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After sitting through Silver Streak I watched a short titled Roast Beef and Movies (1934)

Just bizarre. With a very hard to understand ethic comic, and one of the Three Stooges.  Some awful puns, jarring sound effects and a so-so musical style dance number. Oh-and a smutty short visual thing for good measure.


Historically interesting because it's shot in a early form of color instead of black and white. 

But an awful movie otherwise.


 

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1 hour ago, King Rat said:

I was delighted that TCM showed The Half-Naked Truth (1932) tonight. It was great to see this charming film again. Lee Tracy motormouthing, Lupe Velez enticing, Eugene Pallette growling, Frank Morgan bossing and then caving, Franklin Pangborn pangborning (that prissy sissy act that gets an extra laugh deserves a verb of its own). Gregory La Cava was one of the top directors of comedy in the 1930s.

You beat me to it! i wanted to post about it tonight-well now- and you did it much better and perfectly. The whole cast was great by the way I was curious about the 2 secretaries Miss Flowers and Miss Mason were actually the real names of the actresses,one of them is Bess Flowers the Queen of the Extras more than 700 films ! I'am sure I had seen it maybe 15 years ago basically for Lupe but I discovered Lee Tracy  only 2 years ago so the film was very fresh to me so I enjoyed it very much. i also like Gregory La Cava very much he was a very good director

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MV5BN2I5YmQ1MDgtZDU3ZC00M2NmLTgwZDktNDRl

The Lineup from 1958 with Robert Keith, Eli Wallach and Emile Meyer

 
 
The Lineup is a solid entry in the popular 1950s crime-drama genre with the added fun of it practically being a travelogue of mid-century San Francisco. 
 
After a suitcase is stolen from a passenger alighting in San Francisco from a ship just in from Hong Kong, followed by the crook being killed in a car crash trying to get away, two detectives discover heroin hidden in an inexpensive chinese statuette in the luggage. 
 
Realizing they are on to a potentially huge heroin ring that uses passengers as unwitting drug mules, the two detectives begin their investigation. The Lineup, though, quickly shifts perspective to the two "professionals" hired by the mob to collect the heroin from the unsuspecting carriers.
 
Foreshadowing Tarantino, director Don Siegel personalized the two hired guns. The older one, a worn-out professional looking to retire, played by Robert Keith, is training his replacement, played by Eli Wallach, but we come to see that, while Keith is a cold-blooded professional, Wallach is psychotic. (Director Don Siegel explored a similar mobster dynamic in his 1964 movie The Killers, comments here: https://www.thefedoralounge.com/threads/what-was-the-last-movie-you-watched.20830/post-2781987)
 
As Keith and Wallach try to "collect the merchandise," they leave a trail of dead bodies because each "pick up" goes awry. With the police, unknown to Keith and Wallach, getting close based on the too-many clues they've left in their wake, they kidnap the last drug mule - a mother and young daughter - because the daughter unwittingly found and destroyed the heroin.
 
Wallach takes these two to "the man" to explain why they are "short," i.e., can't deliver all the heroin they are supposed to, but Godfather-like, "the man" has no interest in explanations telling Wallach, effectively, you failed and you're dead. Psychotic Wallach panics, kills "the man," and then tries to escape San Francisco, but just as he gets back to the car, the police close in. 
 
It's now Wallach, Keith, their two hostages and their suffering-from-alcohol-withdrawal driver speeding away in their souped-up Chevy from an ever-growing number of chasing police cars and upcoming roadblocks. 
 
It would be eclipsed ten-year later in Bullitt, but for 1958, it's one heck-of-good, climatic car-chase scene using the wonderful hills and iconic background of San Francisco to maximum effect. 
 
It's also like everything else in the Lineup where the thoughtful characterization of the criminals, the messy morality and the slower buildup to the action scenes foreshadows the changing approach Hollywood was just starting to take toward mob movies. 
 
The Lineup's story, itself, is reasonably enjoyable, but what really works is Wallach and Keith as an early incarnation of crooks you don't root for, but still see as complex characters with an engaging interpersonal dynamic who are, oddly, just trying to do their (insane and illegal) jobs. 
 
