Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

 

(In the overly "sweetness and light" department: I mean things like trees, the sound of rain, the smell of a summer evening, peonies in bloom, the taste of wild raspberries, etc.etc.   I know, I know... I did warn you about the Pollyanna factor...)

 

So MissW. Do ya ALSO like Pina Coladas AND gettin' caught in that there rain ya said you liked the sound of???

 

'Cause if ya DO, then write to me and escape!!!

 

(...sorry, couldn't resist) ;)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you really think so? I'm not sure we can measure laughter - sometimes I tire of hearing about all the studies that try to do so. If you mean poor people appreciate the (limited??) moments of joy  in their lives more than rich people do, I'd say possibly, but even that's debatable.

At the risk of sounding horribly Pollyanna-ish, I think one of the great things about laughter, along with certain other things too "sweetness and light -ish" to go into, are democratic- gifts that anyone can experience and enjoy, without diminishing the supply and without cost.

 

(In the overly "sweetness and light" department: I mean things like trees, the sound of rain, the smell of a summer evening, peonies in bloom, the taste of wild raspberries, etc.etc.   I know, I know... I did warn you about the Pollyanna factor...)

 

!

 

==

Link to post
Share on other sites

She really didn't make very many, and the ones she made haven't aged well at all.

 

 

Farewell to Arms is good. I happened to see that not too long ago with the unhappy ending  (apparently for overseas?) I thought they had changed the ending (at least here)...

Link to post
Share on other sites

No, the unhappy ending was kept for the Helen Hayes (1932) & Jennifer Jones/Rock Hudson (1957) versions in the States--don't know about overseas.

 

 

Strange. I thought I'd read somwhere the 30's version had a happy ending. At any rate, was glad they kept to the original ending...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Helen Hayes was primarily a stage actress, although she did win two Oscars. You may already know that her husband Charles MacArthur wrote (with Ben Hecht) such classic American plays as The Front Page and Twentieth Century; and that her son (adopted) was James MacArthur, of "Hawaii Five-0" and many movies.

One of my favorite stories concerns Hayes and her husband Charles MacArthur. Supposedly, early in their marriage, he gave her a handful of peanuts and said, "I wish they were emeralds." Then much later, when they were both successful, he gave her a handful of emeralds and said, "I wish they were peanuts." Ridiculously romantic (and probably untrue) but I like it.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just watched The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1938), which was on TCM a couple of weeks ago. Very enjoyable, sweet film -- nice early Technicolor. I believe both Tommy Kelly, who played Tom, and Ann Gillis, who played Becky, are still with us. The kids and older actors are all great. The cave scene near the end is quite spooky. Ann Gillis has a mad scene that almost equals Bramwell Fletcher laughing himself to death in The Mummy a few years earlier.

 

the-adventures-of-tom-sawyer.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Passionate Thief (1960) directed by Mario Monicelli.  Its original Italian title is 'Risate di Gioia' which translates to 'Joyous Laughter.'

 

Fans of Anna Magnani must see this film.  She is very very funny in it.  I saw the subtitled film in the cinema and there were quite a few Italian ladies in the audience who were tittering at Anna's every gesture.  

The other revelation for me was the performance of Toto.  I had seen him in a bit part in Big Deal on Madonna Street but never in a lead role.  In this film you can see why he was such a big star in Italy.  His comic timing is superb.  He reminded me a little of Buster Keaton.

Ben Gazzara plays the Italian thief, Lello.  The Italian actor who dubbed Gazzara deserves kudos for his performance is terrific as well.  As an aside, I was first a little bewildered as to why you would bother to cast an American star like Gazzara in The Passionate Thief or Burt Lancaster in The Leopard and then dub their voice with that of another actor.  Then it occurred to me that in Italy every film is dubbed into their own language so they have probably never heard the 'real' Burt Lancaster or Ben Gazzara.  In fact they are probably used to the Italian faux Lancaster and Gazzara for the practise is often for the same Italian actor to dub all of the Lancaster films.  For instance, there was one particular actor in Italy who dubbed all of Jerry Lewis's films and his is the voice they are accustomed to.

Coming back to The Passionate Thief there is one particular scene that parodies La Dolce Vita that has a drunken American tourist played by Fred Clark (doing his own voice) wishing to wade into the Trevi fountain with Magnani.

Again, this film is a must for Magnani fans.

