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13 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Showgirls might be the only film where the censored-for-TV version makes it even more entertaining. 

“FLIP you you FLIPPING HOOKER”

”no, FLIP YOU, YOU FLIPPING HOOKER!!!!”

(Meanwhile 100% of the background action is pixelated)

(It kind of brings to mind Martin Scorsese’s rant from that  TCM commercial about letterboxing – “what are you doing here is *technically* redirecting the film!!”)

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8 hours ago, Grumpytoad said:

When seeing a black and white film it drives me up a wall if the whites are too harsh or the blacks too grey.

Your TV picture can be changed to "theater mode" that will instantly soften the contrast.  Sony TV  remotes have a "Picture Mode" button that makes switching modes easier than going into general settings. 

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18 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Showgirls might be the only film where the censored-for-TV version makes it even more entertaining. 

I love the TV edits of Repo Man ("Flip you! Flip you, you flippin' melon farmer.") and Snakes on a Plane ("I have had it with these monkey-fighting snakes on this Monday-to-Friday plane!") for just that reason.

And on the Movies! channel I once watched the ending of All That Jazz, full of bleeped obscenities and pixilated nudity. It seemed almost pointless to make a TV edit of that film.

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9 minutes ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

I love the TV edits of Repo Man ("Flip you! Flip you, you flippin' melon farmer.") and Snakes on a Plane ("I have had it with these monkey-fighting snakes on this Monday-to-Friday plane!") for just that reason.

And on the Movies! channel I once watched the ending of All That Jazz, full of bleeped obscenities and pixilated nudity. It seemed almost pointless to make a TV edit of that film.

MELON FARMER?!?!?!

🤣😂OMG, I’m dying!!!!!
(Yes, yes I know what it’s standing in for)

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24 minutes ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

I love the TV edits of Repo Man ("Flip you! Flip you, you flippin' melon farmer.") and Snakes on a Plane ("I have had it with these monkey-fighting snakes on this Monday-to-Friday plane!") for just that reason.

And on the Movies! channel I once watched the ending of All That Jazz, full of bleeped obscenities and pixilated nudity. It seemed almost pointless to make a TV edit of that film.

The TV edit of THE EXORCIST is interesting . . .

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Postal Inspector.jpg

Postal Inspector (1936) Youtube -6/10

An inspector for the post office (Ricardo Cortez) deals with mail fraud, a robbery and a huge flood.

This was a cheap second feature which I saw because it was a Bela Lugosi film I had never seen before. Bela's role is very small as a shady night club owner who is behind the robbery. There are other things that made this short film (58 min) quite entertaining. Patricia Ellis , an actress I never saw before, plays a night club singer and she has a nice voice. The songs she sings have hilarious titles- "Hot Towel" and "Let's Have Bluebirds On All Our Wallpaper", Another treat was Hattie McDaniel as Ellis' maid who sings the 'Hot Towel" song with her. There are funny scenes as Cortez has fraud victims coming in and showing him the crazy schemes they fell for over the mail.

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37 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Postal Inspector.jpg

Postal Inspector (1936) Youtube -6/10

An inspector for the post office (Ricardo Cortez) deals with mail fraud, a robbery and a huge flood.

This was a cheap second feature which I saw because it was a Bela Lugosi film I had never seen before. Bela's role is very small as a shady night club owner who is behind the robbery. There are other things that made this short film (58 min) quite entertaining. Patricia Ellis , an actress I never saw before, plays a night club singer and she has a nice voice. The songs she sings have hilarious titles- "Hot Towel" and "Let's Have Bluebirds On All Our Wallpaper", Another treat was Hattie McDaniel as Ellis' maid who sings the 'Hot Towel" song with her. There are funny scenes as Cortez has fraud victims coming in and showing him the crazy schemes they fell for over the mail.

Nice write-up. I've watched many movies for similar reasons. Patricia Ellis is a good actress and quite a cutie who pops up in a bunch of '30s movies, but for whatever reason, she never made to the A-list. I'll now keep an eye out for "Postal Inspector." 