 
N.B. The movie The Lineup is an early example of a successful TV show, The Lineup, which ran on CBS from 1954 to 1960, being turned into a theatrical movie. Almost everything is older than you think.  
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9 hours ago, Grumpytoad said:

Silver Streak (1976) with

Gene Wilder 

Jill Clayburgh

Richard Pryor

Patrick McGoohan

 

A train traveling book editor sees a murder victim,  but later sees the victim alive and well. This leads to a fairly complicated plot involving stolen letters, forgery, and the FBI. 
 

I was disappointed.  The movie wasn't bad,  but mostly just average. Wilder is the editor, Clayburgh a secretary he falls for, and Pryor a thief who befriends Wilder. McGoohan as the main bad guy.

Wilder and Claybergh acted well enough, and their romance was believable but not very interesting. I've just seen both of them be better in better movies. 

Pryor I thought seemed like a surprisingly  natural actor. He seemed very comfortable in his role. It's a shame about his real life struggles. I think he would have become a very good character actor with a long career under better circumstances.

Regarding McGoohan. I'm currently watching his 60's television classic "The Prisoner". It's odd, but I find it surprisingly entertaining. But I am just not impressed  with McGoohans acting. It feels one dimensional to me in both tv show and movie. He is menacing , but that's about it. But I may be wrong. Wiki says he was a three time acting award winner.

Sadly, from my perspective the best thing about Silver Streak was the special effects work. Wilder ACTUALLY seemed to be putting himself in grave danger more than once. And the final train sequence looked incredibly realistic, especially for a movie from the 70's.

Almost forgot: An actor by the name of Richard Kiel is also in this. His character has some odd dental issues, and Kiel played this same odd role in two other movies, although  the characters name changed.

Grading this one with a C+
 

I wonder if THIS one is more interesting:

A3BA625E-02F6-45F8-822A-29CD4F1FEA5E.jpeg.e2da50c1cbf32da022626e09dea5b244.jpeg

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Silver Streak (1976) is one of my favorite movies.  Give it an A+.  The Silver Streak (1934) is an earlier movie and not similar in plot at all - more of a drama featuring a new for the time train.  Even though I like most train movies, I found The Silver Streak (1934) somewhat boring. 

I think the writers in Silver Streak, the actors and the cast did a great job.  Always been a fan of Clayburgh, Wilder and Pryor.  Ned Beatty and McGoohan are fairly good in it as well.

Incidentally, the train is actually a CP Rail train that was repainted for the movie.  AMTrak seldom cooperates in making movies. 

The final scene was filmed in an airport hanger with replicas.

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4 hours ago, Fading Fast said:

The Lineup's story, itself, is reasonably enjoyable, but what really works is Wallach and Keith as an early incarnation of crooks you don't root for, but still see as complex characters with an engaging interpersonal dynamic who are, oddly, just trying to do their (insane and illegal) jobs. 

Very nice take on this late cycle noir\crime film.     As you note we don't root for Wallach and Keith (well most of us, hopefully,  ha ha),   but when Wallach throws the head guy over that rail,   it is hard to suppress a "good for you,  that guy deserved it!".       The movie was about a concept I used to hear from my older brothers hippy friends:  the MAN.

Typically the MAN,  is  the justice system as represented by the various authorities (cops,  judges,  DAs).    That exist in this film.    The hoods  are running from the MAN.  But there is also the mob boss as the MAN.     Wallach is able to even the score with one of the them,  but of course,  not the other.    

Note that in the credits;  the actor,  Vaughn Taylor  is listed as The MAN.

I also like this line from you: Foreshadowing Tarantino, director Don Siegel,,,  To often I see people saying  something like; Siegel reminds me of Tarantino,,,,. NOT.  I assume they know which director \ actor came first,  but that they saw films from the one that came later before they saw films from the one that foreshadowed the other.

 

 

 

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Before Morning (1933)

 

An actress with a respectable suitor and a married lover is distraught when her lover dies in her bedroom.

I am quite sure that this was a wonderful play. The fact that it takes place in a drawing room adds to its commercial appeal. The movie expands by showing also the bedroom, a hallway and a foyer. It does not change from the basic format of being solely based on dialogue with no action other than the dead body being hustled out, a great deal of hand-wringing and some emotive flouncing. 

I recommend this movie based solely on it having a very interesting plot twist. I have watched it twice and found no evidence of any foreshadowing which would spoil the surprise. 

