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Rome Express (1932).

 

What a pleasure it is when you discover a little film you never heard of which turns out to be a genuine treat. Rome Express clearly qualifies as such, a Gaumont British production which can be seen as a prototype for future thrillers than would be set entirely on trains. In particular it makes one think of Hitchcock's The Lady Vanishes which is not too surprising since both films have the same screenwriter, Sidney Gilliat (who would later be director of Green for Danger and the excellent State Secret).

 

Aside from the train setting, however, in which various passengers intermingle with one another, with crime and murder to be a part of the course of this trip, this film has, like the later Hitchcock film, a lightness in tone that adds to its pleasure. One seriously has to wonder, in fact, if the future Sir Alfred didn't see this film before he directed his own variation on it.

 

As directed by Walter Forde, Rome Express moves with the same speed as the express train on which the story is set, the main plot involving a stolen Van Dyke painting hidden in a briefcase and two partners of the thief, one of them very deadly, indeed, in search of the now frightened man who decided to abscond with the painting on his own.

 

The largely British cast is fine, including Joan Barry (a Hitchcock leading lady around this time in Rich and Strange) and, particularly effective, Donald Calthrop, whom Hitchcock buffs may recall as the blackmailer in Blackmail, Alfred's first talkie. In this film he's the man with the hidden Van Dyke.

 

Cedric Hardwicke also scores very well here as a smug, penny pinching millionaire forever castigating his cowering manservant for some minor misdeed. Esther Ralston, a very attractive silent film star whose talkie career would never reach the same heights as her silent one, is quite winning in the role of a movie star on board the train who becomes accidentally mixed up with the art thieves.

 

Saving the best for last is Conrad Veidt, in great form here, as the more sinister of the two art thieves searching for the passenger (Calthrop) who has the painting. Veidt brings an intelligence and polished flair to his performance. Ruthless as he is when he has a man cornered, he is also an elegant scoundrel who presents a smiling, affable facade to those around him.

 

Veidt is highly effective in his role, both attractive and deadly as a cobra. If anyone in this film exudes star presence it is definitely the German actor probably best remembered today for his performance as Major Strasser in Casablanca.

 

If you're into thrillers, particularly those set aboard trains, try seeking this film out. You should be more than satisfied.

 

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3 out of 4 stars.

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Rome Express (1932).

 

What a pleasure it is when you discover a little film you never heard of which turns out to be a genuine treat. Rome Express clearly qualifies as such, a Gaumont British production which can be seen as a prototype for future thrillers than would be set entirely on trains. In particular it makes one think of Hitchcock's The Lady Vanishes which is not too surprising since both films have the same screenwriter, Sidney Gilliat (who would later be director of Green for Danger and the excellent State Secret).

 

Aside from the train setting, however, in which various passengers intermingle with one another, with crime and murder to be a part of the course of this trip, this film has, like the later Hitchcock film, a lightness in tone that adds to its pleasure. One seriously has to wonder, in fact, if the future Sir Alfred didn't see this film before he directed his own variation on it.

 

As directed by Walter Forde, Rome Express moves with the same speed as the express train on which the story is set, the main plot involving a stolen Van Dyke painting hidden in a briefcase and two partners of the thief, one of them very deadly, indeed, in search of the now frightened man who decided to abscond with the painting on his own.

 

The largely British cast is fine, including Joan Barry (a Hitchcock leading lady around this time in Rich and Strange) and, particularly effective, Donald Calthrop, whom Hitchcock buffs may recall as the blackmailer in Blackmail, Alfred's first talkie. In this film he's the man with the hidden Van Dyke.

 

Cedric Hardwicke also scores very well here as a smug, penny pinching millionaire forever castigating his cowering manservant for some minor misdeed. Esther Ralston, a very attractive silent film star whose talkie career would never reach the same heights as her silent one, is quite winning in the role of a movie star on board the train who becomes accidentally mixed up with the art thieves.

 

Saving the best for last is Conrad Veidt, in great form here, as the more sinister of the two art thieves searching for the passenger (Calthrop) who has the painting. Veidt brings an intelligence and polished flair to his performance. Ruthless as he is when he has a man cornered, he is also an elegant scoundrel who presents a smiling, affable facade to those around him.

 

Veidt is highly effective in his role, both attractive and deadly as a cobra. If anyone in this film exudes star presence it is definitely the German actor probably best remembered today for his performance as Major Strasser in Casablanca.

