Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

I Just Watched...


speedracer5
 Share

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Potrzebie, another word popularized by Kurtzman in MAD Magazine, is an actual Polish word meaning "a need."

No joke, I WAS actually about to ask.  🤔

And having finally dug into a "backup" of the Mad CD-Rom, turns out they only did four Cliche' Movie Script parodies in '67-69:  The Political movie, the Opera movie, the Society movie, and, less esoterically, the War movie (in #124, which the linked site doesn't have a copy of):

Quote

"We're not running this war for your personal pleasure, Bradshaw! Tonight, by disobeying orders, you endangered the life of every man in this company! Maybe back in Civilian life you could pull things like that, being Senator Bradshaw's son! But here in this Boot Camp, you're just plain PRIVATE Bradshaw !"

******
"Okay, I need some volunteers for this mission . . . Anderson, Brown, Cowznofski, DeGrazzo, Hanlon, MacNutt, O'Reilly and Silverstein! Now, let's see . . .what have I missed? Oh, yeah--you, too, Sun Luck Chow!"

******
"I know you didn't ask to come out here, Bradshaw--but by God, now that you ARE here, you'll fight! Now I'll tell YOU something . . . first time out, I was afraid too!  Yeah, ME!  Does that surprise you?

******

"Boy, what I wouldn't give to be back on Flatbush Avenue, watchin' all the blondes go by! How about you, Bradshaw? Any real-stacked blondes up on Snob Hill? Hey . . .where ya goin' . . . ?"

******

"The last thing he said was--'Tell the Sarge this one's for Benny! '"

******

"He wiped out that machine gun nest single-handed! And to think I once called him 'yellow'!"

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Cisco Kid (1931)

The second sequel from Fox to the 1929 hit In Old Arizona, which had netted Warner Baxter the second best actor Oscar as the laughing, devil-may-care Cisco Kid.

This sequel is low on action and high on corn with the Kid, always laughing and ready to romance a woman despite his repeated sentiment that he doesn't trust them, being pursued across Arizona by a cavalry sergeant (Edmund Lowe) eager to capture him and collect the $5,000 reward. Along the way Cisco encounters a widow and her two children whose home is about to be taken away from them by the bank. Naturally the Kid decides to rob that bank in order to give the money to her that the bank say she owes them. Yeah, you read that right. The Cisco Kid as Santa Claus.

Warner Baxter mugs outrageously as the Cisco Kid, most of his performance comprised of a devilish smile and fake Mexican accent. Even worse, though, is Edmund Lowe as the blow hard sergeant who automatically goes into braggart mode every time his mouth opens. There will be a scene in which he sits at a table to eat a steak at the widow's house. First of all he empties the contents of every bottle on the table, including ketchup, I'm sure, upon the poor steak. Then, with virtually every bite of the steak that he takes Lowe can't stop shooting off his mouth about what he's going to do to the Cisco Kid when he finds him. If there was ever a scene in which you wanted to see a character gag on his food this one is it.

The Cisco Kid (1931)

The film builds to an incredibly mawkish, sentimental climax that you can see coming from a mile away. Just as you're thinking, "No, no, they're not actually going to go there, are they?" yup, they do it!

The film's one positive is some lovely black and white photography. Still there are only so many evening silhouttes of cacti and men on horseback that you can take before you think, "Okay, very pretty. Now where's the action?"

In the final analysis The Cisco Kid comes down to one main question for the viewer. Whose performance is more annoying, that of Baxter or Lowe. (My vote goes to Lowe).

The Cisco Kid (1931) - Filmaffinity

2 out of 4

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/16/2022 at 9:21 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I was really happy to see a brief cameo from BOOM MIC SHADOW- It was nice to see that he was still getting some work on occasion after all those years on DARK SHADOWS

(snipped)

on a single set, lit with an ARBY’S HEAT LAMP and  featuring an Americanized variation on David Warner’s character from STRAW DOGS serving as the de facto TORGO of the piece. 

Truly, NO ONE writes like you do, Lorna. Please, please, please write one of your screenplay characters speaking in your "voice" - I guarantee s/he will become a star,  uttering phrases like those ^^^above.

