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...maybe in a really kick*** touring show of WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF?

I'd sleep on the pavement for a week to see that.

Ya know, Bette and her real life hubby Gary Merrill would have been super as George and Martha. Too bad they were a bit long in the tooth by the time the play was made into a movie.

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Ya know, Bette and her real life hubby Gary Merrill would have been super as George and Martha. Too bad they were a bit long in the tooth by the time the play was made into a movie.

 

actually, Bette was just the right age for the role- Liz Taylor was actually "too young" to play Martha and I think Albee maybe even wrote Martha with Bette in mind (ie the BEYOND THE FOREST references.)

 

i don't think Gary Merrill was good enough to do George and hold his own against her.

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actually, Bette was just the right age for the role- Liz Taylor was actually "too young" to play Martha and I think Albee maybe even wrote Martha with Bette in mind (ie the BEYOND THE FOREST references.)

 

i don't think Gary Merrill was good enough to do George and hold his own against her.

You're probably right, Lorna that Bette was the right age, but she just looked so much older by then.

 

I was thinking originally that the play came out in like the early sixties, when Bette would be like 54, and then the movie was from 1966 and Bette would be like 58. And you are right that Liz was really too young and had to age herself with the weight and gray hair bit, but Bette seemed much more matronly by then.

 

I just can't see her hitting on George Segal, can you?

 

Although I read that she hit on Patrick O'Neal while in a play, and he rebuffed her.

 

Don't you think Merrill's slight timidity could have helped the part. He was good battling her in "AAE". 

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I would have loved to see Fred and Ginger battle it out in "Virginia Woolf." Though from what I've read about Ginger, she seems to be on the conservative side, so she probably wouldn't have done this film.

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Yeah, good point. And not to mention, word was Bette always had trouble dancing backward and in high heels.

 

(...and unlike a certain other lady he was teamed with)

 

;)

Rita Hayworth?

 

;)

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I finally watched The Thirteenth Chair, which I DVR'd some time ago. I totally enjoyed it. It looked familiar -- I realized I had seen the 1937 remake, though I prefer the 1929 version.

 

Margaret Wycherley (in her second film/first talkie) played Madame La Grange,  the medium -- she was excellent. Evidently she played the role on stage -- the play was written by her husband, Bayard Veiller. Their son, Anthony Veiller, was a prolific screen writer who was twice Oscar nominated (for Stage Door and The Killers.)

 

Lugosi was a hoot as the detective.  I particularly liked the performance of an actor named John Davidson, who has a few good scenes before he gets killed off.

 

Noel Coward must have known this play/movie. His Madame Arcati may have been inspired by Madame La Grange.

 

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"Love Me Tonight" (1932)--Directed by Rouben Mamoulian, starring Maurice Chevalier and Jeanette MacDonald.

 

Delightful Paramount Pre-Code musical, with a memorable score by Rodgers and Hart that includes "Mimi", "Lover", "Isn't It Romantic" and more.

 

Those who have seen MacDonald only in MGM movies, with every frill and ruffle starched to the utmost, ought to see this or another of her Pre-Code movies.  She was smart, sassy, and fast with a wisecrack, as well as singing beautifully.  She looks beautiful in a slip or in fancy dress.

 

Myrna Loy was billed fifth, but every line was a sarcastic remark or a one liner, delivered in her inimitable style.  This film freed her from playing Oriental temptresses.

 

I dislike Chevalier, but this is the only film where I find him actually funny.

 

I saw the KINO restoration, on another website.  4/4.

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You know,

 

I like Garbo and Clarence Brown, but man is ANNA CHRISTIE boooooring!

 

Depending on the source, this was either the top grossing or 5th top grossing film of 1930. I guess people living during the Depression and prohibition must have been damn hard up for any kind of entertainment.

 

Paint drying is more compelling than this thing.

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You know,

 

I like Garbo and Clarence Brown, but man is ANNA CHRISTIE boooooring!

 

Depending on the source, this was either the top grossing or 5th top grossing film of 1930. I guess people living during the Depression and prohibition must have been damn hard up for any kind of entertainment.

 

Paint drying is more compelling than this thing.

 

Garbo was a draw. And this was her first talkie. I don't remember it being that bad. BTY, the German version (also with Greta) is much better.

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I recently watched both of these films as part of my 'back from the dead' series.  I agree that Too Many Husbands is superior to My Favorite Wife.  It has lots more energy and the three leads are quite fun in the first half of the picture.  It sags a bit toward the end as it struggles to find a satisfactory ending.

