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6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

BRANDO HAMMY? Why, HOW VERY DARE YOU?!

Where is my SHOCKED FACE? (rummages purse) Oh, that's right, it's been at the cleaners since I wore it out wearing it for 300 days straight back in 2016...

[forgive the sarcasm, it's all directed at MARLON, not you. i never miss the chance to give BRANDO  a ribbing because he DESERVES IT]

just a few years ago MARIA SCHNEIDER admitted there is a scene in this film where she is literally sexually violated onscreen [penetrated by BRANDO without permission and spontaneously], and as such, i just don't think I could EVER watch it...also, again, early career brilliance admitted- but UGH, WHAT A DESPICABLE FRUITCAKE OF A MAN BRANDO WAS!

I heard that story too, and admittedly with it on demand via Showtime, I fast forwarded through that particular scene. I think I remember reading that scene was conceived only hours before it was filmed, and while Scheider was informed at the last second, she like her character did not realize what she was getting into. I feel immense sorrow for her. Nobody deserves that. I might have to PM you about the film's very end, and why it seems almost like poetic justice.

 

In Brando's case, I think all the early attention from highbrow critics went to his head, and he really thought he was a genius superior to everyone. And while his ego might have dimmed a little bit in the 60s due to flop after flop (The Night of the Following Day is a dreadful film), Godfather and Last Tango brought it back worse than ever. And in the end ultimately, he ended up looking like Sidney Greenstreet, with few roles that worked out and him self-sabotaging some of the ones that did. He was a model alright.... for self-destruction.

6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

YOU'RE TOO YOUNG, I BELIEVE (oops, caps lock) to have seen KRULL in THE THEATER, but TRULY, it was an EXPERIENCE!

I made the kids I went to see it with MAD AS HELL because I thought it was much better than STAR WARS.

 

 

Yes, too young to see it in theatres, but I imagine it looked pretty great on the big screen. I did prefer the original Star Wars film to this, but this is probably comparable to Return of the Jedi that same year.

6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

LONG KISS GOODNIGHT, not last, but we're simpatico on GEENA DAVIS, and I really liked this one a lot when I saw it back then.

Whoops. It was late. Sorry about that. But it really is a superior action film. I don't know if Geena mentions it too much anymore (there has been a resurgence of interest in her the last few years, even though it would be even better if she was acting again), but Samuel L Jackson admitted in 2019 that it was his favorite of all the films he has done.

6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I dunno if you want to take the time to do a search and track it down, but when BABY DOLL first aired on TCM (maybe ever? maybe for the first time in a long time? maybe since the start of the message boards?) WE HAD A PRETTY LONG RUNNING THREAD ABOUT IT, where the results of the posters opinions at the time were: 90% "what the HELL did I just watch?" and 10% "I liked it."

the 10% side could've used you!

 

Well, it does at times play almost like a live action cartoon for adults. But if you enjoy heavily spiced eccentricity, it does work. Somewhat amazing though that it set off such a firestorm in 1956, as I hardly think it was meant to be taken seriously.

8 hours ago, Tikisoo said:

Holy Moly Pasta Fragioli!

I was intrigued by every one of your EIGHT choices here and was not disappointed by your relatively long post! I too have avoided those movies, (like Showgirls & Last Tango) just not really interested in watching sexual exploitations. I'm not a prude either, but when all that's talked about a movie is what is "shown" well -yawn- does it have an engaging story?

Thank you for posting your succinct impressions of all those movies-you know exactly what points to hit & how much to reveal!

tumblr_n2i91357D91s2wio8o1_500.gif

I know that post took a lot of time, thanks for writing it.

Thank you for your kind words here, and you are welcome.

With the risque films, it is almost inevitable that the most provocative elements get discussed the most. Indecent Proposal probably has more going on in the story and in depth than Showgirls, Last Tango, and 9½ Weeks, and that is probably due to not being focused as much on staging outrageous scenes.

Of those other three, it is strange because visually they are  to varying degrees exploitative, while on another level being acutely aware of the wanton destructiveness inherent within. The difference between them ultimately is that 9½ is ultimately about the devastating mental strain put on Kim Basinger' s character from the effects an abusive and extremely controlled relationship (the film is told from her perspective),  Showgirls involves exhibitionists who use their bodies as a way to lead up the ladder of success while being very cynical about it all, while Last Tango grasps only in its last act the whole ramifications of things, as too often it is overly indulgent of Brando's repellent character.

