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Caged! I'd actually seen this movie once before but last night I watched it again. It seems that night time is the only right time for this film. Anyway, this movie is probably the best example of one of my favorite genres: women in prison. It's a delightful combination of noir, camp and drama. Eleanor Parker gives an excellent performance. Her slow transformation from a naive young woman to a hardened prisoner was fascinating and very realistic. This is especially evident at the end of the film when there is the photographic comparison between her character when she enters prison to when she leaves. I also like that the film does not end on a positive note. It ends bittersweet. On one hand, it's good that she's out, on the other hand, you know that Agnes Moorehead's character has correctly predicted Parker's destiny.

 

Moorehead's prison superintendent character was excellent and is what keeps the film from being over the top. She remains the calm, collected heart of the movie. She's a nice contrast from Hope Emerson's bonkers matron. If Moorehead and Emerson's respective characters had both been over the top nasty, then this film would have definitely been more campy. Likewise, if both characters had been like Moorehead's, then the film would be unrealistic. Emerson's matron was so delightfully horrid that you actually cheer for the Kitty Stark character in the dramatic cafeteria scene.

 

Lee Patrick is such a fantastic character actress and she can play so many different types of characters very well. What's delightful about many of her characterizations is that no matter how refined her character appears on the outside, there's always a layer of trashiness. The possible exception to this from the films of hers I've seen is The Maltese Falcon. In this film, she's known as "The Vice Queen" who runs a shoplifting syndicate and ends up having to serve a short sentence in the prison.

 

This is such a "fun" film (if that's the right word) in the women in prison genre. Ladies They Talk About is another favorite women in prison film of mine, but it is more of a country club prison than the one Eleanor Parker ends up in.

 

This film.had originally been envisioned as starring Bette Davis and Joan Crawford, around 1947. At that time, Davis, Queen of the Lot at Warners, was seeing real competition from Joan, who had just had a celebrated comeback and Oscar with a script Davis rejected. This film was to have been titled "Women Behind Bars". I always envisioned as Crawford doing the part done by Parker, and Davis doing either Moorehead's or Emerson's role. After.reading your comments about the sedate Moorehead and over the top Emerson, I'm inclined to think that the studio might've though these two roles going to Crawford and Davis, respectively. Of course, Parker could've been considered for the pivotal role she played all along.

 

Don't know what happened with the original concept. Probably something to do with the egos involved.Just as well, as CAGED is a Great movie nonetheless, with a perfect.cast as.is.

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"Summer Storm" (1944)--Directed by Douglas Sirk, starring George Sanders, Linda Darnell, and Edward Everett Horton.  Film is based on Chekhov's "The Shooting Party".

 

Film is about a woman who brings disaster to all the men she is involved with.

 

Sanders is excellent as the snob who has his life ruined by a single Indiscretion. For once he is the voice of morality in the film; as his life crumbles, his hypocrisy disappears.

 

Darnell is Excellent in her role.  She shows why men would ruin themselves for her pleasure, and she shows the knowing cruelty of her character.

 

Horton is the very welcome comic relief in the film.  Saw the movie on YT.

 

If I say anything more , I'll give the plot away.  Good film.  3/4.

I really like SUMMER STORM, with some very good performances. I agree with everything you said, except from what I've read, Horton was supposed to be doing a serious role here, as opposed to his usual comic turns. However, in his ardor for Darnell, his elderly role as a count he comes across as buffoonish. This is the only problem I see, but unless you realize he was doing it as serious, he is amusing, and we are predisposed to see it as another of his comic foil roles.

 

Much more effective.in playing against type is 20 year old Linda Darnell, who after 5 years as a sweet girl next door type, relishes the chance to play a temptress. In fact, she did this so well she changed her image forever. Many years later she would be frustrated by producers not considering her for "nice girl" roles.

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I was looking really forward to the Marie Dressler triple feature last night, I had never seen MIN AND BILL (1931) before, even though I am a big fan of precodes and Marie Dressler, and I'm fine with Wally Beery- even when he fails, he tries, and I have to acknowledge the genuine nature of his effort; (really he was the Nick Nolte of his time.)

 

That said, I only watched 25 minutes or so closely and then forgive me, I gave up. There were a few reasons for this, but CHIEF among them was that (IMO) the sound was simply awful. I'm not blaming anybody for this, but honestly- it was so "tinny"- I could not understand a lot of the dialogue. It sounded like it was filmed in a storage shed with the microphone in a box of Saltines across the room.