My Favorite Wife suffers from playing out a French farce for far too long: wife number one behind door number three, and wife number two behind door number one.  It become tiresome very early on and Grant is forced to play a really silly character who would be better off telling wife number two what has happened.

Three For the Show (1955) with Betty Gable and Jack Lemmon is an utterly dreadful musical remake of Too Many Husbands that rightfully belongs in the 'I'd Rather Stick Needles in My Eyes than Watch' thread.  It really suffers from absurdist dance numbers born of the 'what can we do different' conundrum.  

The Matrimonial Bed (1930) is practically the same film as well.  It is very dated I'm afraid.

**Spolier Alert** -

p.s.  Re the ending of Too Many Husbands don't you think that Jean dropping her hankie on the floor was an invitation to hubby number two to stay interested?  Perhaps it was a bit too subtle to end the film right there.  I didn't quite like the nightclub dance and switching partners finale.

 

***SPOILER***

 

Re: Arthur dropping the hankie on the floor.  I agree.  I think it was a flirtatious move on Arthur's part toward husband #2 Douglas.  The judge legally ruled that she should remain with her first husband and I almost wonder if the film should have ended there.  Though it would have been lame if Arthur never made the decision herself and had to have legal intervention.  As the ending stands now, I have a feeling that Arthur, MacMurray and Douglas remain in a love triangle, despite the judge legally ruling in MacMurray's favor.  I also have a feeling that Douglas may be more in love with Arthur than she is in love with him.  It sounded like MacMurray and Arthur were in love and when he went missing and was presumed dead, she met Douglas and got together with him out of companionship more than anything. Maybe Arthur should have become a polyandrist.  

 

I was also not a fan of the square dance (or whatever that was in the club), switching partners finale, it was kind of lame.  However, it wasn't as lame as the ending to My Favorite Wife, so there's that.  Lol.

 

I know that My Favorite Wife is the more well known film, however, I do agree with you that it is more entertaining.  I find Jean Arthur preferable over Irene Dunne.  I don't dislike Dunne, but in the films of hers that I've seen, her voice has a lilting quality, a "sing-songy" type voice, ala Billie Burke who drives me up the wall, except for in The Wizard of Oz where her voice fits the character.  I do like Dunne in Theodora Goes Wild.  

 

I've never seen Three For the Show or The Matrimonial Bed.  Another version of this story is Move, Over Darling, which I believe is a direct remake of My Favorite Wife (and the eventual version of Marilyn Monroe's ill-fated Something's Gotta Give).  I prefer 'Darling' over 'Wife.'

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This weekend, I watched SOME LIKE IT HOT at the Los Angeles Theater, one of a handful of classic movie theaters in downtown LA. It is amazing, and I always enjoy seeing the occasional film here, especially as it brings me back to coming here regularly as a child. It seemed completely sold out; on the way out, a senior usher stated there were over 2,000 people. Many people were there for the first time, judging by the response to that question, and a good number were seeing this movie for the first time.

 

Well, SLIH may be criticized by some here for the supposed frequency of showings on TCM, but it really is a funny movie. I hadn't seen it completely in awhile, usually catching bits and pieces when I stumble upon it. So seeing it from the beginning, and in a big screen, was thoroughly enjoyable. The laughs were amazing, confirming its reputation as one of the funniest films ever. Also, several double entendre jokes I caught for the first time, not least due to the reaction of the audience. Of course, the cast is marvelous, and Marilyn in particular, shone in all her beauty and glory. She DOES glow, it seems, and the shimmering of her amazing sparkling, low-cut, backless glittery gowns contributed to this. Just a vision in widescreen.

 

All in all, Truly a memorable evening.

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This weekend, I watched SOME LIKE IT HOT at the Los Angeles Theater, one of a handful of classic movie theaters in downtown LA. It is amaing, and I always enjoy seeing the occasional film here, especially as it brings me back to coming here regularly as a child. It aewmwd completely sold out; on the way out, a senior usher stated over 2,000 people. Many people were there for the first time, judging by the response to that question, and a good number were seeing this movie for the first time.

 

Well, SLIH may be criticized by some here for the supposed frequency of showings on TCM, but it really is a funny movie. I haven't seen it completely in awhile, usually catching bits and pieces when I stumble upon it. So seeing it from the beginning, and in a big screen, was thoroughly enjoyable. The laughs were amazing, confirming its reputation as one of the funniest films ever. Also, several double entendre jokes I caught for the first time, not least due to the reaction of the audience. Of course, the casr is marvelous, and Marilyn in particular, shone in all her beauty and glory. She DOES glow, it seems, and the shimmering of her amazing sparkling, low-cut, backless glittery gowns contributed to this. Just a vision in wifescreen. Truly a memorable evening.