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I’m not going to start a whole new thread for this but man am I irked. 
 
For the ***third time*** now, both WATCH TCM and TCM on DEMAND  have claimed that the 1941 Peter Lorre thriller THE FACE BEHIND THE MASK was showing, When in fact it is a short film about Louis the 14th being held in captivity.

(For both, the thumbnail used is the lobby card of the Peter Lorre film)

I WANT TO SEE THIS MOVIE AND I AM IRKED, Please stop getting my hopes up and then letting me down TCM.

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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1938)

Producer David O. Selznick's affectionate, meticulously detailed adaption of Mark Twain's famous tale remains a charming ode to a nostalgic glimpse at mid 19th Century childhood. Richly produced, William Cameron Menzies's art direction impressively captures in Technicolor the atmosphere of small town Americana, with his cave sequence at the film's end (where Tom and Becky get lost) remaining a humdinger.

And the casting, I have to say, adds immeasurably to the film's success. Tommy Kelly is good natured childhood  mischievousness personified as that rapscallion Tom. His charming, winning portrayal is the centrepiece of the film. Generally speaking I'm not a fan of child actors during the studio era but I find it impossible not to like Kelly in his role.

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer Blu-ray

But there are other memorable casting turns, as well, including young David Holt as Sid, Tom's bratty half brother, forever informing upon Tom with a smile on his face and crying out, "Aunt Polly!", running to her every time Tom seeks vengeance upon him. Victor Jory is a mean, intimidating Injun Joe (his gloating smiling face as he scales some rocks at the film's climax to try to kill Tom will be a nightmare inducing image for many kids).

Traumafession:: Dustin in Minnesota on Tom Sawyer (1938) | kindertrauma

Ann Gillis is a charming Becky Thatcher and her childhood flirtatious relationship with Tom is winning. Then there's Olin Howland, as the nasty schoolmaster Mr. Dobbins who heavily believes in corporal punishment for any child in his class he believes misbehaves. He prospers on intimidation and while the portrayal may be a caricature (not a lot of subtlety here) he remains a memorable villain.

Olin Howland

Jackie Moran is a winning Huckleberry Finn and Walter Brennan scores well as M uff Potter, the town drunk convinced by that nasty Injun Joe that he was responsible for a graveyard murder Joe himself committed.

But I must express special praise for May Robson as Aunt Polly. Seen early in the film as cantankerous and ever ready to crack down on Tom (with either a thump in the head or a spoonful of castor oil) we later see her remorseful and in tears when she mistakenly believes that her Tom has died. Robson brings a sentimental warmth to her periodically testy Aunt Polly that makes her characterization truly endearing. Robson was one of Hollywood's premiere character actresses and her performance in this film remains one of the highlights of her career. She also appears in the film's final scene, which she turns into one of the hilarious highlight moments of the entire production.

  The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1938)  The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1938) - IMDb

Selznick's screenplay makes some alterations to what he considered to be structural weaknesses in Twain's novel. That is usually a recipe for winning the scorn of literary purists but this production works well. Tom's hoodwinking of child mates into white washing his picket fence for him is recreated here, as well as his romance with young Becky and running off to the Mississippi River to become a "pirate."

Delightful as Tommy Kelly is in the lead role he never had much of a follow up on this film as a child actor. He later became a school teacher and, unfortunately, refused to talk about his life as an actor. However he would marry, father six children and live to 90, leaving us just six years ago. It certainly sounds like he had a good, productive life post-Hollywood. And, on top of that, of course, he has left movie fans his winning performance as Mark Twain's perennial youth.

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (United Artists, 1938). Herald (5.75" | Lot  #26008 | Heritage Auctions

3 out of 4

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22 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

HA!!!!

Thank you, LornaHansonForbes, for the link to the YouTube video . . . the quality of which ain't "great," IMO.