I am not a fan of Leo Carrillo because he seems to me at all times to be a cheap imitation of a stereotypical Latino. I have never seen him in a role in which he proudly portrays his heritage. The fact that he here adopts a very bad accent does not help.

It is a very good length for the material as it comes in at just under and hour.

6.1/11

It is available for viewing free with commercials on: TubiTV.

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16 hours ago, Grumpytoad said:

Pryor I thought seemed like a surprisingly  natural actor.

He's surprisingly good in a dramatic role in Lady Sings the Blues.

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19 hours ago, King Rat said:

I was delighted that TCM showed The Half-Naked Truth (1932) tonight. It was great to see this charming film again. Lee Tracy motormouthing, Lupe Velez enticing, Eugene Pallette growling, Frank Morgan bossing and then caving, Franklin Pangborn pangborning (that prissy sissy act that gets an extra laugh deserves a verb of its own). Gregory La Cava was one of the top directors of comedy in the 1930s.

You know…

I love Lee Tracy, I love Lupe Velez, I love precode films, and I love movies about carnivals, broadway, hucksters and press agents- but this one JUST LEAVES ME COLD!!! (Same thing with TWENTIETH CENTURY)

I have tried several times – including just now- to get through it in entirety- but it’s just too meandering a film and not funny enough.

(so says the person who has watched Jaws 3-D in French three times this week- So please take whatever criticism I have with a verrrrry large grain of salt.)

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5 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

(so says the person who has watched Jaws 3-D in French three times this week- So please take whatever criticism I have with a verrrrry large grain of salt.)

I wonder. You know how Americans hear a British accent and think the speaker sounds really smart? Did Jaws 3D in French sound more highbrow to you? Less ... Stupid?

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6 minutes ago, LuckyDan said:

I wonder. You know how Americans hear a British accent and think the speaker sounds really smart? Did Jaws 3D in French sound more highbrow to you? Less ... Stupid?

Yes it absolutely did. 100%

all the frogspeak just added a shellac of beguiling, enticing mystery and class to the affair, One which is absolutely missing when the characters are speaking English, which I do speak and do understand.

I mentioned this in my review, but “Jaws the revenge” in French comes off almost like a CAMUS novel- you have absolutely no idea what’s going on but it all seems terribly legit somehow because they’re all speaking French.

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Also the French actors were like 100% committed to their voiceover work, With the exception of the guy dubbing Louis Gossett Jr., every single one of the actors doing the French dubbing really amped up the excitement and passion of the reads. 

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21 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I mentioned this in my review, but “Jaws the revenge” in French comes off almost like a CAMUS novel- you have absolutely no idea what’s going on but it all seems terribly legit somehow because they’re all speaking French.

Oh. That's probably where I got it but forgot you said it yourself between then and now.  I blame meds for my recent short term memory loss. The good thing about it is that, as Peter Allen sang, everything old is new again!

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12 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Also the French actors were like 100% committed to their voiceover work, With the exception of the guy dubbing Louis Gossett Jr., every single one of the actors doing the French dubbing really amped up the excitement and passion of the reads. 

DougieB and I were discussing a Jayne Mansfield movie in April (Dog Eat Dog) where we both noticed that the voice actress who dubbed Jayne into English from the original Italian enhanced her performance. 

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3 hours ago, SansFin said:

Before Morning (1933)

 

An actress with a respectable suitor and a married lover is distraught when her lover dies in her bedroom.

I am quite sure that this was a wonderful play. The fact that it takes place in a drawing room adds to its commercial appeal. The movie expands by showing also the bedroom, a hallway and a foyer. It does not change from the basic format of being solely based on dialogue with no action other than the dead body being hustled out, a great deal of hand-wringing and some emotive flouncing. 

I recommend this movie based solely on it having a very interesting plot twist. I have watched it twice and found no evidence of any foreshadowing which would spoil the surprise. 

I am not a fan of Leo Carrillo because he seems to me at all times to be a cheap imitation of a stereotypical Latino. I have never seen him in a role in which he proudly portrays his heritage. The fact that he here adopts a very bad accent does not help.

It is a very good length for the material as it comes in at just under and hour.