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15 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

1.  I might have to PM you about [LAST TANGO IN PARIS'S] very end, and why it seems almost like poetic justice.

2. In Brando's case, I think all the early attention from highbrow critics went to his head, and he really thought he was a genius superior to everyone. ... he ended up looking like Sidney Greenstreet, with few roles that worked out and him self-sabotaging some of the ones that did. He was a model alright.... for self-destruction.

3. [RE: LONG/LAST KISS GOODNIGHT] Whoops. It was late. Sorry about that. But it really is a superior action film. I don't know if Geena mentions it too much anymore (there has been a resurgence of interest in her the last few years, even though it would be even better if she was acting again), but Samuel L Jackson admitted in 2019 that it was his favorite of all the films he has done.

1. FEEL FREE, ALTHOUGH, if you are worried about "spoiling" the ending of LAST TANGO for the board: don't. Years ago, I revealed the ending to MANDINGO and a longtime poster (and friend)  got miffed and was like "SPOILER WARNING NEXT TIME???" and usually I am very apologetic, but in this case I stood my ground because some films are like 6-month milk: AIN'T NUTHIN I CAN DO TO SPOIL IT ANY MORE THAN IT ALREADY IS AND IF ANYTHING, I AM DOING YOU A FAVOR BY LETTING YOU KNOW THE LEVELS OF FOULNESS IT HAS REACHED!!!!

2. HOW VERY DARE YOU!!!!? SYDNEY GREENSTREET WAS A DEEPLY, DEEPLY SEXY MAN!!!!!

See the source image

3. That's interesting that SAM JACKSON feels that about LONG KISS, I like it an awful lot too, but damn Dude- you were brilliant in DJANGO UNCHAINED.....I really enjoyed LONG KISS so much in 1996 that I decided to dye my hair like GEENA DAVIS'S CHARACTER. That is when I was reminded that FILMS LIE especially on the topic of QUICK MOTEL BATHROOM MAKEOVERS.

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⇧ I watched "The Hucksters" recently where Greenstreet creates quite a memorable and despicable character. Sexy, though? You're on your own with that call. 😀

greenstreetspit.gif

"The Hucksters" is a really good movie, and an even better book. The movie might even qualify for the category of (thinking about @TopBilled's excellent thread) a neglected classic. I know he has specific criteria, I'm just talking about it qualitatively as I rarely hear it brought up in discussions here and other places that talk about old movies. 

 

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3 hours ago, Fading Fast said:

⇧ I watched "The Hucksters" recently where Greenstreet creates quite a memorable and despicable character. Sexy, though? You're on your own with that call. 😀

greenstreetspit.gif

"The Hucksters" is a really good movie, and an even better book. The movie might even qualify for the category of (thinking about @TopBilled's excellent thread) a neglected classic. I know he has specific criteria, I'm just talking about it qualitatively as I rarely hear it brought up in discussions here and other places that talk about old movies. 

 

Alas, this movie may not be at the top of the list. But that clip of Clark Gable smashing Stanley's head with water is quite commonly viewed and talked about. I think it's Clark's best moment of movie still photography.

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12 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Alas, this movie may not be at the top of the list. But that clip of Clark Gable smashing Stanley's head with water is quite commonly viewed and talked about. I think it's Clark's best moment of movie still photography.

In the "spitting" scene, I love Gable's expression of controlled disgust at Greenstreet. You can hear what he's thinking, "you're a disgusting pig."

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While the City Sleeps (1928) poster.jpg

While The City Sleeps (1928) Youtube-7/10

A tough police detective (Lon Chaney) is determined to nail a slick criminal but can never get enough evidence.

A very good silent crime melodrama. Now that I figured out to get Youtube on my TV, I am able to watch some hard to find films I always wanted to see. In the coming days and weeks I will try to see films by my favorite horror/villain actors (Chaney, Bela Lugosi, Boris Karloff, Peter Lorre, Lon Chaney Jr. and Vincent Price) that I never saw before. This one was very interesting with Chaney on the side of law and order for a change. Like so many of his films he is obsessed with a younger woman that does not feel the same way about him. There is also some brutal gunfights. Definitely worth seeing for fans of Chaney or crime films.

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9 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

If that's true then Anne Ramsey was a babe.

image.jpeg.a538a1e70db4a35de3ba36d6188f407c.jpeg

Supposedly there's nobody who doesn't look good to somebody...supposedly....