Link to post
Share on other sites

White Oleander (2002)

 

The lovely and artistic teen child of a murderous mother is sent into foster care. Chameleon-like, she tries to fit wherever she is, but her mother - even from prison - is having none of any happiness for her.

 

Every single actor in this one - from the youngest child to the most experienced adult - is pitch perfect in their performances. Alison Lohman is brilliant as the daughter - carrying the movie on her young shoulders expertly. Michelle Pfeiffer is perfectly self-centered, vicious, unlikeable in the extreme. Robin Wright gives a remarkably convincing turn as "born again" trailer trash.

 

This is weighty material overall, but impossible to turn away from. Truth be told, this is the 4th time I've watched this modern classic. Highly recommended.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw a few movies recently.  It's supposed to rain all weekend here in Oregon (yay!), I'm planning on lazing about and catching up on my DVR all weekend. Here's what I saw recently:

 

Pitch Perfect.  I didn't watch this movie when it originally came out in 2012.  I don't really know why.  It's got everything I love in a fun, fluff movie: singing, choreography, competitions and a smattering of romance.  Anna Kendrick was great as the edgy college student not really interested in joining the highly competitive world of a capella.  She has to be talked into it by the other members after one of them hears her singing in the shower.  Rebel Wilson was hilarious as "Fat Amy." Loved this movie.  I'm making my husband go with me to see Pitch Perfect 2.  Hopefully it won't be out of the second-run theater before we get there. 

 

Ant-Man.  My husband and I saw this movie earlier this week.  The latest outing from Marvel, this movie was hilarious.  Paul Rudd was perfect as Ant-Man.  Michael Douglas was really good as Hank Pym, a chemist who develops a suit that shrinks the wearer down to the size of an ant, but also gives them superhuman strength.  The film also featured an interesting CGI technology that allowed Michael Douglas to appear as 1987 Michael Douglas (think "Wall Street") in the beginning of the film and then appear as present-day Michael Douglas later.  Great movie.

 

Frances.  I had recorded this film during the movie star biopics that aired last month.  I didn't know much about Frances Farmer, only that she allegedly received a lobotomy (which I know is not true) and that she was in and out of asylums for years. I also knew that Farmer maintained that she didn't belong in the asylum and also was upset about how she was treated in these facilities.  I also knew that she was from Seattle and that Kurt Cobain wrote a song about her.  Anyway, I thought Jessica Lange was fantastic as Farmer.  I found myself sympathizing with her situation in being institutionalized against her will.  Her mother portrayed by Kim Stanley, was excellent as well.  I felt bad for Farmer when she wanted to abandon Hollywood, because she was finally feeling good and happy and her mother basically wanted to send her back to the institution because she didn't want her to "abandon her fame and fans." This movie was definitely sensationalized and I'm sure the story was embellished quite a bit, but it was a compelling film to watch.  I am interested in seeing the real Frances Farmer the next time TCM airs one of her films.

 

Double Indemnity.  Okay.  I've seen this film a bunch of times.  I watched it on Monday at the theater.  I love this movie.  It never gets old.  Fred MacMurray, Barbara Stanwyck and Edward G Robinson are all so good in their roles, I cannot imagine anyone else portraying these characters.  I love MacMurray's narration.  The look that Stanwyck has on her face while MacMurray is strangling her husband (off camera) is chilling.  Robinson is so good as MacMurray's boss.  I especially love his speech about the types of suicide and the probability of someone succeeding by falling off a train platform.  I always thought the Lola character was a little overdramatic (she reminds me of the "Bulgarian" girl in Casablanca) but I suppose if you had a stepmother who was responsible for the deaths of your parents and now she's screwing around with your boyfriend, you'd probably be a bit melodramatic too.  Another of my favorite things about this film is the camaraderie between MacMurray and Robinson's characters--especially the ending where Robinson helps MacMurray light his cigarette as he waits for the cops to show up. 

 

The Wasp Woman.  This movie was ridiculous.  The production values were so bad, but that's what made the movie better.  'Wasp Woman' was hilarious--especially Susan Cabot's costume.  These types of films always have low production values, extremely limited budgets, cheap sets, no-name actors (for the most part), over the top screaming and acting and are usually always very short.  I love these movies, they crack me up.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

An second/third recommendation for "White Oleander" (2002).  Only addition is, critics didn't get it (what's new?), but audiences definitely thought much higher of the film.  WO is well worth seeing. :)

White Oleander sounds really good.  Thanks DarkBlue and FilmLover293, I'll have to check this film out.  I've never seen it.  I just added it to my Netflix queue.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

EASY LIVING (1949)

 

I did not know that there was a second EASY LIVING besides the one with Jean Arthur made in 1937, but apparently there is.