6.1/11

It is available for viewing free with commercials on: TubiTV.

It's also on youtube, although the print is of rather poor quality. The version on youtube is 67 minutes long rather than under an hour. 

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5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Also the French actors were like 100% committed to their voiceover work, With the exception of the guy dubbing Louis Gossett Jr., every single one of the actors doing the French dubbing really amped up the excitement and passion of the reads. 

I usually don't object as much to performances in foreign films as I do sometimes to American films, probably because I miss all the verbal nuance (or lack thereof) that is obvious in our own language. This works both ways: French critics overvalued some American films precisely because they didn't understand the language. Much of Samuel Fuller's dialogue, for instance, would be much better when translated into French, or Serbo-Croatian, or Urdu, Swahili, etc.

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48 minutes ago, King Rat said:

French critics overvalued some American films precisely because they didn't understand the language. 

That explains a lot. 

01eSDr9.jpg

Salut madame!

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On 6/27/2022 at 5:49 PM, AndreaDoria said:

So have I, but I watched "Rome Adventure" a few months ago and liked certain things about it.  Suzanne Pleshette, who I've always thought was underrated, plays a young teacher who's treating herself to a Rome vacation.  She meets and falls in love with Troy Donahue who is having a torrid affair with  a young,  steamy Angie Dickenson. 

There's a scene I really like where Suzanne and Troy go to a club and listen to a beautiful version of "Al Di La" and Suzanne does the best acting, ever,  of "young woman in love face," for three minutes straight.  

I figured she did it so well because she really was in love with Troy and they married soon after.  The marriage lasted nine months.  He was married three more times, each marriage lasting about two years.  In two cases the reasons weren't given but two other cases charged him with cruelty.  Before he met Suzanne he had been arrested for hitting a young woman  he was engaged to.   It's sad for all  of them and helps explain why his career sort of went the way of opening car dealerships and drinking.  It's my homemade theory that Troy was gay and trying to force himself to love these women.

Anyway, I can't do screen caps so here's the whole Al di la number.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_X6rPxBMqs

 

 

Just watched the clip. Glorious song and performance. 
Suzanne Pleshette did some first class work. Her sad teacher role in The Birds and her work opposite Bob Newhart on tv are nice examples of her range.

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On 6/28/2022 at 3:29 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

Another one I have not seen, although I have meant to. I know it got to be a popular reference on earlier eps of MST 3K.

I used to think that a movie by the name of  Zardoz should have featured on Mystery Science Theater because it was so infuriatingly awful. But on reflection I realized it was also incredibly boring, which would have put everyone watching into a coma including the shows  host.

Seriously, worst movie I ever bought a ticket for. 

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17 hours ago, ElCid said:

Silver Streak (1976) is one of my favorite movies.  Give it an A+.  The Silver Streak (1934) is an earlier movie and not similar in plot at all - more of a drama featuring a new for the time train.  Even though I like most train movies, I found The Silver Streak (1934) somewhat boring. 

I think the writers in Silver Streak, the actors and the cast did a great job.  Always been a fan of Clayburgh, Wilder and Pryor.  Ned Beatty and McGoohan are fairly good in it as well.

Incidentally, the train is actually a CP Rail train that was repainted for the movie.  AMTrak seldom cooperates in making movies. 

The final scene was filmed in an airport hanger with replicas.

Respect that you enjoyed it! I did find it pleasantly weird that the train operator in the movie was Amroad instead of Amtrak. Interesting that it was a Canadian Pacific engine.

 

17 hours ago, ElCid said:

Silver Streak (1976) is one of my favorite movies.  Give it an A+.  The Silver Streak (1934) is an earlier movie and not similar in plot at all - more of a drama featuring a new for the time train.  Even though I like most train movies, I found The Silver Streak (1934) somewhat boring. 

I think the writers in Silver Streak, the actors and the cast did a great job.  Always been a fan of Clayburgh, Wilder and Pryor.  Ned Beatty and McGoohan are fairly good in it as well.

Incidentally, the train is actually a CP Rail train that was repainted for the movie.  AMTrak seldom cooperates in making movies. 

The final scene was filmed in an airport hanger with replicas.