 

If you're into thrillers, particularly those set aboard trains, try seeking this film out. You should be more than satisfied.

 

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bfi-00n-980.jpg?itok=kNC4USpF

 

3 out of 4 stars.

 

Nice.

 

The best for last, indeed, I jumped a little at the mention of Conrad at which time this movie became a must. The name Esther Ralston rang a bell and then ah yes, I remember her in Peter Pan (1924). I have a copy of the latter and gets a reading from time to time. Sir Cedric is there too. It seems to get better and better just reading about it.

 

This seems not a familiar title to me, has it been shown on TCM?

 

=

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Nice.

 

The best for last, indeed, I jumped a little at the mention of Conrad at which time this movie became a must. The name Esther Ralston rang a bell and then ah yes, I remember her in Peter Pan (1924). I have a copy of the latter and gets a reading from time to time. Sir Cedric is there too. It seems to get better and better just reading about it.

 

This seems not a familiar title to me, has it been shown on TCM?

 

=

 

To the best of my knowledge (I've had TCM since 2005) the channel has not shown Rome Express during that time period.

 

However, I see a DVD of it is available on amazon at a dirt cheap price of $7.00. You won't be sorry you made this purchase, especially at such a great price.

 

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To the best of my knowledge (I've had TCM since 2005) the channel has not shown Rome Express during that time period.

 

However, I see a DVD of it is available on amazon at a dirt cheap price of $7.00. You won't be sorry you made this purchase, especially at such a great price.

 

I just picked it up.  Thanks, Tom!  :)

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I just picked it up.  Thanks, Tom!   :)

 

You're welcome, Babs, I mean, Eugenia.

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"Colossus and the Headhunters" (1963)--Watched on MST3K, because that was the only version available.  Serious rating; 1/10 stars, for the volcano eruption that starts the movie.  Now that's out of the way:

 

This is one of the unintentionally funniest movies I've ever seen: Not quite as funny as 1935's "She" or 1943's "The Gang's All Here", but in terms of idiocy, is hysterically funny Without commentators help. With their comments added, I laughed myself sick.  Some of the funniest bits:  

 

During an headhunter attack, zippers are in plain sight on their costumes.

 

The dance a character performs to appease angry gods is a hysterical mix of interpretive dance,

ballet, calisthenics from ?, and just bad balance plus being out of rhythm with the music.

 

The lead character is called Colossus at the start of the film, then Machistay, Machistuh, Macest, and One time, cheeset.

 

During a chase scene, the main character tells the heroine as he grabs her "Stay here.  Leave the Breast to me!" :wacko:

 

The men all wear dangerously short outfits;  When Crow yelled "Great ***** of Fire", one guess as to what was on display.

 

Film is 9/10 on the "So Bad It's Good" scale. :D

 

Edit--the title wasn't on TCM.  I had to check imdb for release date and cast specifics--the film has a 1.7 rating.

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Blue Velvet (1986) Noir goes Bizarre

 

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Blue Velvet's premise is based on The Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew. These were fictional characters who appeared in various mystery books for children and teens. The characters were conceived in 1926 for the Hardy's and 1930 for Nancy Drew, by Edward Stratemeyer for the Stratemeyer Syndicate. The syndicate paid ghostwriters to write the stories. The Hardy Boys' stories are often linked to the various cases their detective father is assigned to.. He sometimes asks them for help, while at other times they stumble upon the bad guys and clues that are connected to his cases. Nancy on the other hand was the daughter of an attorney and similarly her cases consist of those which she stumbles upon and some of which begin as cases of her father's.

 

It's through the relative innocence of the films amateur detectives that we enter bizarro world. But just don't think of Blue Velvet as The Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew go to Noirsville. They go to

N O I R S V I L L E !!!!

 

Blue Velvet is artistically innovative, wonderfully surreal, and darkly creepy. The cinematography and set design emphasise a dystopian world lurking just below a thin veneer of normalcy. Along with film noir stylistics, the film employs highly discordant color motifs. 

 

The score by Angelo Badalamenti and the various integrated classic soundtracks compliment the film. Blue Velvet is a pedal to the metal gloriously over the top ride. 10/10

 


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Blue Velvet (1986) Noir goes Bizarre

 

One of my all-time favorites. Great write-up Joe.

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O HENRY'S FULL HOUSE

 

Just finished watching this movie anthology.

 

I skipped the Red Chief story as it irritated me and I wanted a bit of a break.  It's kind of funny, because this segment was originally cut from the film - but I never saw the movie without the segment.