Since my condo building's annual meeting was rescheduled to tonight, I was not able to observe Silent Film Day by going to AFI Silver to watch the recently restored The Spanish Dancer (1923). So at home, while waiting for the meeting to start, I watched...

Hell-Bound Train (1930, Gist & Gist)

Eloyce and James Gist were husband-and-wife evangelists/self-taught filmmakers who made this film to illustrate the many vices besieging Black communities (drink, jazz music and dancing, gambling, etc. etc. etc.) in amateurishly shot and staged vignettes. The sinners are depicted as earning themselves one-way tickets on an express train straight to H-E-|-|, with Satan himself as the conductor. The Gists traveled from church to church for decades, screening this and their other films for church audiences. Now while the production and performances are strictly amateur hour, it is a fascinating portrait of African-American communities, right then and there being undercut by many of these practices.

The Library of Congress restored the film from material from the Gists' estate; Kino Lorber issued it as part of the Pioneers of African American Cinema (2015) compilation. This and other films from the compilation are available on the Criterion Channel, where I watched it.

 

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6 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

While The City Sleeps (1928) Youtube-7/10 . . .

IMO, While the City Sleeps is the template for many crime-dramas and police procedurals that followed it. As is Chaney's performance as the hard-boiled detective Dan Coghlan. I see some of his physical mannerisms later in tough guys portrayed by Wallace Beery, Humphrey Bogart, Stanley Fields, Victor McLaglen, Paul Muni, Lloyd Nolan, and Edward G. Robinson.

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Hi, everyone! I am emerging from Computer Hell--did someone do a cake like that on Halloween Wars? they should!--with a new Mac, allegedly much easier to use than a PC. Hah, and again hah!

Since Lorna was missing my making an unkind comment about Brando and/or Last Tango: That's a film I've never seen. At the time I avoided Last Tango and Straw Dogs on the policy that if the favorable reviews make a film sound ridiculous, maybe I should avoid it! Someday I'll get around to Last Tango. 

But I will pass on this great comment from the critic Stanley Kauffmann. He had seen the movie in New York, but he was in Paris, and decided to see the film again there. It was shown with French subtitles, so he could tell that Brando's last line in the film was "Nos enfants"--"Our children." Seeing the film in NY without subtitles, he had thought that Brando said "Ouch!"

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7 hours ago, King Rat said:

Hi, everyone! I am emerging from Computer Hell--did someone do a cake like that on Halloween Wars? they should!--with a new Mac, allegedly much easier to use than a PC. Hah, and again hah!

Since Lorna was missing my making an unkind comment about Brando and/or Last Tango: That's a film I've never seen. At the time I avoided Last Tango and Straw Dogs on the policy that if the favorable reviews make a film sound ridiculous, maybe I should avoid it! Someday I'll get around to Last Tango. 

But I will pass on this great comment from the critic Stanley Kauffmann. He had seen the movie in New York, but he was in Paris, and decided to see the film again there. It was shown with French subtitles, so he could tell that Brando's last line in the film was "Nos enfants"--"Our children." Seeing the film in NY without subtitles, he had thought that Brando said "Ouch!"

I truly want to believe that at 3 AM West Coast time you woke from a dead slumber and sat straight up in bed.

And your husband was like:

”Honey what is it?!”

and you said:

“Someone is talking **** about BRANDO. I’m needed…”

ps- You’re really missing out on STRAW DOGS though, I love love love that movie. It’s worth watching for the late David Warner’s performance alone.

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10 hours ago, Eucalyptus P. Millstone said:

As is Chaney's performance as the hard-boiled detective Dan Coghlan. I see some of his physical mannerisms later in tough guys portrayed by Wallace Beery, Humphrey Bogart, Stanley Fields, Victor McLaglen, Paul Muni, Lloyd Nolan, and Edward G.

Yes, I can see that as well. Plus when we finally got to hear his gruff sounding voice in the talkie version of The Unholy Three (1930), it showed he could have been cast in gangster roles like Little Caesar or Scarface if he had lived.

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MV5BY2FjNzE3ZjMtMTZhNy00NGVkLTgxMmYtZWFk

The Scapegoat from 1959 with Alec Guinness, Bette Davis, Pamela Brown, Annabel Bartlett, Nicole Maurey and Geoffrey Keen

 
 
The Scapegoat is a gem of a little movie with an impressive cast and a neat twist on the "twins switch roles in life" story. 
 
It does gloss over some plot flaws, but most movies ask for a little suspension of disbelief in return for thought-provoking entertainment. In The Scapegoat, director Robert Hammer, using a Daphne Du Maurier novel as source material, holds up his end of that bargain.
 