Here are links offering -- to my eyes -- vastly superior presentations:

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51 minutes ago, Eucalyptus P. Millstone said:

Thank you, LornaHansonForbes, for the link to the YouTube video . . . the quality of which ain't "great," IMO.

Here are links offering -- to my eyes -- vastly superior presentations:

yeah, once i started watching i could see the quality was eh....but it could've been way worse!

i had forgotten I had seen this movie already, I rememebered because PETER LORRE with the mask on looks a lot like JULIE ANDREWS IN VICTOR/VICTORIA.

Not too bad a little movie though, and EVELYN KEYES was a real charmer.

See the source image

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On 9/30/2022 at 5:41 PM, CinemaInternational said:

 

More assorted notes about films recently seen.....

The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (1987) is a quiet heartbreaker of a film with a magnificent central performance from Maggie Smith. She plays a middle-aged spinster circa 1950, taken to giving piano lessons after the death of her tyrannical aunt (Wendy Hiller). She has sophisticated airs, but she knows she is a joke to almost all others, which causes her to privately drink too much. The film uncompromisingly looks at what happens as everything caves in on her as she mistakes attention from an amoral fortune hunter (Bob Hoskins) to be true love and how she briefly rages against the God she loves (in a truly horrifying scene) for her predicament. It's very somber, but Maggie Smith is note perfect here, in what might be the best performance of her career, and the film itself is tremendously effective and moving.

Employees' Entrance (1933) is another of the famed WB/First National B-films of the early 30s, saucy, brief, and snappy. Warren William plays the tough head of a department store who develops romantic feelings for a secretly married worker played by Loretta Young. The plot is very thin, but in typical WB fashion, its the amazing speed and the quirkiness of the diologue, combined with the star personalities which make it work.

On the opposite end of the speed spectrum is 1996's Tin Cup. This too is a WB film, but if a different era, and boy, could it use the old Jack Warner era pacing. Its a sports film with romantic comedy trappings, as down and out Kevin Costner attempts to woo Rene Russo away from her boyfriend Don Johnson as he prepares for the US Open. The leads have fine chemistry, the diologue has some nice bantering, it is very likable overall .... but the runtime is nearly impossible to deal with. A fluffy, light film like this should be somewhere between 90 and 105 minutes, and this one draws everything out to a wearying 135 minutes, far too lethargic for a film that doesn't have any real plot twists or much depth. This ultimately has to qualify as a near miss, although it would have made it if it was faster.

Moscow on the Hudson (1984) appeared in a period of time, which, like today, had very hostile relations between the US and Russia. And yet, with Robin Williams leading the film as a Russian circus member who defects in the middle of Bloomingdales, the film was a moderate hit at the time. Its a bittersweet comedy-drama, with Williams a bit more low-key than usual. The film satirizes elements both in Russia and in the U.S, and there is an interesting element in that almost everyone Williams encounters in New York is an immigrant from somewhere else. The film is gentle and good-hearted, but it too deserves to be tightened up a little bit.I

Europa Europa (1990) is a disturbing film that shows that truth is stranger and more alarming than fiction. This is the true-life story of Salomon Perel, a Jewish man who survived WWII through a series of outrageous coincidences, ironies, and outright flukes. He even posed for a long time as part of the notoriously evil Hitler Youth, with virtually nobody catching on about his real heritage. The film is gripping and haunting and quite terrifying because he comes so close to exposure and death so many times, and we want him to survive, even if he did pose as a member of two heinous movements (before the German phase, he had been in a militant Soviet orphanage). It is a bit jarring that there is so much full-frontal nudity from the leading character (the actor was about 20 or 21 when this was filmed, but he's almost always playing underage), but otherwise, the film's dark story envelops without a hitch.