Let me add:  a filmmaker friend begged me to make a cameo in his film. I said the ONLY way would be if a line was written for me that was as memorable as "I'll have what she's having". Never materialized. I'd feel fortunate to speak lines you've written.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just read Debbie Harry's autobiography and she had mentioned some films she had been in that I had never seen. I searched my library for a few titles that sounded interesting and borrowed 2003's MY LIFE WITHOUT ME simply out of curiosity. It was described as the story of a young, 23 year old woman who will die soon from cancer. A downer? Maybe, but I like stories about people's lives (which is why I read biographies!)

The story was pretty interesting, even if several aspects implausible. The character Anna, her high school sweetheart husband and two young daughters live in a trailer on her Mom's property. Everyone is underemployed blue collar workers. Anna decides to keep her illness a secret from EVERYONE and instead makes a list of things to do before she dies. 

Anna has a typical mother/daughter relationship- she loves her Mom but both harbor resentments & are often snarky. Anna has a loving marriage but wants to experience a "different" man just for the novelty and has a relationship with a shy guy played by Mark Ruffalo. She tries drastically changing her plain "look" and somewhat befriends a wackadoo hairdresser. Amanda Plummer plays Anna's co-worker who is obsessed with her weight & therefore, food. The point of all these characters is Anna's awareness of fleeting time and just sees all those around her as wasting their lives on trivialities.

Anna records cassette tapes of "messages" to everyone she loves, first apologizing for not telling them she is dying and then saying everything she couldn't say to their faces. And in the end you see how well they took her death & advice.

Sarah Polley played the lead and completely carried the film which was amazing to me, she was only 24 years old. Apparently, she has lots of experience, starting out as a child actress.  I did not expect Harry to be in it a lot, which she wasn't, playing the doomed girl's mother. But I have to say, she played the part really well, I wasn't seeing Harry, but "the Mom" instead. While I love Amanda Plummer, the character was way too extreme & becomes comical, with a thud. The movie was photographed well and the story flowed well.

Despite the sad subject, I really enjoyed this movie and the characters have kind of stuck in my head.

My_life_without_me_ver2.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

58 minutes ago, Tikisoo said:

Truly, NO ONE writes like you do, Lorna. Please, please, please write one of your screenplay characters speaking in your "voice" - I guarantee s/he will become a star,  uttering phrases like those ^^^above.

I know.  My side muscles are sore today due to tossing up a Pepperidge Farm Chocolate Layer Cake last night.  I'm used to bingeing, but this was my first purge.  I got as far as the Arby's heat lamp and started to scream-laugh and by the time I got to the Jane Wyman pants I was in serious pain, but it was worth it.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

HEREDITARY

Anyone seen this?  Anyone at least heard of it?  I remember when it came out,  2018  I think, it seemed everyone was talking about it, and how truly frightening it was.  Some reviewers claimed it was the scariest film they'd seen in years.

I'm not a big fan of horror, but I was curious about it.  I avoided seeing it for a while because I thought it might be, well, too scary for me  ( yup, I'm a wuss when it comes to horror, as I said.)   But, since I'd heard so much about it, I finally watched it the other night.

Hmm.  Well, I suppose it was  a bit scary.  But for some reason I'd thought it would be more a ghost story than a horror film  ( I don't like horror, but I do kind of like a good ghost story.)  In some ways it was impressive, and Toni Collette's performance as the traumatized (  and traumatizing) mother was first-rate,  she doesn't hold back.

But the last half hour of the film seems like a different movie from the rest of it.  The director suddenly goes full-stop over-the-top with horror and possession and various nasty special effects.  I ended up NOT being scared, because I thought the ending was way too extreme- it seemed like everything in a supernatural horror film was being thrown into the pot.  At the risk of offending those who've seen it and loved it,  I thought it was, ultimately, a bit silly.

edit:  full disclosure, after seeing my post quoted,  I noticed a couple of typos so went back and edited them out.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

HEREDITARY

Anyone seen this?  Anyone at least heard of it?  I remember when it came out, I think 2018, I think, it seemed everyone was talking about it, and how truly frightening it was.  Some reviewers claimed it was the scariest film they'd seen in years.

I'm not a big fan of horror, but I was curious about it.  I avoided seeing it for a while because I thought it might be, well, too scary for me  ( yup, I'm a wuss when it comes to horror, as I said.)   But, since I'd heard so much about it, I finally watched it the other night.

