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"New Moon" (1930)--an old operetta with two glorious operatic voices, Lawrence Tibbett (baritone/1st/2nd tenor, although he really strains for the highest notes) & Grace Moore (silky soprano, even when going for the high notes--doesn't have the piercing qualities of highest range MacDonald & mid range or higher range Grayson (thank God!) that make me check for bleeding from the ears.  Is an oddity also because in the film, all sex is an accepted part of life--when a man makes a pass at Tibbett, he simply bats him away like an irritating mosquito.  MGM junked the libretto (script), but kept the complete score.  You can tell Tibbett was a novice actor--he lets emotion run away with him twice & his singing turns into bellowing.  Film has lots of obvious scratches--I know that means it's old, but does that mean another restoration job is needed--I don't have the expertise to know.  TCM--if possible--run this again soon, with a prime time slot, instead of burying it at 4:30 in the morning.

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You're probably right about that...  RO said after Father Takes a Wife that it wasn't a big hit with audiences, that the public wasn't ready for comic fare like this with WWII going on.  But there definitely were comic hits in 1941, so I think the fault is with the script.

 

 

I watched it for the first time last night. Nothing great. It did have some funny lines here and there (Helen Broderick was hilarious) A shame Swanson never found her niche in sound films (until Sunset Blvd.) The talent was there........

 

Cant remember Desi Arnaz ever looking so young or thin!!! (have never seen Too Many Girls) Such a weird plot. The film changes gears midway and goes off in another direction.....

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I wonder what year it was that Joe Kennedy took Gloria, his current mistress to the Kennedy compound in Hyannis Port to have dinner with all the family, including Rose?

 

Even Swanson was admittedly perplexed and amazed at that audacity.

 

I think I would rather date that dapper Menjou than Joe Kennedy.

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I know The Simpsons was funnier! It was the hilarious episode where Homer joins the NRA and becomes a gun fanatic. 

 

Nothing in the movie that I was listening to sounded funny.

 

I'm surprised TCM scheduled this movie in the first Primetime slot.  If it were me, I would have scheduled Stage Door or The Hucksters.  This movie seems more like the type that is typically played during the day.

 

 

Well, I for one was glad something different was in the primetime slot. Stage Door type movies are always on the schedule in primetime. Nice to see something more obscure..........

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I recently watched SCENT OF A WOMAN for the first time in about 10 years. 

 

What an amazing movie.

Al Pacino, of course, is wonderful in his Oscar-winning role as the alcoholic blind retired Lt Col. Frank Slade ("I'm in the dark here!"), but Chris O'Donnell more than holds his own as the prep school student on scholarship who becomes Slade's Thanksgiving weekend caretaker.

O'Donnell's reactions to Pacino during their first scene together are so real and specific. Movie actors so often rely on the camera to do the work for them in reaction shots (and in many cases it's a valid approach), but it's nice to see genuine reactions in a mainstream American movie. 

O'Donnell's Charlie Simms finds himself in New York City with Slade, who states he plans to kill himself after fulfilling a number of goals during the holiday weekend. 

 

Bo Goldman's screenplay (inspired by characters in Dino Risi's PROFUMO DI DONNA, which was adapted from a story by Giovanni Arpino) is funny and moving.

The movie has a Hollywood ending that somehow manages to not feel like one.

 

The movie features an early movie performance from the late Philip Seymour Hoffman (credited as Philip  S. Hoffman). He figures prominently in the prep school subplot.

Gabrielle Anwar appears as a young woman who dances the tango with Pacino in one of the movie's most famous scenes.

 

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I then watched Steve Martin in PENNIES FROM HEAVEN, which I had never seen before. 

 

Another "odd" type of film for film fans especially. Depression era songs play throughout the movie, and the charactors lip synch to illustrate their inner most thoughts. The story line fizzled a bit, but was held up by the stellar performances of Steve Martin, Bernadette Peters & Jessica Harper. 