And then there is Mary Reilly (1996). In the 1990s, this was a notorious debacle, a $45 million dollar film that only brought in $5 million, a film where the leading lady (Julia Roberts) was slammed in almost every corner for dropping her character's accent briefly at several points to go back to her usual diction style, and one that met with mostly terrible reviews, Razzie nominations, and a studio that disowned making it. I also know that it is greatly disliked by several members here. So, it comes as a shock that this variant on the famous horror tale of Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde is actually an exceptional film. There are some horror visuals here (a severed head dripping blood, a vicious murder involving a walking stick, the famed transformation, saved for the very end of the film), but this is a film that veers closer to being a Victorian Gothic melodrama, with elements that reminded me of 1984's Mrs. Soffel, and, in terms of unrequited romance, The Remains of the Day. The Mary Reilly of the title , played by Roberts, works as a maid in Jeckyll's (John Malkovich) house. In spite of the wandering accent, this is probably Roberts' bravest performance, as here, with ashen skin and very few of her trademark qualities, she melts into her role in a way that is almost relevatory. There are times when it is hard to remember who it is on screen. John Malkovich gives a typically good, creepy performance as the famed split personality, and the film itself is remarkable in its dank look that emphasizes dark brick and thick fog (it's like the London of the darkest bits of Dickens, right down to the meat slaughterhouse in the middle of the open street), and it receives confident handling from director Stephen Frears and writer Christopher Hampton, the same team behind 1988's Dangerous Liaisons. The film is not fast paced, but is mostly internalized, but the film is able to pull that off well. Aside from about a 30 second bit near the end, there is rarely a false seeming moment in the film. Hugely underrated, and worth a second look.
 

Thank you for both Employees and Moscow. First one very good pre-code.

And though its been decades since I saw it, I recall Moscow as being quite touching.

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On 9/30/2022 at 9:27 PM, Leighcat said:

The Strange Love of Martha Ivers has an excellent new 4K restoration from Kino Lorber which makes up for the plethora of public domain prints obscuring its quality. It's the first time I felt completely focused with it.

Still not a Lizbeth Scott fan, but found the rest of the cast so very good.

But the REAL revelation is the newly-restored Rain. It also came out this week and looks sensational. I think it's one of Crawford's best pieces of work, very nuanced and cinematic. It has always been dismissed by critics and fans alike, but this 91 minute version ( as opposed to the frequently-seen 75 minute version) packs a wallop.

Where did you see the restoration of Strange Love? I've always wanted to compare restored films with unrestored. It's all over the streaming services but I can't tell which ones have which.

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On 10/1/2022 at 7:08 AM, Tikisoo said:

Your TV picture can be changed to "theater mode" that will instantly soften the contrast.  Sony TV  remotes have a "Picture Mode" button that makes switching modes easier than going into general settings. 

Thanks. I have a different brand but was able to tinker with the contrast in the settings. It helped.

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A4qt.gif

Roman Holiday from 1953 with Audrey Hepburn, Gregory Peck and Eddie Albert
 
 
The story of a young, pretty princes breaking out from her royal gilded cage for a day-or-so-long rumspringa, where she meets a regular guy, falls in love and then has to choose between the life of duty she was born into or following her heart, come what may, was not a new tale in 1953 and has been retold in endless variations ever since. 
 
In 1953's Roman Holiday, though, director William Wyler, along with co-stars Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck, with an assist from the city of Rome itself, created the definitive movie version of this wistful love story. 
 
It's hard to decide what to praise first. In her breakout role, twenty-four-year-old Audrey Hepburn sparkles as the cosseted princess who takes flight for a day or so to experience freedom and "regular" life. 
 
Her joy at sitting at an outdoor cafe, buying gelato from a street vendor or riding on a Vespa is infectious. It's youth and beauty and freshness and wonder all springing from one stunning, lythe and vivacious girl.
 
But our heroine needs a charming young man for accompaniment on her brief adventure, so Hollywood served up the perfect offering in handsome "regular guy" Gregory Peck playing a reporter who sees a career-making story all but fall into his lap when he finds the momentarily wayward princess sleeping on a public bench.
 