Hmm.  Well, I suppose it was  a bit scary.  But for some reason I'd thought it would be more a ghost story than a horror film  ( I don't like horror, but I do kind of like a good ghost story.)  In some ways it was impressive, and Toni Collette's performance as the traumatized (  and traumatizing) mother was first-rate,  she doesn't hold back.

But the last half hour of the film seems like a different movie from the rest of it.  The director suddenly goes full-stop over-the-top with horror and possession and various nasty special effects.  I ended up NOT being scared, because I thought the ending was way too extreme- it seemed like everything in a supernatural horror film was being thrown into the pot.  At the risk of offending those who've seen it and loved it,  I thought it was, unltimately, a bit silly.

I didn't see it. I don't want to see it. My general revulsion to the idea of the film caused me to get locked out of a website for over two years (after I had been part of it for years, putting my whole heart into it)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

41 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

HEREDITARY

But the last half hour of the film seems like a different movie from the rest of it.  The director suddenly goes full-stop over-the-top with horror and possession and various nasty special effects.  I ended up NOT being scared, because I thought the ending was way too extreme- it seemed like everything in a supernatural horror film was being thrown into the pot.  At the risk of offending those who've seen it and loved it,  I thought it was, unltimately, a bit silly.

In the 70's, horror was grungy drive-in, with killers in the desert (because the filmmakers couldn't afford to shoot on location).

In the 80's, horror was slashers chasing teen cheerleaders and babysitters, because you could still make movies "just" for teens back then.

In the 90's, all those teens grew up, dreamed of buying rich yuppie apartments with their rich yuppie white-collar corporate-intern salaries, and afraid some...crazy stranger would take it all away from them!

In the 00's, we all had kids, and horror wasn't made for teens, but for your moms, worrying about protecting their perfect lil' trophy-toddler.

In the 10's, everyone bought real-estate, and horror fans got to watch their parents try to get ghosts and demonic presences out of their suburban fixer-upper.

Now, in the 20's, horror fans online want critical "validation", horror has to be "Metaphoric and disturbing" poetic allegories about race, motherhood or religion, and if an A24 movie doesn't either leave your head scratching or fanboys running to tell everyone "Watch this, it's so ICKY! 😛", then well, it's just not scary...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, CinemaInternational said:

I didn't see it. I don't want to see it. My general revulsion to the idea of the film caused me to get locked out of a website for over two years (after I had been part of it for years, putting my whole heart into it)

CinemaInternational,  I'm very curious...what was your revulsion to the film based on -- do you normally like horror but there was something you heard  about Hereditary that put you off?  Or are you not a fan of the genre anyway?  ?

But even more than that,  I'm curious to know what you said on that site you used to post on to get locked out?  You're pretty polite and mild-mannered on this one  ( albeit you certainly have strong opinions sometimes about the films you discuss, but that's ok ),  so I'm wondering what you could have done or said about Hereditary to get kicked off the website.  ?

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

HEREDITARY

Anyone seen this?

I saw it . . . and remember absolutely nothing about it, which tells you the impression that it made on me.

I do remember watching the trailer for Hereditary and thinking that the weird-looking little girl in it was herself a horror movie.

Hereditary is an example of why the modern horror movie leaves me cold. The horror genre, as far as I'm concerned, has annoyingly become a ghetto of "femme-centric" melodramas that do not interest, appeal to, or enthrall me.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

CinemaInternational,  I'm very curious...what was your revulsion to the film based on -- do you normally like horror but there was something you heard  about Hereditary that put you off?  Or are you not a fan of the genre anyway?  ?

But even more than that,  I'm curious to know what you said on that site you used to post on to get locked out?  You're pretty polite and mild-mannered on this one  ( albeit you certainly have strong opinions sometimes about the films you discuss, but that's ok ),  so I'm wondering what you could have done or said about Hereditary to get kicked off the website.  ?