 

Victor Mature is a pro football player with a heart problem- I can't recall the fictitious name of the team he plays for, but the players are billed as the LA Rams in the credits and wear helmets with rams on them, although the fictitious name has nothing to do with rams. Lizabeth Scott- who keeps popping up all over the board and the schedule- is his untalented interior decorator headcase of a wife (the set designer has a ball with her apartment, I think he had almost as much fun as whoever got to design what Doris did to Rock's apartment at the end of PILLOW TALK. ) and Lucile Ball- with unflattering hair and make-up, but the only decent part in the whole thing, is the team secretary who has a motherly thing for Mature and puts up with a lot of crap from him. She is terrific and her scenes are the only ones that still resonate today.

 

Sonny Tufts is also in it.

 

Victor finds out he has a heart problem. He shouldn't play...Lizabeth wants better things in life, they fight (stiffly), Lucy listens all the while....

 

ThenI go out for twenty minutes to walk the dog. When I return all hell is breaking loose.

 

The very presence of Lizabeth Scott in the movie has seeped into the story and we're in Dark City...a boozy Lizabeth, the edges of her fiberglass mane fraying, pores over a newspaper headline:

 

TOP MODEL LEAPS TO DEATH FROM PENTHOUSE!

 

 

She's dumped Vic and taken up with some rich old guy (maybe the team owner?). The old rich guy dumps her. She goes and begs for Vic- who has agreed to play ONE LAST BIG GAME AND GIVE IT HIS KNUTE ROCKNIAN ALL-AMERICAN ALL EVEN IF IT MEANS DYING IN THE PROCESS- to take her back.

 

He takes the field, decides not to play, and on the way to the locker room meets up with Lizabeth where he grabs her,

HITS HER IN THE FACE SO HARD THAT HER MOUTH IS BLEEDING!!!!!!!

Kisses her.

HITS HER AGAIN WIPES SOME OF THE BLOOD AWAY AND THEN TELLS HER HE'S TAKING AN ASSISTANT COACHING GIG AT A COLLEGE AND SHE BETTER LEARN TO LIKE IT OR ELSE!!!!!!

 

(Just try that kind of crap with Lucy, Pal. You ever had someone put a cigarette out on your eyeball?)

 

And then Paul Stewart, who plays a slimy sports photojournalist and manages to darken all the scenes that are missing Lizabeth, takes a picture of the happy (?!) couple (which earlier in the film is something that we are told brings bad luck to the athletes he gets photos of.)

 

 

the end.

 

WEIRD [...] MOVIE.

Edited by TCMModerator1
Edited for language
Link to post
Share on other sites

White Oleander (2002)

 

The lovely and artistic teen child of a murderous mother is sent into foster care. Chameleon-like, she tries to fit wherever she is, but her mother - even from prison - is having none of any happiness for her.

 

Every single actor in this one - from the youngest child to the most experienced adult - is pitch perfect in their performances. Alison Lohman is brilliant as the daughter - carrying the movie on her young shoulders expertly. Michelle Pfeiffer is perfectly self-centered, vicious, unlikeable in the extreme. Robin Wright gives a remarkably convincing turn as "born again" trailer trash.

 

This is weighty material overall, but impossible to turn away from. Truth be told, this is the 4th time I've watched this modern classic. Highly recommended.

White Oleander was my older daughters favorite book. She wrote to Janet Finch telling her how much she loved the book and admired her work. Janet Finch sent my daughter an autographed copy of the novel with a lovely inscription. My daughter still has it and it's a cherished possession.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I spent my Saturday night hunkered down to watch Ben-Hur (1959).  Though I've seen this film before, I've never watched it from beginning to end.  What to say beyond the usual cliche that it's a true epic?  Despite the movie's length, Judah Ben-Hur goes through so many "transformations", getting put into so many different situations, that it pulled me in and engrossed me. Also, interesting moral lesson on friendship, when looking at Judah Ben-Hur and the Tribune Messala: you can proclaim fraternal allegiance to the end, but as soon as one doesn't get what he wants from the other, friendship goes out the window.  And in their case, the lesson gets amplified a million times...

 

Oh...  also...  In the movie there was a huge, hulking bald man who was an assistant to Simonides.  For a second I thought to myself, "Is that Tor Johnson????"  But no, just a wannabe...