 

It makes a big difference in one's appreciation of these films when one sees them at their best (I've seen before-and-after versions of GRAND HOTEL and DRACULA when the "HISSSSSSSSSSSSSSS" and pops on the soundtrack have been removed and it was two completely different experiences.)

 

I VERY RARELY make the call that a print of a movie is unwatchable because of sound or picture issues, but I had to make the call on MIN AND BILL last night. 

 

Other than that, I did not care for the long "comic" speedboat chase (which I discovered was copied shamelessly in Dressler's follow-up EMMA)  and I COULD NOT STAND the actress playing Dressler's juvenile (?!?!) stepdaughter and I really wondered what the big honkin' deal about her missing out on the fifth grade to wait tables was when she was BY ALL APPEARANCES ABOUT 22 YEARS OLD.

 

Trust me, ain't a thing you can teach that girl that one week of waiting tables on the waterfront didn't.

 

Anyhoo, I'm sorry Marie and everyone else. If the sound were better, I swear I would've stuck it out- the acting otherwise was fine and it seems like there was a good movie that was being performed before me as through the intercom at the McDonald's drive-thru.

 

I did catch Dressler's other PreCodes REDUCING and POLITICS though (NO SOUND issues on either BTW), and while it took a while to get used to REDUCING, I liked it in the end very much and the story was A DAMN HOOT with tons of potential. I would've loved to've seen this redone with Hopkins and Davis, but The Code would never've allowed it.

 

I was struck and moved very much by POLITICS, and I don't want to turn this thread into a political discussion, but damn: were any of the rest of you moved near to tears by the scene where MARIE's character runs the mayor out of the women's league meeting for his inaction on the local rash of violence and crime and the fact that it is his CONTINUED policy to DO NOTHING about it?

 

It is moments like that when I remember why I love almost everything about TCM- sometimes I AM DOWNRIGHT STUNNED to look into the past and see that- while so many of the things about our world have changed over the last almost hundred years, the struggles, conflicts, issues, scenarios and stories at heart have stayed very much same.

 

PLEASE RERUN "POLITICS" AGAIN TCM!!!!!!!!

 

(AND THANKS)

 

(And I'll let the sound on MIN AND BILL slide, but is there someone you can call on that though? Cuz: damn. )

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"Min and Bill" (1930)--"Stella Dallas on steroids".  That said, Dressler is Magnificent, and is the whole show, although Beery is ok and funny in two or three scenes. 

 

LornaHansonForbes--have you checked with your cable company??  The copy of "Min and Bill" Comcast aired in East TN had negligible hissing; was in much better shape than I'd expected.  If Comcast showed the best print, I'm shocked (and DELIGHTED!)

 

The actress playing Mins' daughter was Dorothy Lee--and she was Irritating.

 

I enjoyed the motorboat chase--it's nice to see the original scene the  filmmakers of the past 80 some years have copied (1997's  "Speed II", ad infinitum)

 

Second the idea of rerunning "Politics" (1932) again, and agree with your ideas.

 

Now, the one you didn't review:

 

"One Romantic Night" (1930)--Dressler again is the best thing in the film.  But she battles a tired script that was dragged out of mothballs, Lillian Gish giving what I hope was her Worst performance (if she was worse than this, I don't want to see it.) and actors who recite their lines like they want to be somewhere else.

 

Gish in particular is bad.  She sounds like she's playing Camille, with all her "Sighs", her general attitude of condescension (the script takes at least 50% of the blame on this one), her projection of exhaustion.  

 

When Dressler is nowhere in sight and Gish dithers about Who she does and doesn't love, and repeatedly turns down her True Love I wanted to scream at the television my version of the old movie theater yell:  "Say YES, *********, so I can turn off the tv and go to sleep!!!!!!!"  1.5/4

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"Min and Bill" (1930)--"Stella Dallas on steroids". That said, Dressler is Magnificent, and is the whole show, although Beery is ok and funny in two or three scenes.

 

LornaHansonForbes--have you checked with your cable company?? The copy of "Min and Bill" Comcast aired in East TN had negligible hissing; was in much better shape than I'd expected. If Comcast showed the best print, I'm shocked (and DELIGHTED!)

 

Now, the one you didn't review:

 

"One Romantic Night" (1930)--Dressler again is the best thing in the film. But5/4

Oops. guess it was a quadruple feature, I went to bed after POLITICS.