Peck plays tour guide, friend and mentor to the innocent princess, ostensibly to get a story, but really to be a love interest to round out Hepburn's few days of freedom. 
 
Peck's motives are conflicted - he even brings along his photographer friend, wonderfully played by Eddie Albert, so that his story will have accompanying pictures - but there's no real menace in Roman Holiday as the movie is all about a fleeting moment of joy.
 
Rome itself, still a bit tattered and frayed from WWII, provides a picturesque background of old world elegance with a youthful vibe for Hepburn and Peck to run around, get into harmless scrapes with the locals and elude the secret service agents looking for their missing princess. And while that fun is going on, these two attractive and nice people, naturally, fall in love.
 
Wyler and team are too smart to allow this fairytale to become cloying, so you are always reminded that this "perfect" love story faces an all-but-insurmountable challenge as Hepburn is no ordinary girl and Peck is not royalty. 
 
The climax of Roman Holiday, which could easily have become overly sentimental, strikes a poignant balance between warmth and reality to complete one of Hollywood most-charming romantic comedies ever. Hollywood will never stop retelling this story, but it's unlikely it will ever get it more right than it did with this one magical picture in 1953.
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Juggernaut (1936 film).jpg

Juggernaut (1936) Youtube-5/10

A doctor (Boris Karloff) resorts to murder to fund his experiments.

This was an OK British drawing room melodrama. Karloff is good as always as the doctor with good intentions (he wants to find a cure for paralysis) but does it the wrong way. He is approached by the gold digging young wife of an ailing old rich man. She offers the doctor a huge sum of money if he will poison her husband and make it look like natural causes. I was not familiar with any else in the cast but Mona Goya as the scheming black widow stands out. This was around the time when British censors put a ban on horror films, ironically caused by the luridness of another Karloff film The Raven (1935). While this one is not great, Karloff fans may want to check it out for another of his sinister scientist roles.

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Blonde (2022) The nearly 3 hour Marilyn Monroe biopic that's new to Netflix.  Ana de Armas nailed her performance and I was actually doing a few doubletakes as there's a few angles she looks identical to Monroe.  There were some really cool shots in this film and then a few others that i couldn't understand why the director would choose to put them in at all.  In the end, for me the good parts outweigh the bad.  This has been given a rating of NC-17 but it isn't overly sexual.  I believe it's the abuse that's portrayed that warrants the rating.  This really paints a picture of how troubled Monroe was and suffered from abuse from nearly everyone throughout her short life.  JFK really comes across bad here.  (I've believed for years that the Kennedy brothers are directly responsible for her death.)  Recommend.

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2 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Juggernaut (1936 film).jpg

Juggernaut (1936) Youtube-5/10

A doctor (Boris Karloff) resorts to murder to fund his experiments.

This was an OK British drawing room melodrama. Karloff is good as always as the doctor with good intentions (he wants to find a cure for paralysis) but does it the wrong way. He is approached by the gold digging young wife of an ailing old rich man. She offers the doctor a huge sum of money if he will poison her husband and make it look like natural causes. I was not familiar with any else in the cast but Mona Goya as the scheming black widow stands out. This was around the time when British censors put a ban on horror films, ironically caused by the luridness of another Karloff film The Raven (1935). While this one is not great, Karloff fans may want to check it out for another of his sinister scientist roles.

100% agreed. Big fan of KARLOFF: THE UNCANNY, but this one is a yawner. 1938's THE BLACK ROOM is a better solo KARLOFF of the period.

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I watched LE MAIN DU DIABLE ( 1943) on TCM , (Francais for THE DEVILS HAND)

What a kooky little movie that gains speed exponentially as it goes on. It becomes more abstract and dreamlike until it borders on being something of an outright comedy/fantasy. Some stunning (unexpected) animation, some really engaging set pieces, and some terrific acting.

Also I’m sure the story of this being made in France in 1943 under Nazi occupation is an interesting one.