 

My favourite Christmas short story of all time is The Gift of the Magi.

 

I love all of these except the boy in Red Chief annoys me.

 

 

 

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O'HENRY'S FULL HOUSE is sort of a showcase for people who were under contract to 20th Century Fox at the time  (1952) . My favorite segment is the first one with Charles Laughton (who almost always entertains me a lot ),  David Wayne is also there, and Marilyn Monroe has a rather brief part (still she is noticeable) . Ironically today Marilyn is the one most promoted  on the dvd , while the other Fox  gals (Anne Baxter, Jean Peters, and Jeanne Crain) are the real stars featured.  I   single out "The Last Leaf" for Jean Peters'  excellent work, damn I wish she hadn't  "retired" from acting  so soon after.  "Ransom of Red Chief"  works well, Fred Allen  and Oscar  Levant offer up a peculiar kind of comedy here.  "The Gift of the Magi"  is nicely done, that is such an often imitated little storyline but it always works.  Ironically, for me anyway, the story I like the least here is "The Clarion Call".  I am  always such a big Richard Widmark fan and I know he is purposely spoofing his Tommy Udo character, but I think it is a little too over the top.  It's like a one joke  that's played too long and gets tiring.   Oh well, they can't all be winners.

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O'HENRY'S FULL HOUSE is sort of a showcase for people who were under contract to 20th Century Fox at the time  (1952) . My favorite segment is the first one with Charles Laughton (who almost always entertains me a lot ),  David Wayne is also there, and Marilyn Monroe has a rather brief part (still she is noticeable) . Ironically today Marilyn is the one most promoted  on the dvd , while the other Fox  gals (Anne Baxter, Jean Peters, and Jeanne Crain) are the real stars featured.  I   single out "The Last Leaf" for Jean Peters'  excellent work, damn I wish she hadn't  "retired" from acting  so soon after.  "Ransom of Red Chief"  works well, Fred Allen  and Oscar  Levant offer up a peculiar kind of comedy here.  "The Gift of the Magi"  is nicely done, that is such an often imitated little storyline but it always works.  Ironically, for me anyway, the story I like the least here is "The Clarion Call".  I am  always such a big Richard Widmark fan and I know he is purposely spoofing his Tommy Udo character, but I think it is a little too over the top.  It's like a one joke  that's played too long and gets tiring.   Oh well, they can't all be winners.

The part of The Clarion Call I liked the best is when they are singing Camptown Races.

 

I don't see it quite as over the top as Widmark debut fim - but perhaps that is just me because he was always nervously laughing.  Certainly he played gangster well, maybe it just we, but I think Widmar k was chosen because he fit that type of sterotyped role anyway.

 

As for  you Mr. Roberts being a Widmark fan and not liking it as much, well:

 

Ask me sometime about my opinion of Gregory Peck in the movie Only the Valiant  - and his own opinion, for that matter,

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Several weeks ago I recorded "M" (1951) , which is a rather good remake of the classic 1931 German film that starred Peter Lorre as the mentally disturbed little man who preys on young children.  David Wayne gets to play the thankless role in the new film and does a very effective job here, Wayne was a very good actor (he was Pulver in the MISTER ROBERTS stage play with Henry Fonda).  Wayne's hysterical pleading to the mob  at the end was very intense. A lot of well known  character actors appear in this film (did anyone see William Schallert make a brief appearance?). Watching this film (my first time) made me think of the classic HE WALKED BY NIGHT with Richard Basehart  as the deranged killer on the loose and being hunted down.

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Several weeks ago I recorded "M" (1951) , which is a rather good remake of the classic 1931 German film that starred Peter Lorre as the mentally disturbed little man who preys on young children.  David Wayne gets to play the thankless role in the new film and does a very effective job here, Wayne was a very good actor (he was Pulver in the MISTER ROBERTS stage play with Henry Fonda).  Wayne's hysterical pleading to the mob  at the end was very intense. A lot of well known  character actors appear in this film (did anyone see William Schallert make a brief appearance?). Watching this film (my first time) made me think of the classic HE WALKED BY NIGHT with Richard Basehart  as the deranged killer on the loose and being hunted down.

I prefer He Walked By the Night .

 

But yes, the remake of M is quit the departure  for Wayne whom I watch most of often The Tender Trap.

 

I loved his segment with Charles Laughton in the first O Henry segment.

