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"Follow Thru" (1930)--Love and song on the country club golf circuit in this Paramount musical comedy that was filmed in two-tone Technicolor.  Starring Charles Rogers, Nancy Carroll, and Zelma O'Neal. 

 

Rogers is clearly uncomfortable with singing and dancing, although he has a passable voice.

 

Nancy Carroll was made for Technicolor stardom, with her red hair and her green eyes.  Her uncertain soprano didn't really matter for me; her comedic flair, dealing with a less-than-good script and her duets with Rogers ("We'd be a Peach of a Pair" in particular) made up for it.

 

Zelma O'Neal has the choicest part as the heroines' buddy.  She gets some of  the best lines and songs, in particular the one number where Paramount Spent $$--"I Want To Be Bad."  The sight and sound of her leading a band of devilish imps, singing and dancing, flames coming from blaring trumpets/trombones, and a Heavenly Fire Engine are worth seeing the film for.

 

Jack Haley does some cringe-worthy comedy, and periodically stops the film dead in its' tracks.  He does a duet with O'Neal in introducing the standard "Button Up Your Overcoat".

 

A young Eugene Pallette is stuck with comedy lines that don't work, but his ad-libs are gold and on target.

 

Thelma Todd scores as the vamp who's after Rogers; she turns even the most innocent line into a double entendre.

 

According to Richard Barrios' book "A Song In The Dark", about the musicals from 1927--1934, "Follow Thru" was released in the fall of 1930, when audiences had been saturated with Bad musicals, and musicals were flopping at the box-office, regardless of quality.  Paramount sold FT as a comedy, and for its' Technicolor; FT did ok at the box-office, and was one of the last musicals to make a profit until 1933.

 

"Follow Thru"  is one of the better musicals of 1930.  Just know it is wildly uneven, with a constant strength being its' music.  Films' first twenty minutes are slow going.  The lead-in to the first song occurs around the 22:00 minutes mark.  Film is full of double and single entendres that wouldn't have been filmed after The Code was strictly enforced.  2.8/4

 

Edit: Saw the film on YouTube.

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PLENTY! Lisabeth is too dumb for words........and super nice.

Lol. I don't think that's what Lorna was getting at.

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Hells Yeah.

 

I bet you anything Lo and Roz Russell got BAKED out of their minds, popped some Mescaline Jell-O and TURNED THE **** ON at a midnight showing of 2001 at Radio City in the summer of '68.

 

"Loretta, I can see through tiiiiiiiime!"

"Roz, Roz! Come down, honey, come down- you're on a bad trip!"

 

 

LOL. Somehow I doubt that......:D

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Wish TCM would show more Nancy Carroll. One of Paramount's top stars in the early 30s, but forgotten now. :(

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LORNA
Lizabeth as a parole officer for recently sprung and impressionable

chickadees fresh out of stir? Now what, OH WHAT?

I ask you, could possibly go wrong with this scenario?

 

HIBI

PLENTY! Lisabeth is too dumb for words........and super nice.

 

ARTURO

Lol. I don't think that's what Lorna was getting at.

 

LORNA

That is true, good Sir, HOWEVER, "too dumb for words"

is TOTALLY within Lizabeth's (admittedly limited) range,so

 I'm sure she succeeds...although the niceness part

of the role gives me some pause.

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(i don't know how to multiquote and i need to be working on my script instead of puttering online, so i just formatted the replies as a script.)

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LORNA

Lizabeth as a parole officer for recently sprung and impressionable

chickadees fresh out of stir? Now what, OH WHAT?

I ask you, could possibly go wrong with this scenario?

 

HIBI

PLENTY! Lisabeth is too dumb for words........and super nice.

 

ARTURO

Lol. I don't think that's what Lorna was getting at.

 

LORNA

That is true, good Sir, HOWEVER, "too dumb for words"

is TOTALLY within Lizabeth's (admittedly limited) range,so

 I'm sure she succeeds...although the niceness part

of the role gives me some pause.

 

 

 

LOL!

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She's almost unbelievably good in that one.

Well if she was EVER good in a film, I certainly don't believe it.

 

(I still love her tho. even though she wasn't the world's greatest actress, she was electric and a total movie star. I could watch a failed performance of hers 10 times more then the most successful thing some others have done.)

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She's almost unbelievably good in that one.

 

 

More like stupidly good. All she needed was a KICK ME sign on  her back........

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watching WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION for the 1 millionth time, I had to sit up and listen just now to Elsa Lanchester's line:

 

" isn't it terrible what trouble our boys get into when they go overseas? Marrying those dreadful foreigners! I wish the government would do something about these foreign wives, enact an embargo or something."

