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You give a good example of Errol Flynn's / Don Juan's cleverness and ready wit.  And that's just a taste of the kind of dialogue we get throughout the film. For some reason when you hear Flynn's character speak like that, you forget it's just his character, and attribute such wit to Errol Flynn himself.

 

 

 

Nice to see that Adventures of Don Juan appears to have a new fan in you, MissW. When people talk about the big Flynn adventures, there are always references to Robin Hood, of course, and perhaps Captain Blood and The Sea Hawk. But Don Juan is rarely mentioned, and, as a longtime huge fan of the film, I've always been a little exasperated by that.

 

Flynn brought a world weariness and cynicism to the role that adds credibility and a bit of a sense of depth to the characterization. As much as he is used to climbing balconies and avoiding irate husbands, he's also getting a little tired of the chase. I can't think of another actor who would be his equal in the casting of that part. As a matter of fact, the very casting of Flynn in that role was obviously an attempt by the studio to cash in on his well known reputation as a Don Juan off screen.

 

A couple of other illustrations of the wonderful wit to be found in the film's dialogue:

 

"But you've made love to so many women."

 

"Catherine, an artist may paint a thousand portraits before he achieves one work of art. Would you deny a lover the same practice?"

 

And . . .

 

Just after Don Juan has kissed a beautiful maiden she asks, in regard to the loud noises nearby, "Is that my heart beating so loudly?"

 

"No, beloved," a concerned Don Juan replies, "That's your father at the door."

 

I agree that the film does treat Jerry Austin's dwarf with respect. There is an amusing moment, though, in the fencing academy scene, in which Austin and Alan Hale, standing beside one another, exchange glances in response to a young lady coming on to Don Juan. Austin then looks back at Juan, as does Hale, but a moment later Hale looks back at Austin, staring down at the top of his head. It's funny because it's a brief, silent throwaway moment. Hale has a great deadpan face as he does it, and, while it's a comment on Austin's size, the humour doesn't seem mean spirited at all.

 

DonJuan007.png

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IN RE: OLIVER! (1968)

ME IN BLUE- LHF

 

 

I agree that the kid who played the title role was not memorable, and a bit of a  w uss. Maybe this was just due to the way he was directed. And anyway, even in the Dickens novel Oliver is not the hero of his own story (oh wait that's another Dickens novel....)  the other characters, especially the "bad" ones, are much more interesting.

 

I really like Dickens for the most part, but I'm somewhat "meh" on OLIVER TWIST; too many ridiculous coincidences. That said- I truly think Nancy is one of his greatest creations.

 

Other outstanding leads (Oliver ! is kind of a group effort ): Yes, agreed, the woman who played Nancy, Shani Wallis, is very talented. I love her performances of those songs, "It's a Fine Life"   and "Oom-pah -pah".  She really has style.

 

Damn it. I finally get OOM PAH PAH out of my head and now it's back. Thanks.

 

Ron Moody,who played Fagin. It's always tricky discussing this character, whether depicted in film or the original novel, because of the anti-Semitic element that cannot quite be denied. But Ron Moody makes Fagin very likable. In fact, I've always liked Fagin; Alec Guinness gave us a memorable rendition too.

 

and yet, you know what?- I kind of deny it. the illustrator of the serialized version of TWIST is more to blame for the anti-semitic interpretations of the character, and honestly- as I recall from the book and as is the case in the movie- Fagin is not a BAD bad guy; he is what he is: a guy who's living the only way he can in an ugly world, he happens to be Jewish, but i think it's pretty clear Fagin steals because of the stacking of the socioeconomic conditions and British class system.

 

I've also read OUR MUTUAL FRIEND- which was all right-but noteworthy of a fantastic response from Dickens to all the criticism of Fagin as being anti-semitic; he has a Jewish money lender (money lenders back then were all jews by the way, because laws forbade british christian citizens from lending money) who is acting as a front for the villain, but not bad himself. he is made out by everyone to be a villain and- the whole time- is a decent guy.

 

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PS- can you just imagine the Hell on Earth that would have resulted were Stanley Kubrick the director of OLIVER! ? I can imagine him demanding hundred of re-takes of the OOM PAH PAH scene until extras started dropping dead (and his Nancy would, of course, be played be a frazzled Shelley Duvall.)

 

PSS- Bet Carol Reed would've made a more watchable 2001 though.

