and had a spoiled life but still decides to risk her comfort to help someone she believes is like her father.       

Then there is the Moorehead character;   Her oppressions to cling to the men she falls for and if they don't accept her love to destroy them,   is very dark.    Also she kills Perry's best friend just to hurt Perry.   It wasn't because he knew anything about her crime,  but only because she knew Perry loved his friend more so than he ever loved her.

The cab driver is a classic noir type supporting character,  and to a lesser degree,  so is the plastic surgeon.  

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

so i finally finished "summer place" - 2:10 perplexingly long hrs

what can i say.  given some of the names connected with the movie, this was really pretty bad.

i laughed mockingly throughout the movie so at least i had some fun watching it, but honestly if this movie was made in the 90s troy and sandra would have driven off a cliff like thelma and louise because up until near the end there was a definite aura of doom over troy and sandra... i can see why it was both panned by the critics and beloved by the audience.

i give it a 2* for the movie and 6* for the laughs = averaging out to 4*

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, Swithin said:

So I enjoyed Blade Runner and am glad it's finally off my film bucket list. There is a chess game, and as we know, when there is a game of chess in a movie, this is generally who comes to mind:

Not the erotic chess game in The Thomas Crown Affair?

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, miltk said:

what can i say.  given some of the names connected with the movie, this was really pretty bad.

You didn't like the hexagonal beach house?

But while A Summer Place is a mess, it's a really fun mess, with a hissably nasty Constance Ford, and a ridiculous teen romance.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

The cab driver is a classic noir type supporting character,  and to a lesser degree,  so is the plastic surgeon.  

Which brings up the question of why anybody would get plastic surgery to look more like Humphrey Bogart.  Not that he was homely, but even in the early 1930s he looked liked he'd live a life's worth, and didn't have the matinee-idol looks that someone like Errol Flynn (another hard-living actor who definitely looked old beyond his years by the end) did.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, miltk said:

so i finally finished "summer place" - 2:10 perplexingly long hrs

what can i say.  given some of the names connected with the movie, this was really pretty bad.

i laughed mockingly throughout the movie so at least i had some fun watching it, but honestly if this movie was made in the 90s troy and sandra would have driven off a cliff like thelma and louise because up until near the end there was a definite aura of doom over troy and sandra... i can see why it was both panned by the critics and beloved by the audience.

i give it a 2* for the movie and 6* for the laughs = averaging out to 4*

I’m thinking you would probably enjoy SUSAN SLADE (1961)- A film which features many of the same actors as A SUMMER PLACE and has a similar plot, but – get this – is even stupider.

I know that’s hard to believe, but if you get a chance to see it, you’ll know I’m not exaggerating.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, Fedya said:

Which brings up the question of why anybody would get plastic surgery to look more like Humphrey Bogart.  Not that he was homely, but even in the early 1930s he looked liked he'd live a life's worth, and didn't have the matinee-idol looks that someone like Errol Flynn (another hard-living actor who definitely looked old beyond his years by the end) did.

For me that's one of the most interesting things about Bogart. While there were many actors of his generation that were way better looking. he was THE MAN. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, Swithin said:

So, I finally saw Blade Runner, for the first time. I'm sorry to say that, although I enjoyed the film, I was not impressed.

Thanks for your comments. I've never seen it either, although everyone urges me to. I think I got it from the library & didn't last 20 minutes.

2 hours ago, Fedya said:

Which brings up the question of why anybody would get plastic surgery to look more like Humphrey Bogart. 

LOL. Bogey is a perfect example of a guy who's so wonderful, his face becomes endearing, if not handsome, per se. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Fedya said:

Which brings up the question of why anybody would get plastic surgery to look more like Humphrey Bogart.  Not that he was homely, but even in the early 1930s he looked liked he'd live a life's worth, and didn't have the matinee-idol looks that someone like Errol Flynn (another hard-living actor who definitely looked old beyond his years by the end) did.

Well the surgeon did say he could make the guy look like a monkey.    Surgeon decided to be generous and make him only look like Bogie.   One gets what they paid for.