 

YES!!!! on the STELLA DALLAS thing. Forgot to bring that up in my Revu.

 

I think my issue with the sound wasn't really in the volume, so much is it was the muffled quality of it. I actually have a pretty old television, maybe that had something to do with it. There also was the fact thay MIN AND BILL seemed to have a lot of exterior shots, they were actually filming on location at the coast, and I'm sure the Pioneer in days of sound recording + Seaside conditions = less-than-ideal soundtrack.

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Lorna, I didn't watch it last night, but when I did watch Min and Bill many years ago, I thought it had that poor, primitive sound quality as well. A lot of films from 29-32 have very tinny, hissy and crackling sound. Just a limitation of the technology and perhaps deterioration of the materials.

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Caged! I'd actually seen this movie once before but last night I watched it again.  It seems that night time is the only right time for this film.  Anyway, this movie is probably the best example of one of my favorite genres: women in prison.  It's a delightful combination of noir, camp and drama.  Eleanor Parker gives an excellent performance.  Her slow transformation from a naive young woman to a hardened prisoner was fascinating and very realistic.  This is especially evident at the end of the film when there is the photographic comparison between her character when she enters prison to when she leaves.  I also like that the film does not end on a positive note.  It ends bittersweet.  On one hand, it's good that she's out, on the other hand, you know that Agnes Moorehead's character has correctly predicted Parker's destiny.  

 

Moorehead's prison superintendent character was excellent and is what keeps the film from being over the top.  She remains the calm, collected heart of the movie.  She's a nice contrast from Hope Emerson's bonkers matron.  If Moorehead and Emerson's respective characters had both been over the top nasty, then this film would have definitely been more campy.  Likewise, if both characters had been like Moorehead's, then the film would be unrealistic.  Emerson's matron was so delightfully horrid that you actually cheer for the Kitty Stark character in the dramatic cafeteria scene.  

 

Lee Patrick is such a fantastic character actress and she can play so many different types of characters very well.  What's delightful about many of her characterizations is that no matter how refined her character appears on the outside, there's always a layer of trashiness.  The possible exception to this from the films of hers I've seen is The Maltese Falcon.  In this film, she's known as "The Vice Queen" who runs a shoplifting syndicate and ends up having to serve a short sentence in the prison.  

 

 

 

In this same vein, you might enjoy Condemned Women 1938, starring Sally Eilers, Anne Shirley, Louis Hayward and Lee Patrick.  Esther Dale is the prison matron in this one.  Louis is kinda blah, but all the women give good performances.  TCM airs this on occasion.

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In this same vein, you might enjoy Condemned Women 1938, starring Sally Eilers, Anne Shirley, Louis Hayward and Lee Patrick.  Esther Dale is the prison matron in this one.  Louis is kinda blah, but all the women give good performances.  TCM airs this on occasion.

 

Thanks for the recommendation!  I love women in prison movies.  I will keep a look out for this one. 

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Thanks for the recommendation!  I love women in prison movies.  I will keep a look out for this one. 

 

I always seem to miss THE COMPANY SHE KEEPS with Jane Greer when TCM airs it.

I saw most of it a few years ago during a mini-tribute to Jane Greer and have been hoping it to see it in full.

For awhile I couldn't t remember the name of it.

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Technically I didn't "just watch" this, it was yesterday morning. Still, I think that's recent enough. Anyway - yesterday morning I watched:

 

The Adventures of Don Juan

 

A classic Errol Flynn adventure/romance, Errol swashes and buckles his way with great style through romantic assignations, imprisonment (at least twice !), wicked power-hungry usurpers, and any number of deftly executed sword fights. Although he was pushing forty by the time Don Juan was made, he seems as young and dashing as ever. In fact the extra ten years he's seen since Robin Hood just give him a bit more seasoned maturity, rendering him if anything even more attractive.

 

This is a rich confection of a movie, full of luxurious sets and sumptuous costumes. I think it won the Oscar for best costumes that year. And deservedly;  the gorgeous luscious costuming is like a character (s) in itself. The men's just as much as the women's !

 

Of course it helps that the film is in colour. That unashamedly bright intense colour that you see in big budget historical dramas back then. I love black and white movies, but I can't imagine an exuberant adventure film like this being in anything but that rich Technicolour from that era.

 

The story itself is great fun, with Errol and his loyal sidekick Leporello  - amusingly played by Alan Hale, who was perfect for this type of long-suffering good-natured faithful servant role -- fighting off evil-doers, rescuing a gentleman from a (very well supplied) torture chamber, and restoring order and justice.But not before a splendid time has been had by all.