 

That sounds like a great evening Arturo! I saw Some Like it Hot in a theater a couple years ago and my experience was similar to yours--except that being in LA, I bet the experience was even better.  

 

I cannot believe that that gown that Marilyn wears to meet Tony Curtis on the yacht passed the censors.  It's even more scandalous right before that when she's singing "I Wanna Be Loved By You" while being partially ensconced in shadow.  Maybe the film's content overshadowed Marilyn's gown and the censors forgot all about what she was wearing.

 

Jack Lemmon truly makes that film.  Granted I cannot envision anyone else in the lead roles other than Lemmon, Monroe and Curtis, but it's Lemmon's film.  He is hilarious.

 

For some reason, one of my favorite lines of his is when all the girls are in his upper berth and the one girl goes, "I brought crackers" and then proceeds to shove some in Lemmon's mouth.  He goes: "No crackers in bed."  For whatever reason, that line always cracks me up.  I also always laugh when Marilyn accidentally drops him out of the berth and asks if he's okay.  He says: "I'm fine" while lying on the floor.  For whatever reason, the way he says it is funny. 

 

One of my other favorite lines comes from one of George Raft's goons: "Buttermilk" and "my mashie!" 

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Le salaire de la peur (The Wages Of Fear )(1953) Road Trip to Oblivion

 

 

Poster.jpg

 

Directed by  Henri-Georges Clouzot (Diabolique (1955)). The film stars Yves Montand, Charles Vanel, Folco Lulli, Peter Van Eyck, Véra Clouzot, and William Tubbs. Cinematography was by Armand Thirard, music was by Georges Auric.

 

A Film Soleil Noir based on the 1950 French novel "Le salaire de la peur" (lit. "The Salary of Fear") by Georges Arnaud a French expatriate who in 1947 went to Venezuela, working various jobs, a cross-country trucker, a saloon waiter, a taxi driver, a contrebandier and conman. He met many of the wild characters in the tropics who eventually made it into his novels.

 

Clouzot was given the script for Le salaire de la peur after an extended trip to Brazil where he filmed an unfinished documentary Le voyage en Brésil (1950). That trip informed the setting and the various locations/sets for Le salaire de la peur. The delta of the Rhône, Bouches-du-Rhône, France was chosen aptly to represent the desolate South American backwater flytrap.

 

A bunch of oil boomers gone bust scramble for the jobs of driving two Nitroglycerin laden trucks across treacherous terrain to put out an oil well fire 

 

Noirsish%2B16.jpg

 

Clouzot, does a fantastic job of creating edge of your seat suspense. The trucks crawl along through potholes and ruts, and speed through washboard stretches (it smooths the ride), and have to do a see-saw maneuver around a switchback by backing over a dilapidated platform. A huge boulder blocks the road at another bend in the road.

 

You are constantly expecting the works to all get blown to hell at any moment.  The screencaps are from the Criterion DVD. 10/10

 


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This weekend, I watched SOME LIKE IT HOT at the Los Angeles Theater, one of a handful of classic movie theaters in downtown LA. It is amazing, and I always enjoy seeing the occasional film here, especially as it brings me back to coming here regularly as a child. It seemed completely sold out; on the way out, a senior usher stated there were over 2,000 people. Many people were there for the first time, judging by the response to that question, and a good number were seeing this movie for the first time.

 

Well, SLIH may be criticized by some here for the supposed frequency of showings on TCM, but it really is a funny movie. I hadn't seen it completely in awhile, usually catching bits and pieces when I stumble upon it. So seeing it from the beginning, and in a big screen, was thoroughly enjoyable. The laughs were amazing, confirming its reputation as one of the funniest films ever. Also, several double entendre jokes I caught for the first time, not least due to the reaction of the audience. Of course, the cast is marvelous, and Marilyn in particular, shone in all her beauty and glory. She DOES glow, it seems, and the shimmering of her amazing sparkling, low-cut, backless glittery gowns contributed to this. Just a vision in widescreen.

 

All in all, Truly a memorable evening.

 

 

What a great review!