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It was independent film night at this historic theatre in Albuquerque, and I went to this event because it was free, and also because my little 10 year old friend from community theatre was in one of these short films. All in all, I was pretty impressed with the films that were shown.

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It was independent film night at this historic theatre in Albuquerque, and I went to this event because it was free, and also because my little 10 year old friend from community theatre was in one of these short films. All in all, I was pretty impressed with the films that were shown.

 

I see your location is "Bermuda Triangle."

GURL: YOU FORGOT TO TAKE THE LEFT TURN!!!!!!!!

Retrace.

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Wait...What?...

This was a thing?! (in the 20th Century...in a Western nation)?!?!

Yes, I was stunned by the f l o g g i n g scene in KISS THE BLOOD OFF MY HANDS, too. Apparently this punishment could be added for crimes deemed especially heinous.

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Yes, I was stunned by the f l o g g i n g scene in KISS THE BLOOD OFF MY HANDS, too. Apparently this punishment could be added for crimes deemed especially heinous.

 

OMG, and in Great Britain, the Good Lord only knows what the term "heinous" could entail- putting your elbows on the table at elevensies, making a bad bid at bridge, hopping over those stupid ******* guard rails they've got up all over their streets in London...

 

ENGLAND was the SINGAPORE of Europe for a time apparently.

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"Romance On The High Seas" (1948)--Amusing Warner Bros. musical fluff, directed by Michael Curtiz, starring Jack Carson, Janis Paige, and Doris Day.

 

The supporting players are the reason for seeing this one.  Fourth billed Day made her debut in this, and was given a good Sammy Cahn/Jule Stein score to sing; the song "It's Magic" is sung twice, proved a mammoth hit with audiences of the time, and propelled Day to film stardom.

 

Oscar Levant is billed fifth, and gets the best lines in the film.

 

A good Warner Bros. musical  throwback to the screwball comedies of the 1930's; 3/4.

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PSS- Bet Carol Reed would've made a more watchable 2001 though.

All anybody had to do to make 2001 more watchable is chop off the pretentious final third.
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All anybody had to do to make 2001 more watchable is chop off the pretentious final third.

Chop off my favorite part with all the pretty colors zooming by and disorienting me to the umpteenth degree?

 

Anathema, Fedya!

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The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat as Performed by

the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of the

Marquis de Sade. (1966).

 

Please, can't you just stab me and get this over with?

 

 

 

 

 

(Wasn't Scrooge a Christian, though perhaps not a very good one?)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
                   
 
         

 

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Oh wow.

 

Lizabeth as a parole officer for recently sprung and impressionable chickadees fresh out of stir, now what, OH WHAT, I ask you could possibly go wrong with this scenario?

 

 

PLENTY! Lisabeth is too dumb for words........and super nice.

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OLIVER! is jyst wrapping up.

 

I think I probably stand in the minority, but really this is my favorite film of 1968 and I'm glad it won best picture.

 

It would have been nice if they had hired a male lead who was masculine or likable or able to carry a tune in any way whatsoever, but it's got so many other pluses and the kid takes a backseat for so much of the film) that i look beyond that

 

What the hell happened to the girl who played Nancy in this? She is WONDERFUL and I don't think she had much of a film career afterwards. Would have made a much better supporting actress nominee then at least one person I can think of who did make the cut that year.

 

In the end though, I actually have to say that my favorite thing about it is Oliver Reed. It's funny because I read that he was the nephew of the director, and as such the director was incredibly resistant to cast him and was accused of nepotism. Surely all of this kvetching and whispering was shut down the minute everyone saw the film. Everytime I see him in something, I'm blown away by what a damn good actor he was and what amazing physicality he had.

 

... of course this is also somewhat tempered by the fact that, I'm not even sure why but, but I am INCREDIBLY attracted to him. There is just something about him that really revs my motor.

 

Oliver! Did nothing for Shani Wallis' film career. Unsure if she even did another film (at least stateside) She probably worked a lot in the U.K. and was a singer, of course. I remember seeing her on a Murder, She Wrote once. The one with Hurd Hatfield in the tropics with snakes and ghosties.....

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Oliver! Did nothing for Shani Wallis' film career. Unsure if she even did another film (at least stateside) She probably worked a lot in the U.K. and was a singer, of course. I remember seeing her on a Murder, She Wrote once. The one with Hurd Hatfield in the tropics with snakes and ghosties.....