 

( paraphrased from memory, but you get the gist.)

 

The more things change yada yada yada.....

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"Spring Is Here" (1930)--This First National release is an example of what drove audiences away from musicals in 1930.  It has nothing to offer except  its' Rodgers and Hart score that is sung beautifully by  the cast.  First National made the mistake of throwing out part of the original score and getting other songs to replace them.  Bad Move.  The other songs are undistinguished.

 

 The R&H songs are a semistandard title tune, and "With a Song In My Heart".  Lawrence Gray, Alexander Gray, and Bernice Claire deserve credit for singing the score.

 

The film was released when there was a glut of musicals in competition with it.  It flopped at the box-office.  2/4--one star for the Rodgers and Hart songs, one for the singers.

 

Saw on another website.

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"Cobra Woman" (1944)--Starring Maria Montez, Jon Hall, Sabu, and Lon Chaney Jr., directed by Robert Siodmak.

 

Wonderful Camp classic has Montez as twin sisters, good girl Tollea/Bad Queen Naja of Cobra Island, Hall as her not-too-bright sweetheart, and Sabu as the sidekick.  Tollea and Ramu (Hall) are to be married, but Tollea is kidnapped and taken to Cobra Island, where she is to take over from Naja and rule justly.  Ramu and stowaways Sabu and a very bright chimp go after Tollea.

 

Siodmak directed this brainless adventure film, where ritual dances to the cobra god look like SuperBowl halftime routines gone wrong, the island volcano erupts when the plot demands, and it is shown why wearing high heels is a Bad idea.

 

Movie was on another website, from a faded copy.  Movie was still great fun.  3.3/4 

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"Cobra Woman" (1944)--Starring Maria Montez, Jon Hall, Sabu, and Lon Chaney Jr., directed by Robert Siodmak.

 

Wonderful Camp classic has Montez as twin sisters, good girl Tollea/Bad Queen Naja of Cobra Island, Hall as her not-too-bright sweetheart, and Sabu as the sidekick.  Tollea and Ramu (Hall) are to be married, but Tollea is kidnapped and taken to Cobra Island, where she is to take over from Naja and rule justly.  Ramu and stowaways Sabu and a very bright chimp go after Tollea.

 

Siodmak directed this brainless adventure film, where ritual dances to the cobra god look like SuperBowl halftime routines gone wrong, the island volcano erupts when the plot demands, and it is shown why wearing high heels is a Bad idea.

 

Movie was on another website, from a faded copy.  Movie was still great fun.  3.3/4 

 

I saw this within the last couple of years. It was shown on one of the HD cable channels, either one of the HBO's or Encore HD. The picture was very nice, and the colors very vibrant. I enjoyed the silliness.

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Wish TCM would show more Nancy Carroll. One of Paramount's top stars in the early 30s, but forgotten now.

 

CapitolFest last year (or year before) spotlit Nancy Carroll and the newly restored "Follow Through" was screened along with about 15 others featuring the star. I loved it.

 

TCM can only show (and afford) so much. For real film fans, the rare stuff is often screened at film festivals. Afterward, you even have historians and academics milling in the lobby to discuss it with - or quietly listen in, like I do!

 

I much prefer this to watching a movie alone, sitting at a computer. And I also find it sad TCM misses the opportunity by screening the same old chestnuts at their film festivals.

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Well if she was EVER good in a film, I certainly don't believe it.

 

(I still love her tho. even though she wasn't the world's greatest actress, she was electric and a total movie star. I could watch a failed performance of hers 10 times more then the most successful thing some others have done.)

Me too, I could watch her a lot. But she was outstanding in other films; even in a minor role. Take The Razor's Edge with Tyrone Power, Gene Tierney, etc. She was quite surprising in her role as secretary to a woman of title who did not include Elliott T. (Clifton Webb) on invitation list to a party/ When he was very ill, his friends, Larry (Tyrone) and Somerset Maugham (Herbert Marshall) visited her. Very touching about her subtle tour de force.

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"Cobra Woman" (1944)--Starring Maria Montez, Jon Hall, Sabu, and Lon Chaney Jr., directed by Robert Siodmak.

 

Wonderful Camp classic has Montez as twin sisters, good girl Tollea/Bad Queen Naja of Cobra Island, Hall as her not-too-bright sweetheart, and Sabu as the sidekick.  Tollea and Ramu (Hall) are to be married, but Tollea is kidnapped and taken to Cobra Island, where she is to take over from Naja and rule justly.  Ramu and stowaways Sabu and a very bright chimp go after Tollea.

 

Siodmak directed this brainless adventure film, where ritual dances to the cobra god look like SuperBowl halftime routines gone wrong, the island volcano erupts when the plot demands, and it is shown why wearing high heels is a Bad idea.