First, I'm not the biggest fan of horror to start with, but many of the plot details of Hereditary rubbed me the wrong way (the  girl getting decapitated, the ending with Gabriel Byrne en flambe and Toni Collette sawing her head off, how evil wins in the end replete with apocalyptic overtones).  Just reading about it made me deeply uncomfortable, in the same way I felt after watching Rosemary's Baby (that film left me traumatized for a few days)

But what really rankled about it was how it was treated on this one website I was on. It was a group about Oscar contending films and movie talk in general. It was definitely a younger group of people, with me, born 1995, being one of the youngest of them all. (As a child, I grew up around adults, so I have always felt more comfortable with people older than me than with those of my own generation; it also probably plays into things that my film tastes skew toward the classic era, and most TV shows I enjoy hail from the 70s, 80s, and  90s). I did a lot for the group, being extremely supportive to others, running a long series of polls, one a week for half a year, where I would crunch the data for endless hours on hand before revealing results. But I was always viewed a bit differently for my sometimes sharp critiques on praised films, my aversion to talking about politics (which often came up, even in a movie group), the fact that I wasn't from a big city like NYC, London, or LA, and my general preference for older films.

It had boiled up once or twice before Hereditary (the even more grotesque mother! from 2017 comes to mind), but this was the film that caused the fallout. It was released in July of 2018, and seemingly everyone there was praising it as a cinematic masterpiece, and they kept talking about it endlessly for months. The catalyst though was in December when Toni Collette started getting critics circle awards for her performance. Something in me snapped and I said that I wished that the film would "get lost". Somebody immediately chimed in criticising me, something that had been happening with increasing frequency that year. I shot back that I was entitled to feel the way I did about the film based on what I heard, and the result was several piling on me all at the same time, and nobody was coming to defend me. Frustrated, I pushed the leave group button (like I had once or twice before, and those earlier times I was let back in) and stewed for a little while before asking to be let back in.

Someone messaged me back saying "Why would you want to be part of a group where they are laughing at you? " I typed back, asking if it was happening more often then I knew via private messages. He said yes. It hurt, but since this man was always a bit oil and water with me and he always had the admirable trait of honesty, I wasn't angry at him . 

However, the leader of the group had lied to me privately, told me I was well liked, and I thought he was my best friend. I confided a lot of things to him over several months. I was hurt and I asked him why did he lie. He snapped at me saying that "people think you look down at them" which was an utter lie and he then said I was not allowed to get back in until I went to therapy and that I stopped being so hard on "modern films" (and inferred I was not supposed to watch classic films or to like them more). There were other things he said that were cruel, but I forget what else was said now (although I remember he took me to task  and called me a bigot for refusing to see one other film because it reminded me of a bad time in my life when someone manipulated me ) . He called it "tough love". When I was saying he was asking too much, he told me to stop talking to him and completely banned me from the site. All this after doing all his work with those polls for the six months just before this. He also had most of the members ignore me for over two years, most refusing to even talk or acknowledge me. Out of a group of 200 people, only about 15 to 20 even gave me any acknowledgement of my existence for two years. I thought that almost all of them had been good friends.

I had  a nervous breakdown over it all , as I found it hard to concentrate, hard to pray, hard to sleep, hard to keep everything together. I had a suicidal thought or two. I still don't understand why some reacted to me the way they did, even after I was allowed back (under a different leader) in January 2021 and the return was muted if pleasant. (That I was invited back was a bolt out of the blue, a total shock) I still feel a certain pang when that one man turns up, although I am trying to be more forgiving and I will try to forget as time passes. But it changed me, made me even quieter, more self-doubting, lonelier, less likely to say how I felt about a film.

If I had any desire to see Hereditary, it was gone after that. Could not be bothered to see something that was the origin of such personal pain. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Hereditary is an example of why the modern horror movie leaves me cold. The horror genre, as far as I'm concerned, has annoyingly become a ghetto of "femme-centric" melodramas that do not interest, appeal to, or enthrall me.

The industry, having discovered that girls can be geeks online too, has decided to cash in on straw-man gender paranoia that, with the saint-canonized exception of Slumber Party Massacre (1982), horror movies aren't "feminist" enough, and are setting out to court the girl-geek audience with "avenging" the genre, and let the boy horror fans go hang.  (Despite the fact that a female writer had screenwritten the original 1978 Halloween, and invented the Jamie Lee Curtis "Smart babysitter", but who's counting?)