 

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12 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I love Lee Tracy, I love Lupe Velez, I love precode films, and I love movies about carnivals, broadway, hucksters and press agents- but this one JUST LEAVES ME COLD!!! (Same thing with TWENTIETH CENTURY)

Well I recorded it so was happy to hear King Rat's positive impressions of it.

Even though I'm a Barrymore Ham Fan, I never liked 20th CENTURY. Then I saw it screened with an audience, laughed and thoroughly enjoyed it. And what continued to make me laugh was Barrymore's "ting-a-ling" -probably overdone for many viewers- I cracked up every time. 

I have found it amazing the difference sometimes between seeing a movie alone in my living room and seeing it with others. 

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belle-de-jour-1967-003-catherine-deneuve
Belle de Jour from 1967 with Catherine Deneuve wearing Yves Saint Laurent couture 


While the normal distribution curve of sexual fantasy seems reasonably concentrated (pirates, naughty nurses, blindfolds, plaid skirts, handcuffs, etc.), the tails clearly spread way out. Apparently, they spread far enough out to include a beautiful, upper-class woman, with a young handsome and loving husband, who is frigid in her marriage, but who gets her kicks being a prostitute during the day when her husband is at work.

Sure, it's happened in real life, but probably never quite as it does in Belle de Jour whose entire story - with a bunch of French and Freudian repressed sexual angst and reverie wrapped inside - is less interesting than the one thing that really makes this movie tick: watching beautiful Catherine Deneuve wear and take off some incredible 1960s Yves Saint Laurent couture. Everything else is just filler.

There is enough existential, surrealistic Frenchy late 1960s plot going on to keep the story kinda interesting, but Deneuve, playing the wonderfully named Séverine Serizy, and her clothes are why you revisit the movie. 

 
She's married to a young handsome and independently rich rising-star doctor in a marriage that looks perfect from the outside, but that doesn't do it for Deneuve who, it is hinted at, was sexually abused as a young girl.

While her frustrated but understanding husband waits for his wife to hopefully thaw one day, dream- and fantasy-driven Deneuve finds her way to an upscale brothel where she takes the name Belle de Jour. She seems to enjoy having sex with random men in the afternoon, but always stops in time to make it home for cocktails with her husband. "And how was your day, dear?"

Most of her clients are movieland brothel creations - okay looking, reasonably nice and in awe of Deneuve - which makes her double life fun for her until she meets a deranged gangster who really fires up Deneuve' libido - danger and risk are clearly her thing.

The climax smashes everything together - Deneuve's real life, her fantasies and her afternoon sex sprees - in a 1960s French cinema way that leaves it up to you to decide what happened. 
 
It really doesn't matter, though, as the kinky-angsty plot has already said what it wanted to say: repressed twin-bed bourgeois marital sex is so boring it could drive a wife to prostitution, or some such pseudo-intellectual 1960s disaffected philosophical thing like that.

The plot is just a beard anyway so that you can watch elegant and ethereally beautiful Deneuve wear timelessly gorgeous of-the-moment perfect fashion designs by Yves Saint Laurent. Deneuve's clothes are an equal co-star in this one as Belle de Jour is the R-rated cognate to Audrey Hepburn wearing Givenchy in Sabrina.

Hollywood has moved way past the mild sex and fantasy of Belle de Jour - you'll notice a lot of Belle de Jour echoes in later films like the mind-numbingly boring Eyes Wide Shut - but it has yet to equal the detached and classic beauty of Catherine Deneuve leaving an Yves Saint Laurent dress balled up on the floor of her afternoon boudoir as she gets her kink on.
 
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36ee5866a097cf991e0621bb048c2ddaa7c3151d
Belle-De-Jour-mysterious-box-700x413.jpg
tumblr_nk6dfteAen1rgpdxjo1_540.jpg?w=504
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On 7/7/2022 at 11:06 PM, King Rat said:

I was delighted that TCM showed The Half-Naked Truth (1932) tonight. It was great to see this charming film again. Lee Tracy motormouthing, Lupe Velez enticing, Eugene Pallette growling, Frank Morgan bossing and then caving, Franklin Pangborn pangborning (that prissy sissy act that gets an extra laugh deserves a verb of its own). Gregory La Cava was one of the top directors of comedy in the 1930s.