I recommend it, but stick with it, the first 20 to 30 minutes are somewhat pedestrian, but It gets incredibly interesting after that.

** Forgot to mention, the Wikipedia entry for this film mentions Bosley Crowther thought it was an unimpressive movie. He really was the LEONARD MALTIN of his day.

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I actually watched this overnight going into Saturday, so I can't really say that I just watched it, but another dip into a combination of  provocative cinema and films with bad reputations has led me to another film which was once dubbed the worst film of its year in the 1990s. The film is Color of Night (1994), and it is a frustrating case. I gather that I watched the theatrical cut of the film, 18 minutes shorter than the Director's cut, which supposedly makes more sense (and is more explicit than this already steamy and overheated version).Make no mistake, this film is not good. The plot scoops up all these elements of other films like Basic Instinct, Sea of Love, and Dressed to Kill, and tries to form it all together. The end result is a film that often veers into the unintentionally amusing, and has so many far-fetched notions and outrageous, yet predictable, twists that it is impossible to imagine anybody thinking that it is even halfway credible. It also has the tremendous irony of being a very violent and sexual film that was distributed by the Walt Disney company. And yet...the film has truly striking elements that raise it  several levels above what a truly and completely bad film would be. Perhaps this is because it was made by a director who was eccentric (Richard Rush, his only film done after his Oscar nomination for 1980's The Stunt Man), but it has more of an offbeat pulse than many other films of the lethargic year 1994.

First to try to sum up the story, which is hard without giving many things away, this is the sage of a New York psychiatrist (Bruce Willis) who has remained traumatized and unsure of his profession ever since one of his clients (Kathleen Wilhoite) leapt to her demise from his highrise office window. Needing relief, and suffering from colorblindness, he visits an old colleague (Scott Bacula) in L.A. and is asked to help sit in with  a Monday night group session. This unusual group consists of a man with rabid OCD, a rageoholic, a racy 40ish gold digger who is having a dalliance with a woman she wishes was a man instead, a teen with a stuttering complex and gender issues, and an avant-garde artist. Soon, the friend is dead, and one member of the group will follow suit , and Willis takes over control to try to piece together who the guilty party is, finding his own life in danger in the process. He also finds himself drawn into a torrid relationship with an uninhibited young woman (Jane March), who appears and disappears like the wind. Ultimately, of course, everything ties together in "surprising" ways.

Frankly, its all cuckoo, but the film has striking photography and staging, and for all of the catastrophes in the writing, the acting is quite intriguing. Bruce Willis has a few dramatic scenes that he is really good in,  Lesley Ann Warren is a lot of fun as the gold digger, Shirley Knight has an extremely brief but well performed role, and then there is the case of Jane March. March had been pegged as an intriguing personality after she did 1992's steamy The Lover, but this film effectively killed her career at age 21. As one might expect, there is more to her role than might be thought, and I'm not sure rhat anyone could navigate all the different directions the part requires.But March makes such a valiant effort, and there are scenes where she is far upstaging the film around her and she is truly affecting (she reminded me a bit of young Leigh Taylor-Young) It's a true shame that she was made the scapegoat for the film's failure, as she truly does have talent. The finale is shockingly violent, with truly disturbing imagry. There is also a truly beautiful and haunting title song, and the film's quirkiness gives it a jittery pulse that makes it a pretty lively affair. Extremely trashy, but lively still. Color of Night is in absolutely no way a film that is essential to watch, or for that matter I don't even recommend it be watched, but it does serve as an illustration as to how even a flimsy, sometimes laughable 90s misfire has more juice, passion, and moviemaking vigor than almost anything coming from Hollywood today.