Which Blumhouse, for one, has made a fool of themselves going to town with, hoping that all the "sisterhood" of The Invisible Man (2020) fans will make us forget how their psychotically misandric mangling of Black Christmas (2019) was laughed off the screen...But then that kissup 2022 remake of Firestarter had to come along and remind us again why that studio is so obnoxious.

As for A24 creating the new "Snooty Horror...It's scary because it's METAPHORIC, DISTURBING and ARTISTICALLY VAGUE!  😱 " genre, it's an example of "Fan gentrification" destroying a fan genre in the belief that it's "saving" it from its mean old mainstream detractors.  The fans embrace it because it was made to challenge "their" exacting, quickly jaded tastes, and it sure as heck wasn't made for anyone else's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

If I had any desire to see Hereditary, it was gone after that. Could not be bothered to see something that was the origin of such personal pain. 

 

3 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Repeat post.

Man, how could you post that twice? I read all you wrote pretty much with my mouth open. Terrible.  I'm glad you've found a home here with us, your posts are always insightful & thoughtful. 

Which makes me wonder about the absolute weird nastiness I see among people on the internet-especially those who have grown up not knowing the real world without it. Do they have a complete disconnect to others' feelings? 

It's like high school on crack. You expect teenagers to be mean to each other, but by time you are 20 should have grown out of that, it's called maturity. I'm really afraid virtual "socialization" instead of real human face to face contact is what has been fueling all the anger & violence we see among younger people. They don't care about others as human beings but are just anonymous internet avatar pictures to them.

It's tragic, but no wonder that group didn't find a girl getting decapitated,  a person en flambe, sawing a head off or evil winning repugnant. What kind of person finds that entertaining?

Call us oldies, but if you can't find joy in this...

 

 

  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quick comment - I find films too graphic today.  Leave it to the imagination - two examples:  We never actually see Butch and Sundance get killed and in Rear Window, we don't want to see what the dog dug up in the garden.

Last night, among other things, I re-watched Bells Are Ringing.  My Mom and Aunt knew Judy Holliday.  I don't think she was happy with the film.  On stage, Sydney Chaplin  (sp?) did the part that Dean Martin (a bigger name) did.  Comden and Green wrote Just in Time for him.  Judy H. was a great talent who died too young of breast cancer (this was her last film).  Jean Stapleton rounds out a stellar cast (including a very funny Frank Gorshin).

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, EricJ said:

The industry, having discovered that girls can be geeks online too, has decided to cash in on straw-man gender paranoia that, with the saint-canonized exception of Slumber Party Massacre (1982), horror movies aren't "feminist" enough, and are setting out to court the girl-geek audience with "avenging" the genre, and let the boy horror fans go hang.  (Despite the fact that a female writer had screenwritten the original 1978 Halloween, and invented the Jamie Lee Curtis "Smart babysitter", but who's counting?)

I grew up on horror films that had a male focus and energy, and which starred actors (Lugosi, Karloff, Chaney, Price, Cushing, Lee et al.) and which were written, produced, and directed by -- by and large -- men (Lewton, Siodmak, Browning, Whale, Corman, Fisher, et al.). Horror films produced during that bygone era are my preference. I am not interested in horror films (or any films, for that matter) with a womanly perspective -- especially a feminist perspective . . . and agenda.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, EricJ said:

In the 70's, horror was grungy drive-in, with killers in the desert (because the filmmakers couldn't afford to shoot on location).

In the 80's, horror was slashers chasing teen cheerleaders and babysitters, because you could still make movies "just" for teens back then.

In the 90's, all those teens grew up, dreamed of buying rich yuppie apartments with their rich yuppie white-collar corporate-intern salaries, and afraid some...crazy stranger would take it all away from them!

In the 00's, we all had kids, and horror wasn't made for teens, but for your moms, worrying about protecting their perfect lil' trophy-toddler.

In the 10's, everyone bought real-estate, and horror fans got to watch their parents try to get ghosts and demonic presences out of their suburban fixer-upper.

Now, in the 20's, horror fans online want critical "validation", horror has to be "Metaphoric and disturbing" poetic allegories about race, motherhood or religion, and if an A24 movie doesn't either leave your head scratching or fanboys running to tell everyone "Watch this, it's so ICKY! 😛", then well, it's just not scary...

See the source image "YES!"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Quick comment - I find films too graphic today.  Leave it to the imagination

Last night, among other things, I re-watched Bells Are Ringing. 