Alec Guinness plays a staid and bored-with-his-lonely-life English professor of the French language who, while vacationing in France, meets his exact twin, a French nobleman, played of course, by Guinness as well. 
 
You just have to accept this never-explained unbelievable coincidence, while watching Guinness  the nobleman seize the opportunity to trick Guinness the English professor into assuming his identity.
 
With the excuse of some form of temporary schizophrenia provided by nobleman Guinness, professor Guinness, in one day, finds himself the head of a troubled aristocratic French family comprising a disaffected alcoholic wife, a bitter spinster sister, a domineering mother, a mistress pushing for more out of her relationship with Guinness, a precocious daughter, a failing family business and a dead-patriarch's will that sets the family members against each other. 
 
Professor Guinness, now in the middle of a tempest, is no longer bored with his life. As he tries to understand the history and nuances of all these family ties, this thoughtful man, grateful to have, for the moment anyway, a family and home, also begins trying to solve some of the family's problems with compassion.
 
The fun here is, first, the fish-out-of-water aspect of the story as an English professor struggles to acclimate himself to a French nobleman's world. One wonders if professor Guinness had any female companionship in his "before" life, as he now finds himself with both a wife and a libidinal mistress. 
 
The other very enjoyable aspect of the story is how professor Guinness' kind approach, which clearly his predecessor doppelganger did not employ, immediately improves the lives of those around him and even gives the family business a fighting chance. 
 
The climax has a couple of twists as, of course, nobleman Guinness had a nefarious reason for effacing himself for a while, but when he wants back in, professor Guinness is not willing to just go away quietly.
 
The Scapegoat works because Guinness is just that good at playing two distinct personalities, one of which is stressed by being dropped into an extreme situation. 
 
Guinness, though, isn't alone here, as Bette Davis as the cranky matriarch, Pamela Brown as the angry spinster, Annabel Bartlett as the spirited daughter, Nicole Maurey as the frisky mistress and Geoffrey Keen as the loyal butler all draw you into this sometimes hard-to-believe story.
 
British movies in the 1950s relied on stories and personalities (and incredibly crisp and beautiful black and white cinematography) to captivate the viewer as English studios didn't have Hollywood-sized budgets. 
 
In The Scapegoat, we see again how a smart story - an original twist on a classic plot - put over by talented actors, can create an engaging movie that outshines many big-budget efforts that often rely too much on special effects and histrionics. As always, nothing beats a good tale, well told.   
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On 9/28/2022 at 10:25 AM, Det Jim McLeod said:

]Desiree.jpg

Desiree (1954) Youtube-5/10

The life of a young seamstress (Jean Simmons) who was once engaged to Napoleon Bonaparte (Marlon Brando).

This film was hard to find but it is in a good print on Youtube. I wanted to see it because it was the only 1950s Brando film I had not seen. Brando seems pretty bored with his role, probably because he was contractually obligated to make it. Jean Simmons is the real star here and she is very good.  She and Brando would reunite in a much better film Guys And Dolls, the next year. This one is worth seeing once, mostly for Brando completists, the color (it was also Brando's first color film) and costumes look beautiful, but the film is very talky and although about generals and war, there are no battle scenes.

For what it's worth, this is one of the movies that FXM is pulling out of its vaults to start running to death during the final quarter of 2022.  Its first airing will be Oct. 6, but FXM will be bringing some surprisingly good movies out to show for the first time in years starting tomorrow (Oct. 1).  These include Emperor of the North tomorrow (and several more times over the next two weeks), The St. Valentine's Day Massacre, and Trouble Man.

There's also a couple of surprisingly old movies coming back.  There's the very early Gregory Peck movie The Keys of the Kingdom, which I believe starts showing up on Oct. 7; the early Linda Darnell comedy Day-Time Wife, Shirley Temple in Susannah of the Mounties, and the 1935 version of The Call of the Wild.

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On 9/24/2022 at 12:43 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

YOU NEED TO SEE IT AGAIN.

IT'S LIKE OLIVES OR QUAIL EGGS OR CAVIAR...AT FIRST YOU JUST DON'T KNOW what to make of it, BUT SOON YOU ACQUIRE THE TASTE....

WILL LEARN TO EMBRACE THE FILTH.

Showgirls might be the only film where the censored-for-TV version makes it even more entertaining. 

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More assorted notes about films recently seen.....