 

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's been shown on TCM before, but Saturday night was the first time I was able to watch "Belle de Jour".  Catherine Deneuve plays the title role as a Parisian housewife who fantasizes about getting her kink on.  In her case, she likes it rough as she daydreams about ways to be physically humiliated by men.  In spite of having a husband (Jean Sorel) who adores her, she wishes he were more assertive with her, as witnessed in the first 10 minutes of the movie.  It was quite an eyebrow-raiser when I first saw that scene, but I could never watch the film in its entirety until last night.  Deneuve then tries to scratch her itch by becoming an afternoon prostitute.  After some initial hesitation and uncertainty, Belle de Jour becomes the high class favorite of some of Madame Anais' clientele.  In a strange way, her afternoon flings have made her more content and brings her closer to her husband who has no clue about how his wife spends her time when he's away.  Things are going swimingly until she entertains Marcel (Pierre Clementi), a small-time crook with a sadistic side which Belle de Jour likes.  Marcel develops an infatuation with her to the point that he has his compatriot in crime follow her home so he can pass that information onto Marcel.  He then goes to her home and threatens to expose her secret to her unsuspecting husband if she doesn't devote more time to him and him alone.  She refuses and orders him out since her husband, Pierre, is expected home shortly.  Minutes after he leaves, Severine (Belle de Jour) hears gunshots from the street below.  Apparently, Marcel has shot someone on the street near the entrance to her home.  The victim turns out to be her husband who is then seen as a blind man who is also wheelchair-bound.  The movie ends with Pierre shedding the shades and getting out of the wheelchair to embrace his wife as they re-kindle their romance...but, is that the reality or another of Deneuve's fantasies?  Interesting film that was probably seen as quite provocative and controversial when it was made in 1967, but quite tame by today's standards.   I really liked this picture.  I'd give it an 8 out of 10.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Fedya said:

Which brings up the question of why anybody would get plastic surgery to look more like Humphrey Bogart.  Not that he was homely, but even in the early 1930s he looked liked he'd live a life's worth, and didn't have the matinee-idol looks that someone like Errol Flynn (another hard-living actor who definitely looked old beyond his years by the end) did.

Back alley plastic surgeons can only make people look like Bogart or Broderick Crawford. If you want to look like Flynn you have to pay the big bucks up town.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Back alley plastic surgeons can only make people look like Bogart or Broderick Crawford. If you want to look like Flynn you have to pay the big bucks up town.

Too much cigarette smoke in the surgeon's eyes to see properly...

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Fedya said:

Which brings up the question of why anybody would get plastic surgery to look more like Humphrey Bogart. 

Anonymity. People who are very attractive receive an undue amount of attention. An escaped convict does not wish attention. Looking quite average works in their favor. Being forgettable is an asset. 

It is to be assumed that there was no movie star who looked like that in the world in which that movie is set. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

HIGH SIERRA (1941) 
Boy, I love Ida Lupino; I'm excited to get through more of her projects this year. Bogey was in top form also. Basic plot: Bogie has just been sprung from the hoosegow in order to lead a big robbery for one of his old associates; he meets Marie (Lupino), who's friends with the gang of thieves, and they have an interesting relationship throughout. I'm very glad older movies are continuously added to the Criterion Collection, as it brings them more awareness from the masses. 
High Sierra. 1941. Directed by Raoul Walsh | MoMA

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

HIGH SIERRA (1941) 
Boy, I love Ida Lupino; I'm excited to get through more of her projects this year. Bogey was in top form also. Basic plot: Bogie has just been sprung from the hoosegow in order to lead a big robbery for one of his old associates; he meets Marie (Lupino), who's friends with the gang of thieves, and they have an interesting relationship throughout. I'm very glad older movies are continuously added to the Criterion Collection, as it brings them more awareness from the masses. 
High Sierra. 1941. Directed by Raoul Walsh | MoMA

IN RE: THE WORK OF IDA LUPINO

DEEP VALLEY (1947) is really good.

Less easy to find (try online?) are THE LIGHT THAT FAILED (1939) and PETER IBBETSON (1935) in which she has a small part.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Tikisoo said:

Thanks for your comments. I've never seen  BLADE RUNNER, although everyone urges me to. I think I got it from the library & didn't last 20 minutes.

ME TOO!

(Well, I didn't get a copy from the library, but I've tried several times to watch it and always clock out between 20 and 30 minutes in.)

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Boy, I love Ida Lupino;

So do I and "High Sierra," is the one that made me a huge fan many years ago.  She breaks my heart in this,  she is such a superior person to the other woman, but Bogie can only see Ida as a  casual girlfriend who he can't really love because she's "been around," while he puts the gold digging farm girl on a pedestal for her superficial "innocence."    Also That  sweet little dog!

I always thought it was strange that Ida usually played women who were supposed to be ordinary looking, as though she wasn't as beautiful as I always thought she was.

Sort of the opposite to what we were mentioning about Bogie up thread.  his scripts usually had women reacting to him as though he was drop dead gorgeous.  There's one film noir where he goes into a book store and the clerk locks the door, pulls down the shade, takes of her glasses and nearly attacks him.  Hilarious.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, AndreaDoria said:

There's one film noir where he goes into a book store and the clerk locks the door, pulls down the shade, takes of her glasses and nearly attacks him.  Hilarious.

That would be the famous Acme Bookstore in "The Big Sleep".  The clerk is Dorothy Malone in one of her early film roles.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...