Link to post
Share on other sites

I spent my Saturday night hunkered down to watch Ben-Hur (1959).  Though I've seen this film before, I've never watched it from beginning to end.  What to say beyond the usual cliche that it's a true epic?  Despite the movie's length, Judah Ben-Hur goes through so many "transformations", getting put into so many different situations, that it pulled me in and engrossed me. Also, interesting moral lesson on friendship, when looking at Judah Ben-Hur and the Tribune Messala: you can proclaim fraternal allegiance to the end, but as soon as one doesn't get what he wants from the other, friendship goes out the window.  And in their case, the lesson gets amplified a million times...

 

SERIOUSLY: WATCH THE SILENT 1925 VERSION!

It is so much better. I've never appreciated the story at all until I saw the silent version.

Hopefully TCM'll show it again soon, but if not you can maybe netflix it or possibly watch it online, if you're in to that sort of thing.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Frances.  I had recorded this film during the movie star biopics that aired last month.  I didn't know much about Frances Farmer, only that she allegedly received a lobotomy (which I know is not true) and that she was in and out of asylums for years. I also knew that Farmer maintained that she didn't belong in the asylum and also was upset about how she was treated in these facilities.  I also knew that she was from Seattle and that Kurt Cobain wrote a song about her.  Anyway, I thought Jessica Lange was fantastic as Farmer.  I found myself sympathizing with her situation in being institutionalized against her will.  Her mother portrayed by Kim Stanley, was excellent as well. 

 

 

I've never seen FRANCES, but I love Kim Stanley. 

 

I also love Nirvana's song "Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge On Seattle."

 

I miss the comfort in being sad.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pTrhzk4Ipog

Link to post
Share on other sites

SERIOUSLY: WATCH THE SILENT 1925 VERSION!

It is so much better. I've never appreciated the story at all until I saw the silent version.

Hopefully TCM'll show it again soon, but if not you can maybe netflix it or possibly watch it online, if you're in to that sort of thing.

 

Definitely, that's also on my list!  In fact, I'm going to Classicflix.com right now...

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Frances.  I had recorded this film during the movie star biopics that aired last month.  I didn't know much about Frances Farmer, only that she allegedly received a lobotomy (which I know is not true) and that she was in and out of asylums for years. I also knew that Farmer maintained that she didn't belong in the asylum and also was upset about how she was treated in these facilities.  I also knew that she was from Seattle and that Kurt Cobain wrote a song about her.

 

Speedracer, you might know this, but Cobain named his daughter Frances, too.  :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

SERIOUSLY: WATCH THE SILENT 1925 VERSION!

It is so much better. I've never appreciated the story at all until I saw the silent version.

Hopefully TCM'll show it again soon, but if not you can maybe netflix it or possibly watch it online, if you're in to that sort of thing.

 

Yes, yes yes!

 

The silent version of BEN-HUR with Ramon Novarro is so much better than the later version.

 

novarro_wm.jpg

 

(This photo is not from BEN-HUR.)

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished watching Clash By Night.  I think I tried watching this movie once before and just couldn't get "into it." I'm sorry to report that the same happened again.  Even Barbara Stanwyck and a young Marilyn Monroe couldn't save this movie.  It was boring.  The one character's Chinese impression was beyond horrible and ugh.  I don't even want to talk about this movie anymore.  I was tempted to bail on it and go back to marathon watching I Love Lucy and The Mary Tyler Moore Show.  But I persevered and got through and that's about it.

 

I've moved on now to Easy Living, a Lucille Ball movie that I recorded.  It's got the icky Victor Mature (he's good in some of the movies I've seen him in, he's horribly unattractive to me though) so hopefully he won't ruin it for me.  It also co-stars Lizabeth Scott, so we'll see how this goes.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I hadn't seen the film since sometime in the '60s, when my mother and I laughed all through it; but I really loved seeing it, again, and really enjoyed it.  I have come to the conclusion, that Barbara Stanwyck has appeared in more watchable films than any other actress, by far!

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

"That Hamilton Woman" (1941) had a quote that made me gag.....Macaroni pudding.  I had to look it up to see if it was for real.  Yuck, it is.

 

picQhb7sw.jpg

 

 

 

...but it doesn't make me gag more than that snob Lady (yeah right) Frances.

 

cooper-and-olivier-in-their-confrontatio

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...