Yeah, I get queasy watching movies about ring fighting. As someone who endured violent beatings/rape/mental cruelty I can wholeheartedly understand PTSD. I've gotten past it, just not entertained by watching it.

I so love Bells Are Ringing & have 2 Broadway cast LPs of it. I've often wanted to say "Su-sans-r-phone" on my answering machine. Where was the Corset Factory she worked? Schenectady? Cortland, NY is rehabbing their Corset Factory building.

cinch.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, Tikisoo said:

 

Man, how could you post that twice? I read all you wrote pretty much with my mouth open. Terrible.  I'm glad you've found a home here with us, your posts are always insightful & thoughtful. 

Which makes me wonder about the absolute weird nastiness I see among people on the internet-especially those who have grown up not knowing the real world without it. Do they have a complete disconnect to others' feelings? 

It's like high school on crack. You expect teenagers to be mean to each other, but by time you are 20 should have grown out of that, it's called maturity. I'm really afraid virtual "socialization" instead of real human face to face contact is what has been fueling all the anger & violence we see among younger people. They don't care about others as human beings but are just anonymous internet avatar pictures to them.

It's tragic, but no wonder that group didn't find a girl getting decapitated,  a person en flambe, sawing a head off or evil winning repugnant. What kind of person finds that entertaining?

Call us oldies, but if you can't find joy in this...

 

 

The double post was by accident; for some reason, when I submitted the reply, it hesitated for a minute, and then came up twice. Since it was lengthy and only needed to be said once, I simply had to write duplicate post. It would be nice if this website started having a button that could be utilized in such circumstances....

It might be hypocritical, given how much time I spend online and how I met some who were truly good and kind (especially here), but I agree that the internet has had an adverse effect on society. Part of it might be the algorithms of these websites; they create such an insular world of all one viewpoint, that when someone disagrees, it is far from pretty (Words on a computer can be taken in the mind of another in a way sometimes entirely different than the original intention). And when it spills into the everyday world, it gets worse. Part of it too might be the breakdown of shared interests, it used to be people would go in bigger numbers to the same churches, temples, et all, go to the same stores, were involved in the same community groups,  heard of and watched the same films and TV shows, read the same books, listened to much of the same music. That disappeared a while ago. Its absence is keenly felt..... Without any glue in the center or code of behavior, alienation and hostility take hold, and everyone pays.

The type of ugliness in Hereditary is one reason I don't often go for modern horror ( I recently dealt with one horror film from the early 1990s, but I checked out ahead of time that evil did not win and was not portrayed in a good light at all, and that much of it took a more cerebral approach. ) It was just too sick sounding, too excessive. For some reason, the studio that made it (Hereditary), A24, receives a weird cult-like adoration for almost every film they make, both horror and non-horror. My personal track record with them has been extremely mixed; films like The Farewell, Room, Lean On Pete, and 20th Century Women were very good independent cinema; on the other hand, many of their other films do not sound intriguing,  The Florida Project was extremely irritating, and Green Room was utterly vile.

I tend to prefer cinema that is more elvating, humane, gentle, sometimes spiritual; I do have a weakness for vintage film noir though and there are some dark hued films I think are fantastic (like Chinatown). I tend to like dramas, romances, classic comedy, and musicals.

As for that group, perhaps I should have initially left a few months earlier. One other young man (born 1991, I think) who was a  good, honest friend left that July, and never returned to that group. I think he had been the nicest one there. But maybe that group and the feeling of isolation afterwards helped me in the long run; it made me more able to cope with the chaos of 2020 and 2021 and it made me more humble and more humane. This place has helped too, the people here on the whole are  thoughtful, smart, witty, and very supportive to say nothing of cinema smarts. Its a wonderful community, mostly like a close knit family.

Thank you for that lovely scene from Funny Girl. A beautiful song, wonderful performance, terrific film. (And Bells are Ringing is a real charmer...) 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Escorted wifey last night to Top Gun: Maverick (2022).  Pretty crazy to know the stunts were all live action (other than explosions/crashes).  It was entertaining and paid the right amounts of homage to the first film and Iceman's return was done well.  Cheesy but good.  Also must say that the comparisons to Star Wars are pretty obvious.  The conflict at the end is almost identical.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

. . . Part of it too might be the breakdown of shared interests, it used to be people would go in bigger numbers to the same churches, temples, et all, go to the same stores, were involved in the same community groups,  heard of and watched the same films and TV shows, read the same books, listened to much of the same music. That disappeared a while ago. Its absence is keenly felt..... Without any glue in the center or code of behavior, alienation and hostility take hold, and everyone pays . . .