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6 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

I actually watched this overnight going into Saturday, so I can't really say that I just watched it, but another dip into a combination of  provocative cinema and films with bad reputations has led me to another film which was once dubbed the worst film of its year in the 1990s. The film is Color of Night (1994), and it is a frustrating case. I gather that I watched the theatrical cut of the film, 18 minutes shorter than the Director's cut, which supposedly makes more sense (and is more explicit than this already steamy and overheated version).Make no mistake, this film is not good. The plot scoops up all these elements of other films like Basic Instinct, Sea of Love, and Dressed to Kill, and tries to form it all together. The end result is a film that often veers into the unintentionally amusing, and has so many far-fetched notions and outrageous, yet predictable, twists that it is impossible to imagine anybody thinking that it is even halfway credible. It also has the tremendous irony of being a very violent and sexual film that was distributed by the Walt Disney company. And yet...the film has truly striking elements that raise it  several levels above what a truly and completely bad film would be. Perhaps this is because it was made by a director who was eccentric (Richard Rush, his only film done after his Oscar nomination for 1980's The Stunt Man), but it has more of an offbeat pulse than many other films of the lethargic year 1994.

First to try to sum up the story, which is hard without giving many things away, this is the sage of a New York psychiatrist (Bruce Willis) who has remained traumatized and unsure of his profession ever since one of his clients (Kathleen Wilhoite) leapt to her demise from his highrise office window. Needing relief, and suffering from colorblindness, he visits an old colleague (Scott Bacula) in L.A. and is asked to help sit in with  a Monday night group session. This unusual group consists of a man with rabid OCD, a rageoholic, a racy 40ish gold digger who is having a dalliance with a woman she wishes was a man instead, a teen with a stuttering complex and gender issues, and an avant-garde artist. Soon, the friend is dead, and one member of the group will follow suit , and Willis takes over control to try to piece together who the guilty party is, finding his own life in danger in the process. He also finds himself drawn into a torrid relationship with an uninhibited young woman (Jane March), who appears and disappears like the wind. Ultimately, of course, everything ties together in "surprising" ways.

Frankly, its all cuckoo, but the film has striking photography and staging, and for all of the catastrophes in the writing, the acting is quite intriguing. Bruce Willis has a few dramatic scenes that he is really good in,  Lesley Ann Warren is a lot of fun as the gold digger, Shirley Knight has an extremely brief but well performed role, and then there is the case of Jane March. March had been pegged as an intriguing personality after she did 1992's steamy The Lover, but this film effectively killed her career at age 21. As one might expect, there is more to her role than might be thought, and I'm not sure rhat anyone could navigate all the different directions the part requires.But March makes such a valiant effort, and there are scenes where she is far upstaging the film around her and she is truly affecting (she reminded me a bit of young Leigh Taylor-Young) It's a true shame that she was made the scapegoat for the film's failure, as she truly does have talent. The finale is shockingly violent, with truly disturbing imagry. There is also a truly beautiful and haunting title song, and the film's quirkiness gives it a jittery pulse that makes it a pretty lively affair. Extremely trashy, but lively still. Color of Night is in absolutely no way a film that is essential to watch, or for that matter I don't even recommend it be watched, but it does serve as an illustration as to how even a flimsy, sometimes laughable 90s misfire has more juice, passion, and moviemaking vigor than almost anything coming from Hollywood today.

The movie is sex crazed mess but your right is a lot more interesting than anything now

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13 hours ago, Fading Fast said:

The climax of Roman Holiday, which could easily have become overly sentimental, strikes a poignant balance between warmth and reality to complete one of Hollywood most-charming romantic comedies ever. Hollywood will never stop retelling this story, but it's unlikely it will ever get it more right than it did with this one magical picture in 1953.

I have always commended the film for keeping it real.. "I would like to meet the ladies and gentlemen of the Press," after which she make that long walk shaking hands. Mercifully they didn't speak to each other. They're facial expressions were enough. I think I read that the movie needed to be careful as not offend the crown with dialogue unbecoming a Princess, after all Queen Elizabeth I hand been crowned just the year before.  I mean you cannot have her say, "Ill meet you at the Piazza in 20 minutes."

 

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