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Several weeks ago I recorded "M" (1951) , which is a rather good remake of the classic 1931 German film that starred Peter Lorre as the mentally disturbed little man who preys on young children.  David Wayne gets to play the thankless role in the new film and does a very effective job here, Wayne was a very good actor (he was Pulver in the MISTER ROBERTS stage play with Henry Fonda).  Wayne's hysterical pleading to the mob  at the end was very intense. A lot of well known  character actors appear in this film (did anyone see William Schallert make a brief appearance?). Watching this film (my first time) made me think of the classic HE WALKED BY NIGHT with Richard Basehart  as the deranged killer on the loose and being hunted down.

 

Thanks for the write-up, Mr. Roberts. I've never seen the re-make of "M", and come to think of it, it's been a while since I saw the original.

have seen He Walked By Night more recently and in fact own the DVD. There are similarities between this film and M, mainly in, as you say, the pursuit and hunting down scenes.

However, I'd much rather be alone in a dark alley with the criminal from He Walked By Night than with the killer from M.  I always felt the former was just a very clever burglar who wouldn't kill unless he felt he had to, whereas, with the latter, it's all about killing. (which is not to say that we don't feel vaguely sorry for him, as Peter Lorre and  Fritz Lang intended.)

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Several weeks ago I recorded "M" (1951) , which is a rather good remake of the classic 1931 German film that starred Peter Lorre as the mentally disturbed little man who preys on young children.  David Wayne gets to play the thankless role in the new film and does a very effective job here, Wayne was a very good actor (he was Pulver in the MISTER ROBERTS stage play with Henry Fonda).  Wayne's hysterical pleading to the mob  at the end was very intense. A lot of well known  character actors appear in this film (did anyone see William Schallert make a brief appearance?). Watching this film (my first time) made me think of the classic HE WALKED BY NIGHT with Richard Basehart  as the deranged killer on the loose and being hunted down.

Thanks for the info about the remake of "M." I recorded this the last time it aired and saw the original version last summer during the noir class. I loved the original. While I would watch it again, I don't think it's a film I need to own. Not exactly a feel good film, but it was fascinating. I'll need to make a point to watch the remake. Maybe I'll watch it Friday or Saturday night (seems like a nighttime movie).

 

I've only seen David Wayne in comedies (Adam's Rib, We're Not Married, The Tender Trap & How to Marry a Millionaire) and he also played Blanche's father, "Big Daddy," on an episode (or two) of "The Golden Girls." It'd be interesting to see him portraying a child serial killer. No matter how you look at it, that's a dark story.

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The score by Angelo Badalamenti and the various integrated classic soundtracks compliment the film.

 

Thanks for including that, cigarjoe. Badalamenti is one of my favorite film composers, as his music could really elevate a scene & story overall.

I only saw this movie ONCE in the theater but remember feeling creepy afterwards. Maybe enough time has passed it should be revisited.

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O'HENRY'S FULL HOUSE is sort of a showcase for people who were under contract to 20th Century Fox at the time  (1952) . My favorite segment is the first one with Charles Laughton (who almost always entertains me a lot ),  David Wayne is also there, and Marilyn Monroe has a rather brief part (still she is noticeable) . Ironically today Marilyn is the one most promoted  on the dvd , while the other Fox  gals (Anne Baxter, Jean Peters, and Jeanne Crain) are the real stars featured.  I   single out "The Last Leaf" for Jean Peters'  excellent work, damn I wish she hadn't  "retired" from acting  so soon after.  "Ransom of Red Chief"  works well, Fred Allen  and Oscar  Levant offer up a peculiar kind of comedy here.  "The Gift of the Magi"  is nicely done, that is such an often imitated little storyline but it always works.  Ironically, for me anyway, the story I like the least here is "The Clarion Call".  I am  always such a big Richard Widmark fan and I know he is purposely spoofing his Tommy Udo character, but I think it is a little too over the top.  It's like a one joke  that's played too long and gets tiring.   Oh well, they can't all be winners.

 

Big "YES!" across the board to everything you write.

 

I was less impressed by the vignette featuring Laughton than I was by his- as always- masterful work. Over the last couple of years, I've come across a lot of performances of Laughton's that I had not seen before- RUGGLES OF RED GAP, THE SUSPECT, THE BIG CLOCK, HOBSON'S CHOICE, REMBRANDT and others.) It's getting to the point where I may have to amend my previous position that Cary Grant was the greatest actor of all time to say that Laughton was the greatest actor of all time.