 

Movie was on another website, from a faded copy.  Movie was still great fun.  3.3/4

Yes, it is campy, but quite colorful. I have a great copy from a friend. Maria Montez was certainly gorgeous. Wish I looked like that!

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Me too, I could watch her a lot. But she was outstanding in other films; even in a minor role. Take The Razor's Edge with Tyrone Power, Gene Tierney, etc. She was quite surprising in her role as secretary to a woman of title who did not include Elliott T. (Clifton Webb) on invitation list to a party/ When he was very ill, his friends, Larry (Tyrone) and Somerset Maugham (Herbert Marshall) visited her. Very touching about her subtle tour de force.

The person I was referring to in the quote as " not the greatest actress in the world, but really watchable" was actually Lizabeth Scott.

 

I can understand the confusion as I didn't mention her name specifically in the post and we were talking about Lanchester earlier.

 

Elsa Lanchester was an absolutely wonderful actress- and one I will watch in anything at all times.

 

SO WITH YOU on how effective Lanchester is THE RAZORS EDGE, that is not my favorite movie, but she is nothing less than superb and her part and I love her rendition of "The Bonney, Bonney Banks of Loch Lomond."

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"The Sting" (1973)--Piece of nostalgia made in the 1970's, set in the 1930's, teamed Paul Newman and Robert Redford in a comedy about The Big Con--wonderful.

 

I loved the film as a kid and I still enjoyed it as an adult.  Eileen Brennan is especially funny and Scott Joplins' rags, adapted by Marvin Hamlisch, make for one of the best soundtracks of the 1970's.

 

Film won seven Oscars--Best Picture, Best Score, and five others.  This is one of the years Oscar got things right, in my opinion.  3.5/4.

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"The Sting" (1973)--Piece of nostalgia made in the 1970's, set in the 1930's, teamed Paul Newman and Robert Redford in a comedy about The Big Con--wonderful.

 

I loved the film as a kid and I still enjoyed it as an adult.  Eileen Brennan is especially funny and Scott Joplins' rags, adapted by Marvin Hamlisch, make for one of the best soundtracks of the 1970's.

 

Film won seven Oscars--Best Picture, Best Score, and five others.  This is one of the years Oscar got things right, in my opinion.  3.5/4.

The sets are quite good also.

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"Atlantis The Lost Continent" aka "Siren of Atlantis" aka "Atlantis" (1948)--Print I saw was titled ATLC. United Artists stinker that starred Maria Montez.  Film looks like a high school production of "The Desert Song" minus the music.  Montez is the only thing to recommend here, besides a musical score by Michel Michelet that supplies drama whenever the actors don't (whenever Montez is offscreen).  1.7/4--all for Montez.

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Calamity Jane and Sam Bass (1949) starring Yvonne De Carlo and Howard Duff, respectively. This is a fictionalization of the lives of Calam and Sam, but it was decently acted, and had a reasonably good storyline. Watched it on a whim; I'll give it 3/5 stars.

 

Source: YouTube

 

 

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"We're Not Dressing" (1934)--Lunatic Pre-Code musical comedy based on "The Admirable Crichton" stars Bing Crosby and Carole Lombard.  Film starts on a yacht, and plot goes by the songs. Bing Crosby is in fine voice, as is Ethel Merman.  Crosby gets to sing a ballad to a bear.  George and Gracie Allen are memorably funny.  Leon Errol is good.  Look for a young Ray Milland.  The bear roller skating around the yacht is the image that stays with me.  Marvelous musical fluff.  I saw film on another website.  3.7/4.

 

Gracie, to George: "I can't set you free now George; the animals would figure it out!"

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"We're Not Dressing" (1934)--Lunatic Pre-Code musical comedy based on "The Admirable Crichton" stars Bing Crosby and Carole Lombard. Film starts on a yacht, and plot goes by the songs. Bing Crosby is in fine voice, as is Ethel Merman. Crosby gets to sing a ballad to a bear. George and Gracie Allen are memorably funny. Leon Errol is good. Look for a young Ray Milland. The bear roller skating around the yacht is the image that stays with me. Marvelous musical fluff. I saw film on another website. 3.7/4.

 

Gracie, to George: "I can't set you free now George; the animals would figure it out!"

I felt so bad for the bear. I always worry about animals being mistreated on the sets of older movies, in a "less enlightened" age.

 

But not to put a damper on your review, f.l. It was a cute movie. In George Burns' book he wrote that Gracie couldn't get over the "mouth" on Carole Lombard, and loved to tell her friends all the 'shocking' (for that time) things she would say.

 

(I got the sense that Gracie admired her.) ;)

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