The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (1987) is a quiet heartbreaker of a film with a magnificent central performance from Maggie Smith. She plays a middle-aged spinster circa 1950, taken to giving piano lessons after the death of her tyrannical aunt (Wendy Hiller). She has sophisticated airs, but she knows she is a joke to almost all others, which causes her to privately drink too much. The film uncompromisingly looks at what happens as everything caves in on her as she mistakes attention from an amoral fortune hunter (Bob Hoskins) to be true love and how she briefly rages against the God she loves (in a truly horrifying scene) for her predicament. It's very somber, but Maggie Smith is note perfect here, in what might be the best performance of her career, and the film itself is tremendously effective and moving.

Employees' Entrance (1933) is another of the famed WB/First National B-films of the early 30s, saucy, brief, and snappy. Warren William plays the tough head of a department store who develops romantic feelings for a secretly married worker played by Loretta Young. The plot is very thin, but in typical WB fashion, its the amazing speed and the quirkiness of the diologue, combined with the star personalities which make it work.

On the opposite end of the speed spectrum is 1996's Tin Cup. This too is a WB film, but if a different era, and boy, could it use the old Jack Warner era pacing. Its a sports film with romantic comedy trappings, as down and out Kevin Costner attempts to woo Rene Russo away from her boyfriend Don Johnson as he prepares for the US Open. The leads have fine chemistry, the diologue has some nice bantering, it is very likable overall .... but the runtime is nearly impossible to deal with. A fluffy, light film like this should be somewhere between 90 and 105 minutes, and this one draws everything out to a wearying 135 minutes, far too lethargic for a film that doesn't have any real plot twists or much depth. This ultimately has to qualify as a near miss, although it would have made it if it was faster.

Moscow on the Hudson (1984) appeared in a period of time, which, like today, had very hostile relations between the US and Russia. And yet, with Robin Williams leading the film as a Russian circus member who defects in the middle of Bloomingdales, the film was a moderate hit at the time. Its a bittersweet comedy-drama, with Williams a bit more low-key than usual. The film satirizes elements both in Russia and in the U.S, and there is an interesting element in that almost everyone Williams encounters in New York is an immigrant from somewhere else. The film is gentle and good-hearted, but it too deserves to be tightened up a little bit.I

Europa Europa (1990) is a disturbing film that shows that truth is stranger and more alarming than fiction. This is the true-life story of Salomon Perel, a Jewish man who survived WWII through a series of outrageous coincidences, ironies, and outright flukes. He even posed for a long time as part of the notoriously evil Hitler Youth, with virtually nobody catching on about his real heritage. The film is gripping and haunting and quite terrifying because he comes so close to exposure and death so many times, and we want him to survive, even if he did pose as a member of two heinous movements (before the German phase, he had been in a militant Soviet orphanage). It is a bit jarring that there is so much full-frontal nudity from the leading character (the actor was about 20 or 21 when this was filmed, but he's almost always playing underage), but otherwise, the film's dark story envelops without a hitch.

And then there is Mary Reilly (1996). In the 1990s, this was a notorious debacle, a $45 million dollar film that only brought in $5 million, a film where the leading lady (Julia Roberts) was slammed in almost every corner for dropping her character's accent briefly at several points to go back to her usual diction style, and one that met with mostly terrible reviews, Razzie nominations, and a studio that disowned making it. I also know that it is greatly disliked by several members here. So, it comes as a shock that this variant on the famous horror tale of Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde is actually an exceptional film. There are some horror visuals here (a severed head dripping blood, a vicious murder involving a walking stick, the famed transformation, saved for the very end of the film), but this is a film that veers closer to being a Victorian Gothic melodrama, with elements that reminded me of 1984's Mrs. Soffel, and, in terms of unrequited romance, The Remains of the Day. The Mary Reilly of the title , played by Roberts, works as a maid in Jeckyll's (John Malkovich) house. In spite of the wandering accent, this is probably Roberts' bravest performance, as here, with ashen skin and very few of her trademark qualities, she melts into her role in a way that is almost relevatory. There are times when it is hard to remember who it is on screen. John Malkovich gives a typically good, creepy performance as the famed split personality, and the film itself is remarkable in its dank look that emphasizes dark brick and thick fog (it's like the London of the darkest bits of Dickens, right down to the meat slaughterhouse in the middle of the open street), and it receives confident handling from director Stephen Frears and writer Christopher Hampton, the same team behind 1988's Dangerous Liaisons. The film is not fast paced, but is mostly internalized, but the film is able to pull that off well. Aside from about a 30 second bit near the end, there is rarely a false seeming moment in the film. Hugely underrated, and worth a second look.
 