 

Marilyn was nothing less than perfection in her all-too-brief cameo, seeing her and Laughton interact was a thrilll.

 

Jean Peters blew me away; I've always heard her discussed as Howard Hughes' girlfriend and not as an actress, seeing her work in this film last night; I am annoyed by this because she was a real talent. Anne Baxter was never more beautiful or genuine than she is in this film. This was my favorite vignette.

 

I was a little iffy on THE GIFT OF THE MAGI, Farley Granger was cute, but not the best actor; Jeanne Crain has never been one of my favorites (is it just me or does she always look kinda annoyed to be onscreen?) I did love how that haircut bordered on Audrey Hepburn levels of chicness, it really worked well with Crain's "resting ***** face", I wish Jeanne had worn that haircut from then on, it would've at least given her a reason to look so cheesed off all the time.

 

Ditto to your opinions on Widmark and his vignette.

 

THE RANSOM OF RED CHIEF was my favorite. Maybe it's because I'm southern, but I've known little boys like this...I may possibly have even been one myself. Levant's deadpan worked for me.

 

EDIT: Just realized I had two "favorites." Oh well, sue me.

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Big "YES!" across the board to everything you write.

 

I was less impressed by the vignette featuring Laughton than I was by his- as always- masterful work. Over the last couple of years, I've come across a lot of performances of Laughton's that I had not seen before- RUGGLES OF RED GAP, THE SUSPECT, THE BIG CLOCK, HOBSON'S CHOICE, REMBRANDT and others.) It's getting to the point where I may have to amend my previous position that Cary Grant was the greatest actor of all time to say that Laughton was the greatest actor of all time.

 

Marilyn was nothing less than perfection in her all-too-brief cameo, seeing her and Laughton interact was a thrilll.

 

Jean Peters blew me away; I've always heard her discussed as Howard Hughes' girlfriend and not as an actress, seeing her work in this film last night; I am annoyed by this because she was a real talent. Anne Baxter was never more beautiful or genuine than she is in this film. This was my favorite vignette.

 

I was a little iffy on THE GIFT OF THE MAGI, Farley Granger was cute, but not the best actor; Jeanne Crain has never been one of my favorites (is it just me or does she always look kinda annoyed to be onscreen?) I did love how that haircut bordered on Audrey Hepburn levels of chicness, it really worked well with Crain's "resting ***** face", I wish Jeanne had worn that haircut from then on, it would've at least given her a reason to look so cheesed off all the time.

 

Ditto to your opinions on Widmark and his vignette.

 

THE RANSOM OF RED CHIEF was my favorite. Maybe it's because I'm southern, but I've known little boys like this...I may possibly have even been one myself. Levant's deadpan worked for me.

 

EDIT: Just realized I had two "favorites." Oh well, sue me.

 RE; Gift of the Magi;

 

This has also been done on Sesame Street.  Back in the days when Mr. Hooper was alive - remember Mr. Hooper's store?

 

Bert and Ernie were the ones who gave the Gift of the Magi.

 

I love Oscar Levant.

 

I just skipped the Red Chief story because I needed a break and that was the story I chose to skip.

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THE RANSOM OF RED CHIEF is probably my favorite O Henry story.  I have several members in my family, some now fully grown, and some still kids, who I can relate that tale to.

 

There's one O Henry story I ran across in a collection of his stories in which rich white kids were having a garden party in "upper crust" Connecticut, and one "rich kid" teen boy was combing his hair while looking in a mirror, and a girl poked her had in the room and asked what he was trying to do, and he replied, "I'm trying to LOOK FLY."  !!!

 

It FLOORED me wen I read that.  Seems everything old IS new again!

 

Just wish I could remember the title of that story.

 

Sepiatone

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Going My Way

 

I recorded this film for my 92-year-old mother, having never seen it myself. My timer was slightly off for the recording, so the opening credits were cut a bit. After Mom saw the film, she asked me to check if Rise Stevens was in it, because she was sure she had recognized her. Who is Rise Stevens, I thought. So I checked, and saw her listed in the credits. Then my mother explained that she had seen Rise Stevens many years ago in “Carmen” at the Metropolitan in NYC, and told me how famous she was.

 

Today I watched the film on TCM on Demand. Rise Stevens was quite the revelation. Besides the beautiful voice, Miss Stevens had a natural acting talent, and, I must add, she was very beautiful. Yes, the film was great too, and highly recommended.