All the actors absolutely looked "vintage" because of the outstanding costumes, make up & hair. Christopher Walken had a teeny bit part, but he was incredibly convincing and looked as if he stepped right out of the 20's. Bob Mackie was the costumer and his creations were BRILLIANT. He borrowed design directly from Jaynet Gaynor for Peters' hats & dresses. Why not? Gaynor was married to Adrian, who knew exactly how to dress her.

Every musical number made me gasp out loud, the last one for the "Let's Face The Music & Dance" sequence. It was beautiful and amazing Mackie copied Ginger's dress exactly for Peters. Although I think Martin & Peters did an excellent job dancing, you see the brilliance of Astaire/Rogers by comparison.

I also really liked all the banjo music on the soundtrack-I suspect it's Martin playing.

 

Did you notice some of the sets were reproductions of classic Edward Hopper paintings?

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I just watched 'The Blair Witch Project' (1999) again.

 

That movie always affects me. I can always put myself in the position of those kids and feel what they would be feeling if those were actual things being experienced. What a terrifying, [...] trip!

 

Has to be the most effective found footage-themed movie ever - brilliantly marketed back then to provide the most chilling experience possible.

 

I've seen lots of comments at IMDb that "say" the movie isn't scary, but I believe that anyone that can't put them selves in the position those kids are in - that can't feel it - is blocking.

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I just watched 'The Blair Witch Project' (1999) again.

 

That movie always affects me. I can always put myself in the position of those kids and feel what they would be feeling if those were actual things being experienced. What a terrifying, [...] trip!

 

Has to be the most effective found footage-themed movie ever - brilliantly marketed back then to provide the most chilling experience possible.

 

I've seen lots of comments at IMDb that "say" the movie isn't scary, but I believe that anyone that can't put them selves in the position those kids are in - that can't feel it - is blocking.

 

This is the only movie I've ever seen that gave me nightmares...

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I just watched 'The Blair Witch Project' (1999) again.

 

That movie always affects me.

The film affected me too. I was affected with contempt towards myself for buying the hype this film received at the time of its release and by wasting my time and money by going to the show to see this colossal bore.

 

And I wasn't alone in my feelings at the time in that theatre either. As the film ended I remember one of the parons near me commenting, "That's it? What a ripoff." A few minutes later, making a station stop in the washroom (should have done that during the film, but I didn't, kept thinking "This film HAS to get better" - it didn't), I heard a guy at a urinal give his own short critique when he said, "My girlfriend talked me into going to this thing."

 

And to think that I chose this dud to see at the show in 1999 over The Sixth Sense!

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The film affected me too. I was affected with contempt, blah blah blah .......I heard a guy at a urinal give his own short critique when he said, "My girlfriend talked me into going to this thing."

 

As is proven time and time again in these forums, some people have no appreciation for a movie of genuine quality. They just wanna see the same old boring stuff again and again.

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As is proven time and time again in these forums, some people have no appreciation for a movie of genuine quality. They just wanna see the same old boring stuff again and again.

Jittery hand held camera technique in Blair Witch is simply film school stuff. Strictly an amateur night production, and one of the most monotonous wastes of time I ever paid money to see at the show.

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Jittery hand held camera technique in Blair Witch is simply film school stuff. Strictly an amateur night production, and one of the most monotonous wastes of time I ever paid money to see at the show.

And a Shaggy witch story.

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TomJH--Cheer up.  You could have paid to see "Blame It On Rio" (1984)--eye candy galore but NOthing for the mind.

To tell you the truth, filmlover, part of my resentment over Blair Witch is that I chose to see that film at the show over The Sixth Sense (not knowing anything about the latter's twist ending either). I later saw Sixth Sense on video tape, loved it but always sort of wished that I had had the opportuity to experience it with its clever surprises on the big screen.