 

Coincidentally, I'm one of those people who carps about SLIH being on TCM a lot, BUT:

 

A. It seems like they "got the memo" and it has not been on as much. My point in kvetching about SLIH being on too often is that even the best movies lose their luster a bit when trotted out time after time after time for Spotlights and Essentials and GP airings- there was a time a couple of years ago, where i found myself parsing apart critically the last act of the movie, with its violations of time and space- something i wouldn't have done if it hadn't been on SO MANY weekend afternoons and in prime time (not only was it always on, but it seemed like it was always on during PRIME VIEWING HOURS.)

 

B. I actually watched it last Friday(?) when it was on for the Billy Wilder tribute. I had not seen any of it since that day a couple of years ago when i found myself nitpicking details at the end because it had aired a dozen times - AND AS SUCH, I remembered why it is such a great movie.

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I cannot believe that that gown that Marilyn wears to meet Tony Curtis on the yacht passed the censors. Maybe the film's content overshadowed Marilyn's gown and the censors forgot all about what she was wearing.

 

Jack Lemmon truly makes that film.  Granted I cannot envision anyone else in the lead roles other than Lemmon, Monroe and Curtis, but it's Lemmon's film.  He is hilarious.

 

 

 

Joan Rivers had a talk show in the 90's and it was glorious. I remember little details from it all the time, and there was one episode I remember distinctly where THE Marilyn gown you mentioned was being auctioned (at Sotheby's?) and Joan had a representative on the show who brought a model with him wearing the very gown.

 

I remember the audience gasping when she came out because

 

1. in color and on TV, it was scandalous, it filmed well in black and white, but in real life- it was basically a giant body stocking with a handful of creatively placed beads and sequins.

 

and

 

2. She was, like, a size sixteen. Marilyn was not a tiny girl, which is fine, and on TV- you could really see: she was an actual woman.

 

ps- I actually hate how TONY CURTIS gets short-shrift in SOME LIKE IT HOT, to me, I really think it's his performance that is the best in the film, I mean- I know Lemmon is having a ball- but when you get down to it, it's Curtis who has the more versatile and challenging role. If I could fudge one Oscar nod for the film, it would not be to include it as a nominee for Best Picture, but it would definitely be to include Curtis among the Best Actor nominees.

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Garbo was a draw. And [ANNA CHRISTIE] was her first talkie. I don't remember it being that bad. BTY, the German version (also with Greta) is much better.

 

It was an early sound film, which combined with everyone's accent and the omnipresent "hiss" on the soundtrack made it REALLY hard to understand what they were saying. Also, as is the case with so many early talkies, everyone hovers together under the mic: they all move together and there were A LOT of static three-person shots on that drab kitchen set that seemed to go on forever. It kind of reminded me of the scene in TAKE THE MONEY AND RUN where Woody Allen escapes from the chain gang, but is still shackled to six other guys and they all have to move in unison.

 

Again, Clarence Brown directed some great movies- but watching this, one would think he was a complete novice- an absolutely minimal use of camera movement, (almost?) NO close-ups, a performance by Garbo that is too mannered and melodramatic, NOTHING to break up the stageyness and theatricality of O'Neil's play- just a total BORE of a movie.

 

edit- ANNA CHRISTIE, ironically, was also the only filmed version of an O'Neil play that was a hit.

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This weekend, I watched SOME LIKE IT HOT at the Los Angeles Theater, one of a handful of classic movie theaters in downtown LA. It is amazing, and I always enjoy seeing the occasional film here, especially as it brings me back to coming here regularly as a child. It seemed completely sold out; on the way out, a senior usher stated there were over 2,000 people. Many people were there for the first time, judging by the response to that question, and a good number were seeing this movie for the first time.

 

Well, SLIH may be criticized by some here for the supposed frequency of showings on TCM, but it really is a funny movie. I hadn't seen it completely in awhile, usually catching bits and pieces when I stumble upon it. So seeing it from the beginning, and in a big screen, was thoroughly enjoyable. The laughs were amazing, confirming its reputation as one of the funniest films ever. Also, several double entendre jokes I caught for the first time, not least due to the reaction of the audience. Of course, the cast is marvelous, and Marilyn in particular, shone in all her beauty and glory. She DOES glow, it seems, and the shimmering of her amazing sparkling, low-cut, backless glittery gowns contributed to this. Just a vision in widescreen.

 

All in all, Truly a memorable evening.

 

Wow. Lucky you. I've seen pictures of the Los Angeles. Beautiful theater.