 

I already knew that places such as tcm.com and imdb.com and afi.com were good places to find information on entertainers who are no longer with us.  But I learned something today. I learned that the generation who came before us have some solid information to share with us as well.

 

Thanks, Mom!

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Dangerous Crossing (1953) is a modest but entertaining noir/suspense film starring Jeanne Crain and Michael Rennie.  The Fox Film Noir DVD also has an interesting 9-minute Behind The Scenes featurette.  If you are going through a bit of Robert Osborne withdrawal as I am, you will enjoy seeing a somewhat younger Robert who is featured in the BTS explaining how the studio system could inexpensively make the film by re-using sets and costumes from other productions (some nice examples are shown).  Eddie Muller also briefly appears discussing some of the noir aspects of the story.  The film runs a brisk 75 minutes and together with the BTS is very enjoyable.

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Going My Way

 

I recorded this film for my 92-year-old mother, having never seen it myself. My timer was slightly off for the recording, so the opening credits were cut a bit. After Mom saw the film, she asked me to check if Rise Stevens was in it, because she was sure she had recognized her. Who is Rise Stevens, I thought. So I checked, and saw her listed in the credits. Then my mother explained that she had seen Rise Stevens many years ago in “Carmen” at the Metropolitan in NYC, and told me how famous she was.

 

Today I watched the film on TCM on Demand. Rise Stevens was quite the revelation. Besides the beautiful voice, Miss Stevens had a natural acting talent, and, I must add, she was very beautiful. Yes, the film was great too, and highly recommended.

 

I already knew that places such as tcm.com and imdb.com and afi.com were good places to find information on entertainers who are no longer with us.  But I learned something today. I learned that the generation who came before us have some solid information to share with us as well.

 

Thanks, Mom!

I love posts like this one.

 

To record something for your mother, watch it because she watched it and find out information you did not know by talking to her is fabulous.

 

My grandparents were WWII era and the last one died at 94. My grandmother and I were very close and I learned so much from her.

 

I love Going My Way.

 

It's one of my top ten favourite movies of that year. 

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Money Monster (2016): Julia Roberts, George Clooney, Jack O'Connell (Unbroken). This was a pretty good movie. I got to see it for free, so that was even better. I love Julia Roberts and I have made a goal to watch every single movie she has been in (and will be in the future). As for Clooney, I never really got into his films a whole lot. Honestly, I think this one is better than the remake of Ghostbusters is going to be.

 

3/5 stars.

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Money Monster (2016): Julia Roberts, George Clooney, Jack O'Connell (Unbroken). This was a pretty good movie. I got to see it for free, so that was even better. I love Julia Roberts and I have made a goal to watch every single movie she has been in (and will be in the future). As for Clooney, I never really got into his films a whole lot. Honestly, I think this one is better than the remake of Ghostbusters is going to be.

 

3/5 stars.

My favorite of Clooney's movies (that I've seen so far) is "O Brother Where Art Thou?" It's from 2000. I remember seeing the movie in the theater in high school. It takes place during The Great Depression. The title is an homage to "Sullivan's Travels" as "O Brother Where Art Thou?" is the name of a fictional book about The Great Depression that Joel McCrea's character wants to film. The plot is also a modern re-telling of "The Odyssey."

 

My favorite part about this film is the music. It's bluegrass and folk music.

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My favorite of Clooney's movies (that I've seen so far) is "O Brother Where Art Thou?" It's from 2000. I remember seeing the movie in the theater in high school. It takes place during The Great Depression. The title is an homage to "Sullivan's Travels" as "O Brother Where Art Thou?" is the name of a fictional book about The Great Depression that Joel McCrea's character wants to film. The plot is also a modern re-telling of "The Odyssey."

 

My favorite part about this film is the music. It's bluegrass and folk music.

 

Yeah, Might seem impossible, but I damned near WORE OUT my CD of that soundtrack. 

 

CHRIS THOMAS KING, who played TOMMY in the film, is an accomplished blues, R&B guitarist in his own right, and I believed provided much( if not all) his own playing in the film.

 

As for Clooney, I also like the remake of OCEAN'S ELEVEN he did in 2001.  And I long thought DAVID HOLMES' score should have gotten an Oscar nomination at least.

 

A couple of Clooney films I saw other than those were OK, but not much more than that  At least nothing nobody else couldn't have handled just as well.

 

 

Sepiatone

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