OMG!!!!!! I LOOOOOOOOOOVE THAT ******** EPISODE!!!!!!!!!

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West Side Story (1961) - My first time in several years to view it. Musicals really aren't among my favorite genre of movies to begin with, and this was one I've always found overlong and, despite all the obvious talent, a little overwrought. I was sort dreading a new viewing, but forced myself to do it just in case it needed reassessment. 

 

I think what really jumped out at me this time around perhaps more so than in any previous viewing was the condemnation of the poisonous atmosphere of racial intolerance. I'm curious how well the audience of 1961 picked up that message amidst all the beautiful actors and all the beautiful songs. The tragedy of the chain of events leading up to (SPOILER ALERT!) Tony's demise resonated with me more profoundly this time than in any previous viewing. Even though Tony has just killed her lover, Anita is so moved by Maria's pitiable state and recognizes in it echoes of her own love for Bernardo, she goes to warn Tony of the danger he's in when Maria is detained by Schrank. This is an incredibly hopeful moment of seeing beyond the boundaries of one's own culture, but of course, it's all dashed when the Jets torment Anita, treating her as an enemy and a sexual object, These are Rita Moreno's powerhouse final moments in the film, in my mind even more compelling than the performance of "America" (although that's probably what won her the Oscar with voters of the day). One really powerful line of dialogue is when she demands "Let me pass!", and one of the Jets responds, "She can't pass! She's too dark-skinned!" Wow, I don't think I had caught that in previous viewings. "Passing", of course, has been a topic of many heavily dramatic films, including both versions of Imitation of Life and Pinky (and The Human Stain, for a more modern example).

 

I don't know if some of this really biting dialogue is in the original stage production or was added by Ernest Lehman, who certainly has his name attached to many of Hollywood's most acclaimed films. Besides references to "passing", there are references to pregnancy out of wedlock, social diseases, spousal-and-child beating and the really unpleasant revelation that while Schrank kinda hates all the young punks, he hates the Jets less because they're closer to being "white". This is all relatively shocking stuff for a 1961 Hollywood movie.

 

Tragically, after this incident, Anita once again closes her heart and tells the terrible lie that leads directly to Tony's death.

 

My introduction to Richard Beymer and Russ Tamblyn were in the David Lynch-Mark Frost TV series Twin Peaks, in which both had memorable roles and a handful of scenes together. I didn't know anything about the history of classic movies at the time. I'm delighted both are listed among the cast of that show's revival, scheduled to air on Showtime next year, and I hope they will have at least once scene together 55 years-plus after playing best buds in West Side Story. As for Natalie Wood, she's so submerged into the part of Maria, she's almost lacking in any of the traits that would make her distinctive over the rest of the decade, other than her obvious beauty. I know neither she nor Beymer sang, but McKean and O'Toole at least justly praised them for looking good. And of course Moreno and Chakiris won Oscars for their roles. Feels like Tamblyn was perhaps unjustly ignored for a Best Supporting Actor nod as well, although the movie got a ridiculous number of nominations.

 

 

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All anybody had to do to make 2001 more watchable is chop off the pretentious final third. 

 

I'm curious Fedya....

 

Just how would YOU have illustrated those ideas? There was no dialogue, there couldn't be. Would you have a screen shot of the "man" writing in his diary? Would you show him talking to himself? Praying to God?

 

How would you convey the years passing?

 

And then upon man's physical death, how would YOU have illustrated his spiritual voyage to another world? It's inception as a "new" world? The idea that man's spirit lives on as a constant in the universe?

 

I think it's pretty well done as it is.

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I think I know which segment Tiki is going on about.

 

That visual montage that's more an excersize of showing off some nephew's  special effects animation talent than anything that advances the story comprehensively for the viewer.

 

As boring and overdone as the scene in THE DEER HUNTER in which one of the car's passengers, trying to get back in the car, only to have it speed off and return only to speed off again when he reaches the door.  TWO times would have been fine.  But they do it about six or seven.

 

 

Sepiatone

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You think she actually watched it?

 

Hells Yeah.

 

I bet you anything Lo and Roz Russell got BAKED out of their minds, popped some Mescaline Jell-O and TURNED THE **** ON at a midnight showing of 2001 at Radio City in the summer of '68.

 

"Loretta, I can see through tiiiiiiiime!"

"Roz, Roz! Come down, honey, come down- you're on a bad trip!"

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