 

I really enjoyed watching Errol Flynn, an actor whom I was not really all that familiar with (sorry, speedy !) except for Robin Hood.  I can fully understand why women practically fainted whenever he appeared ( at least in his movies, maybe in real life, too ! ) He was not only wonderfully handsome and charming, he had a warmth - maybe that "star quality" we were talking about recently - that raises him above most other "matinee idols" of the time. He used his eyes very effectively, especially in the scenes where he's trying to express his love for Queen Margaret without actually saying anything. 

 

The point of this kind of movie - costume drama action swashbuckler - is to cram as much action, intrigue, romance, and witty dialogue ( let's not forget that last) into two hours or so as possible. When it's done well, it's a delight.  I'd certainly be delighted to watch The Adventures of Don Juan again. As I said before, it's a rich cupcake of a movie, made with the finest ingredients and highly consumable.

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I always seem to miss THE COMPANY SHE KEEPS with Jane Greer when TCM airs it.

I saw most of it a few years ago during a mini-tribute to Jane Greer and have been hoping it to see it in full.

For awhile I couldn't t remember the name of it.

 

Is that the one with Lisabeth Scott as her probation officer? It's pretty good.

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Miss Wonderly, loved your review of TAODJ!

 

Errol definitely was most dashing and romantic and until I saw his original teeth in a book I own about him, I would have said he was born as an Adonis with perfect everything that he displayed so well in tights and whatever.

 

Another thing that freaked me out a bit about him, was learning of his past profession using such teeth in the removal of that which is nicely called in polite company, Prairie Oysters, at least after they have been cooked.

 

Yes, Errol did have many interesting professions before he became a star, but perhaps that is what made him so worldly and glib in films.
 

They definitely don't make them like him anymore!

 

 

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Is that the one with Lisabeth Scott as her probation officer? It's pretty good.

 

Oh wow.

 

Lizabeth as a parole officer for recently sprung and impressionable chickadees fresh out of stir, now what, OH WHAT, I ask you could possibly go wrong with this scenario?

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Lorna, I didn't watch it last night, but when I did watch Min and Bill many years ago, I thought it had that poor, primitive sound quality as well. A lot of films from 29-32 have very tinny, hissy and crackling sound. Just a limitation of the technology and perhaps deterioration of the materials.

 

I am vindicated.

Thank you.

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Technically I didn't "just watch" this, it was yesterday morning. Still, I think that's recent enough. Anyway - yesterday morning I watched:

 

The Adventures of Don Juan

 

A classic Errol Flynn adventure/romance, Errol swashes and buckles his way with great style through romantic assignations, imprisonment (at least twice !), wicked power-hungry usurpers, and any number of deftly executed sword fights. Although he was pushing forty by the time Don Juan was made, he seems as young and dashing as ever. In fact the extra ten years he's seen since Robin Hood just give him a bit more seasoned maturity, rendering him if anything even more attractive.

 

 

Lovely review of one of my favourite films, MissW.

 

I'd also like to place a special emphasis upon the film's alternately rousing and romantic musical score by Max Steiner and the screenplay's often witty dialogue, which Errol Flynn handles with beautiful delivery.

 

"There's a little bit of Don Juan in every man, and, since I am Don Juan, there must be more of him in me."

 

I've often wondered why Don Juan is not a better known and more celebrated film than it is. In many respects it was the most mature and (as far as humour and overall wit is concerned) sophisticated of Flynn's big costume adventures.

 

DonJuan002.png

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"Stagecoach" (1966)--Directed by Gordon Douglas, starring Ann-Margret, Bing Crosby, and Robert Cummings.

 

Film is definitely not nearly as good as the 1939 classic.  All the anachronisms and continuity goofs don't help.

 

Ann-Margret tries a Southern accent for the first ten minutes of the film, then abandons it; she slips in and out of her accent for the rest of the film.  Sydney Guilaroff gets a separate credit for her hairstyles, which look more like  complicated 1960's hairdos than 1870's. 

 

Crosby is relaxed and underplays his role.  He comes off best among the cast.

 

As a thief, Cummings overacts so irritatingly I wanted to see him eliminated first; no such luck.