I don't see "the breakdown of shared interests" as a negative, bad thing.

Everyone sharing the same interests, watching the same films and TV shows, reading the same books, listening to the same music is not my idea of Heaven, Paradise, or Utopia. On the contrary, to me, that kind of Orwellian, Groupthink conformity is Hell!

Three cheers for Individualism, say I!

Or as the Frenchies say . . .

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRMjvLDOah9Nez1eWkNoxJ

Vive la différence!

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/18/2022 at 7:25 AM, Tikisoo said:

It's tragic, but no wonder that group didn't find a girl getting decapitated,  a person en flambe, sawing a head off or evil winning repugnant. What kind of person finds that entertaining?

Me.

I thought it was the best film of its year. 

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/18/2022 at 7:25 AM, Tikisoo said:

 

 

It's like high school on crack. You expect teenagers to be mean to each other, but by time you are 20 should have grown out of that, it's called maturity. I'm really afraid virtual "socialization" instead of real human face to face contact is what has been fueling all the anger & violence we see among younger people. They don't care about others as human beings but are just anonymous internet avatar pictures to them.

 

This seems like a discussion for some other page.  But I agree with what I quoted here.   What I didn't care for about "social media" was that by the time I gave it a try(and a short one at that)  I had been out of the eighth grade for 50 years and had no desire to go back.  It was even worse.  

And the anonymity frees one to post anything they wish about anybody they please without the possibility of getting smacked in the face.  And then you can always get "backed up" by all the others on FB who belong in your "clique" .  And I found there were a lot of them.  And the problem with it was that since so many people had accounts with the venue it was hard to avoid them.  

And I agree with this:

1 hour ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

I don't see "the breakdown of shared interests" as a negative, bad thing.

Everyone sharing the same interests, watching the same films and TV shows, reading the same books, listening to the same music is not my idea of Heaven, Paradise, or Utopia. On the contrary, to me, that kind of Orwellian, Groupthink conformity is Hell!

Three cheers for Individualism, say I!

 

 

 

We at least have that "shared interest" here in this forum and other forums we might belong to,   and in those I've never noticed any derogation aimed at those with differing opinions.  Except of course, on the "Off Topic" page here and in all those political threads, but no matter. 

Sure a lot of us don't mind hanging with some who might have differing points of view.  I've found some of them interesting at times.  But I don't need to worry about what I'm wearing, what music I like or other people I like  or what kind of movies I prefer not being approved by a whole lot of other people who feel I should live my life the way THEY think I should.  

Don't like or approve of the clothes I'm wearing?  Fine.  Then shut up and pull out your wallet and buy me what you approve of.  Otherwise,  b u g g e r off.  ;) 

Sepiatone

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Don't like or approve of the clothes I'm wearing?  Fine.  Then shut up and pull out your wallet and buy me what you approve of.  Otherwise,  b u g g e r off.  ;) 

 

Please do not even joke about such a thing.

One of my early employments here was working under a boss who believed herself an innovative social scientist and psychologist. One of her little experiments was to 'enhance' Secret Santa exchange by giving all of us gift cards to a local clothing store. The idea was that we were to purchase an outfit for the person whose name we drew. 

I choose for my victim the most innocuous style which I could find in colors which I had seen her wearing. I believe that it would at least serve her as an outfit of last resort when she had delayed doing laundry.

What was purchased for me was utter garbage. The colors were garish and I would never wear a neckline that low. The comment which accompanied it was that I must be more stylish and daring. They did not understand that they saw me only in a work environment of a naturally conservative business and that I was dressing appropriately.

I did find it interesting that comment cards a month later revealed that twelve of the 'gifts' had been donated to charity shop and what I had selected was one of the four which were kept. I did not reveal on the comment card that I had kept the outfit which I had been given but was using it as cleaning rags.

  • Haha 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...