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I enjoyed The Girl in the Red Velvet Swing. Costumes and color cinematography alone would have made this worth seeing, but hey, there's Joan Collins, who can even do a passable American accent. Ray Milland is effectively cast as Stanford White, and if Farley Granger is playing a crazy bad guy, better the rich Harry Thaw than the neighborhood punk in The Naked Street. Props to Dave Karger for asking Joan if she liked working with Glenda Farrell; I wouldn't have guessed that Karger knew who she was. Joan apparently liked working with all her co-stars on the film, and said that Glenda Farrell gave her a couple of acting tips. Joan was impressed by getting to work with Cornelia Otis Skinner.

I Died a Thousand Times was a surprisingly close color remake of High Sierra. Some good location cinematography. Unfortunately, the parts of the story that might have been improved or dropped: the Clubfoot Velma subplot; Pard the dog; and an objectionable stereotype (Hispanic instead of African-American, as in the original)--are all there. Velma's folks are now Joad family imitations. I'd have liked to see more of Lee Marvin and Earl Holliman and less of this. Jack Palance is actually quite good in the Bogart role, and the acting honors are all his. Shelley Winters is more than adequate as Marie, but not on a par with Ida Lupino. Shelley does get to dance the mambo, shaking the booty she has so much less of than she will in future years. Not a bad film, but could easily have been better.

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12 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Yes, I can see that as well. Plus when we finally got to hear his gruff sounding voice in the talkie version of The Unholy Three (1930), it showed he could have been cast in gangster roles like Little Caesar or Scarface if he had lived.

Some speculations of how Lon Chaney's career might have developed had he not died in 1930 generally have him precluding the stardoms of Bela Lugosi, Boris Karloff, and his son "Lon Chaney, Jr."  Aimless wool-gathering, IMO. First and foremost, Chaney was under contract to MGM. Whether MGM would have loaned one of its top stars to Universal Pictures for Dracula and Frankenstein seems highly unlikely to me.

Secondly, I'm not so sure that Chaney would have confined and anchored himself to horror movies. I think that he would have developed into a character actor who played a wide range of roles in a wide variety of genres -- similar to the roles he played and movies he played in early in his career. I agree with you, Det Jim McLeod, that Chaney could have been cast in gangster roles. I could also envision him in westerns, war movies, and even treacle such as the Andy Hardy series.

Lon Chaney as "Judge Hardy"? Perhaps 'twas a blessing that "The Man of a Thousand Faces" was taken so "young" and spared so ignominious a fate!

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The Strange Love of Martha Ivers has an excellent new 4K restoration from Kino Lorber which makes up for the plethora of public domain prints obscuring its quality. It's the first time I felt completely focused with it.

Still not a Lizbeth Scott fan, but found the rest of the cast so very good.

But the REAL revelation is the newly-restored Rain. It also came out this week and looks sensational. I think it's one of Crawford's best pieces of work, very nuanced and cinematic. It has always been dismissed by critics and fans alike, but this 91 minute version ( as opposed to the frequently-seen 75 minute version) packs a wallop.

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Cast a Dark Shadow (1955), crime story.

It was a so-so movie for me until a big character reveal. Once that happened, I ended up liking it. 
 

Overall, I enjoyed the characters more than the plot though. 

My favourite was Margaret Lockwood as the second wife. There was lots of personality written into the character, and it was delivered with great energy by the actress. I really want to see her in something else, probably an earlier performance.

Dirk Bogarde I knew by name only. He also did well in a not so sympathetic part. I understand he was an early heartthrob in England. Curious to see him in a role unlike the one in this movie. 

Kathleen Harrison played the quirky maid. I really liked the character and hated that the character was thought of as stupid!

When seeing a black and white film it drives me up a wall if the whites are too harsh or the blacks too grey. Not the case here. Really nicely filmed and/or printed.

Usually I don't care much for a movie that looks a bit like a play, but this time I wasn't bothered. Go figure🤷
 


 

 

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On 9/24/2022 at 2:43 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

YOU NEED TO SEE IT AGAIN.

IT'S LIKE OLIVES OR QUAIL EGGS OR CAVIAR...AT FIRST YOU JUST DON'T KNOW what to make of it, BUT SOON YOU ACQUIRE THE TASTE....

WILL LEARN TO EMBRACE THE FILTH.

Showgirls.gif

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