 

Van Heflin is reassuringly sturdy and in there working to keep the movie watchable

 

Nobody is as irritating as Slim Pickens.  His howling and yowling about Indians getting them before the stagecoach reaches its destination was like listening to fingernails on a chalkboard.  When an Indian bullet hit him, he Finally shuts up.

 

Two continuity goofs/anachronisms.

 

One annoying character takes an arrow through the heart, then Recovers in five minutes to join in shooting at the Indians.  His bandage disappears through the rest of the film, only to reappear at the end with a red spot on it.

 

In one of their overnight stops, a wok is used for cooking.  

 

Norman Rockwell did the portraits of the cast in the end credits.  Jerry Goldsmith contributed a good musical score, although the song over the closing credits is Unfortunate.

 

An ok remake, not a disaster, just unnecessary.  2.2/4

 

Edit: are multiple copies on YouTube.

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Lovely review of one of my favourite films, MissW.

 

I'd also like to place a special emphasis upon the film's alternately rousing and romantic musical score by Max Steiner and the screenplay's often witty dialogue, which Errol Flynn handles with beautiful delivery.

 

"There's a little bit of Don Juan in every man, and, since I am Don Juan, there must be more of him in me."

 

I've often wondered why Don Juan is not a better known and more celebrated film than it is. In many respects it was the most mature and (as far as humour and overall wit is concerned) sophisticated of Flynn's big costume adventures.

 

 

 

Thanks, Tom.

I actually had meant to say more about the clever dialogue in Don Juan. I did acknowledge it, but only in passing.  In this kind of film, good dialogue is important, because it is a way to show the main character's depth ( as well as intelligence and wit.) Otherwise we have nothing but action, and fun though that is, it could wear a little thin. Intelligent and well-written dialogue in an adventure film fills in and complements the action scenes.

 

Come to think of it, often the two are going on at the same time. Think of all the scenes in "swashbucklers" in which the hero is sparring as readily with his wit as with his sword. It's actually quite funny to think of someone in real life having the energy and presence of mind to come up with apt witticisms while simultaneously leaping about and parrying in a dual. But of course it wasn't real life, it was movies. Hugely entertaining ones, at that.

 

You give a good example of Errol Flynn's / Don Juan's cleverness and ready wit.  And that's just a taste of the kind of dialogue we get throughout the film. For some reason when you hear Flynn's character speak like that, you forget it's just his character, and attribute such wit to Errol Flynn himself.

 

Something else I'd meant to say about Don Juan. In 2016 we are far more aware of the dignity and rights of people of small stature (ok, dwarfs) than they were in 1948. Yet I felt the depiction of the dwarf character (Don Sebastian, played by Jerry Austin) was done with sensitivity and respect. In fact, Sebastian was essential to Don Juan's success in overthrowing the tyrant Duke de Lorca. Pretty unusual for the time the film was made.

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I saw KISS THE BLOOD OFF MY HANDS. Doesn't sound like a Joan Fontaine movie, does it? Set in England, it features some atmospheric film noir sequences, Burt Lancaster as an American soldier who's been in a Nazi prison and has what we would now call PTSD, Joan Fontaine as the upstanding woman whose apartment he sneaks into when he's running away from the cops, and Robert Newton as a thoroughly enjoyable over-the-top villain. Did I mention Burt's shirtless scenes? His eyes are photographed extremely well; I'm not sure if he looks more handsome in any other movie, even TRAPEZE. We even see (or rather, hear) Burt being flogged as part of the English justice system.

 

Fontaine and Lancaster make a reasonably good romantic couple. Director Norman Foster and his cinematographer, Russell Metty, add some noir styling. I found it a very entertaining film noir plus romance. The "oops, gotta follow the Code" ending seems tacked on, but it doesn't spoil the film. Burt Lancaster fans will certainly enjoy it.

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Last night I watched Hold Your Man with Jean Harlow and Clark Gable.  I recorded it during Harlow's birthday marathon a few months ago.  It is a pre-code film from 1933.  Gable didn't have his mustache in this film and I'm not sure what to think about it.  I think, like William Powell, he looks better with the mustache.  In some scenes, Gable looked handsome and in others, he just looked goofy.  

 

I really liked this movie.  Jean Harlow wasn't as shrill as she can be in some of her films.  I liked her wise cracking persona in this film and I thought that the latter half of the film demonstrated her dramatic skills.  With that said, this film almost seemed like two different films.  The first half was a typical pre-code with pre-marital sex, crime, suggestive dialogue, the whole nine yards.  The second half of the film had one of my favorite themes--ladies in prison (well it was really a reformatory, but it was pretty much prison).  The second half was much more sentimental and melodramatic.  The girl who kept giving speeches, bemoaning the political issues was annoying, mostly because she was so loud.  I liked Harlow's nemesis, Gypsy.  I also like seeing Miss Trumble (20 years younger, but sounding exactly the same) playing a prison warden.  