 

All that Blair Witch hype sucked me in, unfortunately. A friend who saw Blair Witch with me felt identically about that waste of film sprockets, and also wished we had seen the Bruce Willis film at the show instead. She also saw Sixth Sense on home video later and loved it (even though some spoil sport had blurted out the twist ending to her in advance). Dems the breaks.

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I will offer up a low-budget horror film recommendation for those who haven't seen it:

 

     SCREAMS OF A WINTER NIGHT (1979)  Filmed on location in various parts of Louisiana, inc. a college campus.  Lots of grainy fun; I know of no 'restoration' for this film.  I particularly like the ending of this movie.   

 

     William Ragsdale, who later went on to star in 1985's "Fright Night", plays a small part in this film as a young gas station attendant early on.     

 

    

 

 

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Wasn't Ragsdale also in something called "The" (A)? Reaping in 2005?.  Semi effective horror film shot in Maine? Louisiana?  I keep thinking Stephen King had something to do with this film.

 

If it was at least semi effective, then I have a suspicion your gut is telling you wrong about King's involvement.

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Stephen King has fared badly on the big screen--no argument there--but there are 2 tv miniseries based on his work that were relatively well done--the 1979 mini-series "Salems Lot" was very well done--I saw it when it first aired (I was 14)--& the 1996 mini-series "The Stand" wasn't bad--the book is SO much better--the Unedited version is over 1200 pages--but if you want a book to give you nightmares, this is the book--"Night Shift", a book of short stories, opens with a prequel to "Salem's Lot" & ends with a sequel--both are scary--plus a short story that reads like a trial run for "The Stand","Night Surf".

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To tell you the truth, filmlover, part of my resentment over Blair Witch is that I chose to see that film at the show over The Sixth Sense (not knowing anything about the latter's twist ending either). I later saw Sixth Sense on video tape, loved it but always sort of wished that I had had the opportuity to experience it with its clever surprises on the big screen.

 

All that Blair Witch hype sucked me in, unfortunately. A friend who saw Blair Witch with me felt identically about that waste of film sprockets, and also wished we had seen the Bruce Willis film at the show instead. She also saw Sixth Sense on home video later and loved it (even though some spoil sport had blurted out the twist ending to her in advance). Dems the breaks.

I was in San Diego for a month, on business, when Blair Witch was in theaters, and one weekend, a bunch of us went to the local cineplex, where among our choices, was THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT, DEEP BLUE SEA, and the opening night of THE SIXTH SENSE.  Most wanted to see Blair Witch, but that just seemed, to me, like a video, and would play as well at home.  I had no interest in a shark movie, so I decided to see THE SIXTH SENSE.  In the end, everybody agreed and also saw THE SIXTH SENSE.  How happy I am to have made that decision.  We knew nothing about it, and I was thrilled to see it, not only filmed in Philadelphia, where I was born and raised, but also filmed on the street where I grew up!  Regardless of that, it was a remarkable movie-going experience.  Everyone was so engrossed in that film, people sat, breathless, and the reveal was spine tingling.   When I finally saw THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT, I so disliked all the characters, that the only thing that kept me watching was the hope that each one would get killed.  I also came to the conclusion that I detest "found footage" movies.  I've seen a few more, since, and haven't liked a single one.

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I was in San Diego for a month, on business, when Blair Witch was in theaters, and one weekend, a bunch of us went to the local cineplex, where among our choices, was THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT, DEEP BLUE SEA, and the opening night of THE SIXTH SENSE.  Most wanted to see Blair Witch, but that just seemed, to me, like a video, and would play as well at home.  I had no interest in a shark movie, so I decided to see THE SIXTH SENSE.  In the end, everybody agreed and also saw THE SIXTH SENSE.  How happy I am to have made that decision.  We knew nothing about it, and I was thrilled to see it, not only filmed in Philadelphia, where I was born and raised, but also filmed on the street where I grew up!  Regardless of that, it was a remarkable movie-going experience.  Everyone was so engrossed in that film, people sat, breathless, and the reveal was spine tingling.   When I finally saw THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT, I so disliked all the characters, that the only thing that kept me watching was the hope that each one would get killed.  I also came to the conclusion that I detest "found footage" movies.  I've seen a few more, since, and haven't liked a single one.