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That sounds like a great evening Arturo! I saw Some Like it Hot in a theater a couple years ago and my experience was similar to yours--except that being in LA, I bet the experience was even better.  

 

I cannot believe that that gown that Marilyn wears to meet Tony Curtis on the yacht passed the censors.  It's even more scandalous right before that when she's singing "I Wanna Be Loved By You" while being partially ensconced in shadow.  Maybe the film's content overshadowed Marilyn's gown and the censors forgot all about what she was wearing.

 

Jack Lemmon truly makes that film.  Granted I cannot envision anyone else in the lead roles other than Lemmon, Monroe and Curtis, but it's Lemmon's film.  He is hilarious.

 

For some reason, one of my favorite lines of his is when all the girls are in his upper berth and the one girl goes, "I brought crackers" and then proceeds to shove some in Lemmon's mouth.  He goes: "No crackers in bed."  For whatever reason, that line always cracks me up.  I also always laugh when Marilyn accidentally drops him out of the berth and asks if he's okay.  He says: "I'm fine" while lying on the floor.  For whatever reason, the way he says it is funny. 

 

One of my other favorite lines comes from one of George Raft's goons: "Buttermilk" and "my mashie!"

 

It was the first time I've seen it on the big screen, so that was great in itself. The audience feedback always adds immeasurably to this type of experience, where you're familiar with the movie already. They greet everything with applause, the names on the credits, the first views of the stars, the song performances, even the first sighting of the grand old Coronado Hotel. To me, it always feels like old friends on the screen.

 

I agree Lemmon is absolutely perfect, from start to end, and he was the audience favorite. His timing and delivery of the great lines cannot be bettered imho. Perhaps his best comedy performance, which is saying A LOT.

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One part in SLIH that usually tickles me( as well as yours) is when George Raft pauses while walking past one of the goons who's standing there continually flipping a coin and asks something like, "Where'd you learn to do a corny bit like that?"  Poking fun it seems at what was considered one of HIS "trademark" bits. 

 

I may have misquoted Raft's line, but it HAS been a while since I've seen the film, missing it recently due to something or other.....

 

Sepiatone

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LADY BEHAVE (1937)

 

41n46WjqIJL.jpg

 

Do you know about tropes?  

 

  • The sister who's the goof-off, whose life is a mess and the older, proper but repressed sister who is called to bail her out.
  • The sister returns the following morning married to a some millionaire after partying, then is sleeping it off under covers that remain unnoticed by a stranger in the room.
  • Step-children who think they are smarter than the adults and are still clueless.
  • The ex-husband who's sweet, charming, but loves the racehorses more than people. 
  • The millionaire groom who must have been even more drunk than the bride.

 

Sally Eilers is part of this and more in this impostor identity romantic comedy with its share of confusion and "no good deed will go unpunished" bits slipping into slapstick now and then, as she tries to protect the rep of erstwhile sister Patricia Farr.  Grant Mitchell plays the meddling but necessary to explain events godfather to both women, and Neil Hamilton is the slightly befuddled bridegroom. Joseph Schildkraut is a amazing as the pony-loving ex-to Farr, and hard to believe this movie was released near the same time as Schildkraut's unforgettable performance as Dreyfus in THE LIFE OF EMILE ZOLA. 

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Last night I watched Hold Your Man with Jean Harlow and Clark Gable.  I recorded it during Harlow's birthday marathon a few months ago.  It is a pre-code film from 1933.  Gable didn't have his mustache in this film and I'm not sure what to think about it.  I think, like William Powell, he looks better with the mustache.  In some scenes, Gable looked handsome and in others, he just looked goofy.  

 

I really liked this movie.  Jean Harlow wasn't as shrill as she can be in some of her films.  I liked her wise cracking persona in this film and I thought that the latter half of the film demonstrated her dramatic skills.  With that said, this film almost seemed like two different films.  The first half was a typical pre-code with pre-marital sex, crime, suggestive dialogue, the whole nine yards.  The second half of the film had one of my favorite themes--ladies in prison (well it was really a reformatory, but it was pretty much prison).  The second half was much more sentimental and melodramatic.  The girl who kept giving speeches, bemoaning the political issues was annoying, mostly because she was so loud.  I liked Harlow's nemesis, Gypsy.  I also like seeing Miss Trumble (20 years younger, but sounding exactly the same) playing a prison warden.  

 

The ending of the film was sweet.  I like the chemistry between Gable and Harlow.  I really liked her in this film and look forward to seeing more of the Gable/Harlow collaborations.

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