 

The ending of the film was sweet.  I like the chemistry between Gable and Harlow.  I really liked her in this film and look forward to seeing more of the Gable/Harlow collaborations.

I like this one too. I loved Harlow and Gable here, but always feels sad about her untimely passing. She was a really good actress and very appealing in several roles.

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I saw KISS THE BLOOD OFF MY HANDS. Doesn't sound like a Joan Fontaine movie, does it? Set in England, it features some atmospheric film noir sequences, Burt Lancaster as an American soldier who's been in a Nazi prison and has what we would now call PTSD, Joan Fontaine as the upstanding woman whose apartment he sneaks into when he's running away from the cops, and Robert Newton as a thoroughly enjoyable over-the-top villain. Did I mention Burt's shirtless scenes? His eyes are photographed extremely well; I'm not sure if he looks more handsome in any other movie, even TRAPEZE. We even see (or rather, hear) Burt being flogged as part of the English justice system.

 

Fontaine and Lancaster make a reasonably good romantic couple. Director Norman Foster and his cinematographer, Russell Metty, add some noir styling. I found it a very entertaining film noir plus romance. The "oops, gotta follow the Code" ending seems tacked on, but it doesn't spoil the film. Burt Lancaster fans will certainly enjoy it.

It does seem like an incongruous part for Joan, but she was excellent here with Burt. OF course the end was what was expected. Joan exuded love and anxiety. A very beautiful actress and outstanding in every film!
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A Man for all Seasons just finishing awhile ago. This was an over-the-shoulder reading although I think I got most of it. I had seen if before.

 

Is Sir Thomas More stubborn or what? Although he says earlier, pointing to himself, "This is not the stuff of martyrs." Nice bit of foreshadowing in a sort of reverse irony (if there is such a thing). By today's standards, one might have said, "Tom, you are hurting your family, God will understand and forgive you." Even by the standard in Tudor times, he almost comes off as a bit too saintly to believe. There is moral imperative with some religious, spiritual programs, and other disciplines in our own age that allow seeming indiscretions if in the doing (or not doing) if it will prevent others from being hurt, but of course The Catholic Church was anything but that. Back then High Treason was punishable first by drawing and quartering followed by beheading. The King waived the first part out of respect for Thomas More.

 

Paul Schofield was just about perfect. Never a loss for words, that man, even when he is silent. And that little scamp played John Hurt, wonderful as always with him. Vanessa Redgrave as Anne Boleyn looked to happy in that brief glimpse, the real Anne had temperament quite different, yes she had a reason to be happy when we see her but she most likely would have a victorious smirk (what little I know of her). Sweet Lady Alice, I thought funny when More looks at her and says, "Lady Alice, why don't you learn to read." "Heavens no!" she replies. Robert Shaw is a pretty good King. 

 

A great play. It would be fun to see this on stage.

 

Thanks

 

EDIT: Forgot to mention good Orson. In a way it's a real kick seeing him as old Wolsey ... but he was really good.

Edited by laffite
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Well, I have an entire collection of fantasy women in prison movies-even some juvie ones like GIRLS TOWN. Can't wait until TCM shows THE COMPANY SHE KEEPS again! Thanks for the tip!

 

The divide between movies about women in prison and the reality is not even close. MrTiki (who works in a prison) says the new TV dramas that take place in prison still aren't even close to the real thing; they never depict crazy inmates who cover themselves with f e c e s or smuggle drugs in their colon. One actor has more teeth than a real cell block. Very sad reality....definitely not entertaining.

 

I just watched SONG OF FREEDOM 1936, a British film starring Paul Robeson. He is a successful singer who travels to Africa in search of his roots. It has many interesting scenes of the native Africans* and Robeson's reactions. Of course, Robeson shines whenever he's singing. A very interesting unusual story that just couldn't have been made by Hollywood. (until the 70's ROOTS)

 

*also pretty unrealistic by today's standards at least. I have several African neighbors who have never seen primitive people with shields/spears/grass skirts in their lifetime. Maybe they were still around in 1936, but somehow I doubt it was typical.

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