John, I only wish I had had the wisdom in selection of film that you had in 1999. I'm sure that watching The Sixth Sense on the big screen, and knowing nothing about the plot twists, would have been an exciting, thrilling experience. (Heck, it had to be, I enjoyed it so much when I just watched it on my TV).

 

By the way, that same friend and I who had wasted our time together watching Blair Witch project also went to see Deep Blue Sea. Dumb as that film is, we still laughed at it and had more fun than with the jittery camera in the woods sleep inducer. We particularly enjoyed and were taken by surprise by that moment when two sharks leaped out of the water and tore a prominent cast member into two.

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John, I only wish I had had the wisdom in selection of film that you had in 1999. I'm sure that watching The Sixth Sense on the big screen, and knowing nothing about the plot twists, would have been an exciting, thrilling experience. (Heck, it had to be, I enjoyed it so much when I just watched it on my TV).

 

By the way, that same friend and I who had wasted our time together watching Blair Witch project also went to see Deep Blue Sea. Dumb as that film is, we still laughed at it and had more fun than with the jittery camera in the woods sleep inducer. We particularly enjoyed and were taken by surprise by that moment when two sharks leaped out of the water and tore a prominent cast member into two.

Haha.  I ended up seeing DEEP BLUE SEA, as well, at the same theater, the following weekend.  It was stupid, but fun.

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Stephen King has fared badly on the big screen--no argument there--but there are 2 tv miniseries based on his work that were relatively well done--the 1979 mini-series "Salems Lot" was very well done--I saw it when it first aired (I was 14)--& the 1996 mini-series "The Stand" wasn't bad--the book is SO much better--the Unedited version is over 1200 pages--but if you want a book to give you nightmares, this is the book--"Night Shift", a book of short stories, opens with a prequel to "Salem's Lot" & ends with a sequel--both are scary--plus a short story that reads like a trial run for "The Stand","Night Surf".

 

Yep, the movies never do justice to the writings. Maybe if he wasn't such a damn good writer. I love some of his stuff - Misery, It!, The Shining, Salem's Lot, Firestarter. I just read 'The Stand' for the first time. Long one.

 

I was so disappointed with the tv movie of It!. Probably his most enjoyable book (well, for me anyway).

 

The general consensus of movie/book comparisons for his work seems to be that only 'Carrie' (1976) is a truly good film adaptation. Although, I know 'The Shining' has its fans - of which I'm not really one.

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Yep, the movies never do justice to the writings. Maybe if he wasn't such a damn good writer. I love some of his stuff - Misery, It!, The Shining, Salem's Lot, Firestarter. I just read 'The Stand' for the first time. Long one.

 

I was so disappointed with the tv movie of It!. Probably his most enjoyable book (well, for me anyway).

 

The general consensus of movie/book comparisons for his work seems to be that only 'Carrie' (1976) is a truly good film adaptation. Although, I know 'The Shining' has its fans - of which I'm not really one.

I think CARRIE is a better film than it is a book.  However, I think there are superb film adaptations of THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION, MISERY, THE DEAD ZONE, and, especially, DOLORES CALIBORNE.  Others, such as CHRISTINE, CUJO, THE MIST and some others, are very good.  I think THE SHINING is among the worst film adaptations of a King story.

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To Live And Die In LA (1985) Wow how did I ever miss this one, oh yea I was living in the boonies in Montana. Director: William Friedkin, with William Petersen, Willem Dafoe, John Pankow, John Turturro, Darlanne Fluegel, and Dean Stockwell, on first watch an 8/10 it probably will go up, Neo Noir with a great chase sequence in LA rail yards and in LA River a homage to Roadblock perhaps, great cinematography, watch this if you haven't seen it.

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