 

On 7/8/2022 at 12:37 AM, nakano said:

You beat me to it! i wanted to post about [THE HALF NAKED TRUTH]tonight-well now- and you did it much better and perfectly. The whole cast was great by the way I was curious about the 2 secretaries Miss Flowers and Miss Mason were actually the real names of the actresses,one of them is Bess Flowers the Queen of the Extras more than 700 films ! I'am sure I had seen it maybe 15 years ago basically for Lupe but I discovered Lee Tracy  only 2 years ago so the film was very fresh to me so I enjoyed it very much. i also like Gregory La Cava very much he was a very good director

 

22 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

You know…

I love Lee Tracy, I love Lupe Velez, I love precode films, and I love movies about carnivals, broadway, hucksters and press agents- but [the half-naked truth] JUST LEAVES ME COLD!!! (Same thing with TWENTIETH CENTURY)

I have tried several times – including just now- to get through [THE HALF=-NAKED TRUTH] in entirety- but it’s just too meandering a film and not funny enough.

 

9 hours ago, Tikisoo said:

Well I recorded it so was happy to hear King Rat's positive impressions of it.

 

one of my failings as a critic is that I go into modern films and tv shows wanting to dislike them and being mad at myself when I don't...

and

I go into classic films wanting to like them and being very mad at myself (usually) when I don't (although there are a few classic titles I don't feel guilty for hating...anything written by CLIFFORD ODETS comes immediately to mind...)

so i actually went and FINISHED WATCHING "THE HALF-NAKED TRUTH" (1932) out of a sense of guilt and completion.

to KINGRAT and everyone else, please know that I am genuinely sorry that I was not amused...and even more so when I read what you and Nakano wrote about it.

I want to like THE HALF NAKED TRUTH, and I certainly didn't hate it...but I was disapointed by the fact that it starts out seeming like it's going to be set in a small town that is taken advantage of by a bunch of carnival hucksters, but they drop that story fast and it becomes tangentially about showbusiness, and damned if I could see just where FRANK MORGAN really came into the thing...also VELEZ and TRACY didn't have anywhere near enough scenes together.

I was surprised at HOW (relatively) THIN EUGENE PALETTE was...a couple of lines of his dialogue (one especially where he assures a female character he is no threat to her) made no sense to me and then I read this on imdb in the trivia section for the film:

In the original script, Achilles ( Eugene Pallette ) was more specifically referred to as a eunuch, but the MPAA, in a letter to producer David O. Selznick suggested that word, as well as a few more sexually-suggestive lines, be removed. Thus, there are two attempts at getting that point across - during registration at the hotel and when Achilles speaks to the maid and she asks if he's a "different" kind of Turk.

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I did VERYMUCH enjoy LUPE VELEZ'S rendition of the song "O MR CARPENTER", which I can find very little about online besides  the youtube clip below (love the costume, it's like watching PRINCESS AURA (DAUGHTER OF MING THE MERCILESS) IN HER ONE-WOMAN BROADWAY SHOW!!!)

(IT'S THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE FILM!)

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35 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I did VERYMUCH enjoy LUPE VELEZ'S rendition of the song "O MR CARPENTER", which I can find very little about online besides  the youtube clip below (love the costume, it's like watching PRINCESS AURA (DAUGHTER OF MING THE MERCILESS) IN HER ONE-WOMAN BROADWAY SHOW!!!)

(IT'S THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE FILM!)

I love how the guy rushes out and says it's okay folks! don't get excited! when no one in the house seems to be. 

If this is the highlight ... 

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11 hours ago, Tikisoo said:

Well I recorded it so was happy to hear King Rat's positive impressions of it.

Even though I'm a Barrymore Ham Fan, I never liked 20th CENTURY. Then I saw it screened with an audience, laughed and thoroughly enjoyed it. And what continued to make me laugh was Barrymore's "ting-a-ling" -probably overdone for many viewers- I cracked up every time. 

I have found it amazing the difference sometimes between seeing a movie alone in my living room and seeing it with others. 

I shared your opinions on Twentieth Century when dealing with is solo, didn't really find it very funny.. I do know they turned it into a Broadway musical in the late 70s, and I can vouch from the cast recording that the music in that show was delightful, mock-operetta style. The musical starred John Cullum, Madeline Kahn, Kevin Kline, and Imogene Coca.

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