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Lorna said:

(Jean Simmons) she had just had her teeth filed because she "looked like Bugs Bunny."

 

Eh, teeth "FILED"? What crazy idea is THAT? Doesn't that ruin the protective enamel?

(elderly horses get their molars filed- "floated"- when they wear unevenly, but people?)

 

is there any other still-living actress who seems more...I don't want to say "forgotten", but it's apt....than Marsha Mason?

 

Oh I agree with you 100%. Marsha Mason was a FORCE of an actress/comedienne in film. Adorable and hugely talented, imho. Seeing her in the recent Neil Simon spotlight, I was amazed at the the range of roles she mastered, making me love her even more.

 

She has aged very well and I'd love to see her in any movie playing a bright but crusty, silver broad. Maybe great film parts just never came her way?

I suspect her heart was on Broadway and like so many others, her grandest performances are lost to the ages.

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It's so nice to see Marsha Mason mentioned.  The last thing I saw her in was Lorna Luft's bio of Judy, with Marsha as Ethel Gumm.  Before that, in Bette Midler's Stella, in the Barbara O'Neil role.  When you see her after an absence, it's like, oh, there she is!  I had the same reaction seeing Diane Baker in The Joy Luck Club as Andrew McCarthy's mother.

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It's so nice to see Marsha Mason mentioned.  The last thing I saw her in was Lorna Luft's bio of Judy, with Marsha as Ethel Gumm.  Before that, in Bette Midler's Stella, in the Barbara O'Neil role.  When you see her after an absence, it's like, oh, there she is!  I had the same reaction seeing Diane Baker in The Joy Luck Club as Andrew McCarthy's mother.

 

She also has a fantastic "cameo" of sorts in THE SILENCE OF THE LAMBS.

I hate to call it a "cameo" because she's just incredible with her brief- but stirring- scene. She kind of makes it more than just a cameo.

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Lorna said:

(Jean Simmons) she had just had her teeth filed because she "looked like Bugs Bunny."

 

Eh, teeth "FILED"? What crazy idea is THAT? Doesn't that ruin the protective enamel?

(elderly horses get their molars filed- "floated"- when they wear unevenly, but people?)

 

 

It's a thing. swear to God.

I've also heard Kim Basinger talk about having it done.

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"Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street" (1982)--Starring Angela Lansbury and George Hearn, score by Stephen Sondheim. Was a filmed stage performance.

 

Fantastic musical--Sung almost all the way through, with some recitative and spoken word mixed in.

 

George Hearn was close to perfect as Todd.  Angela Lansbury was magnificent; her Mrs. Lovett is music hall burlesque, carried as far as it can go.

 

Score demands more than one hearing to catch all the subtleties.

 

Hell of a show.  This is the one to catch, where the score is fully sung.  Hopefully, the next time this is shown, I won't have to stay up all night to see it.

 

TCM, thanks for showing this. 4/4

 

From "A Little Priest"

 

"Have some politician

put it on a bun

can never tell if it may run"

 

Before I saw this on TCM a little bit ago, I was under the serious misapprehension that Ms. Lansbury was of the variety of singer whose genuine love of singing outweighed her actual range and talents (ie in the most extreme case, Linda Lavin.)

 

Hearing her handle Sondheim's gauntlet with her brassy pipes I realized- she really was/is a terrific vocalist, and quite adept at acting while singing to boot.

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I was fortunate enough to have seen Ms. Lansbury bring a MAME revival back to Broadway in 1983.  Quite a thrill, and as I recall I had a pretty good seat.

 

Yeah, I don't doubt that.

I woke up this morning to Lucy massacring MAME.

First thing I thought was that Harvey Fierstein was trying to kill me.

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It's so nice to see Marsha Mason mentioned.  The last thing I saw her in was Lorna Luft's bio of Judy, with Marsha as Ethel Gumm.  Before that, in Bette Midler's Stella, in the Barbara O'Neil role.  When you see her after an absence, it's like, oh, there she is!  I had the same reaction seeing Diane Baker in The Joy Luck Club as Andrew McCarthy's mother.

 

Marsha can occasionally be seen playing FRANKIE HECK'S( Patricia Heaton) Mother on the sitcom THE MIDDLE with JERRY VAN DYKE playing her Father.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Yeah, I don't doubt that.

I woke up this morning to Lucy massacring MAME.

First thing I thought was that Harvey Fierstein was trying to kill me.

 

LOL

 

So, Mame meets Hairspray, eh Lorna?! Might work.

 

(...he croakingly replied)

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Lorna said:

(Jean Simmons) she had just had her teeth filed because she "looked like Bugs Bunny."

 

Eh, teeth "FILED"? What crazy idea is THAT? Doesn't that ruin the protective enamel?

(elderly horses get their molars filed- "floated"- when they wear unevenly, but people?)

 

is there any other still-living actress who seems more...I don't want to say "forgotten", but it's apt....than Marsha Mason?

 

Oh I agree with you 100%. Marsha Mason was a FORCE of an actress/comedienne in film. Adorable and hugely talented, imho. Seeing her in the recent Neil Simon spotlight, I was amazed at the the range of roles she mastered, making me love her even more.

 

She has aged very well and I'd love to see her in any movie playing a bright but crusty, silver broad. Maybe great film parts just never came her way?

I suspect her heart was on Broadway and like so many others, her grandest performances are lost to the ages.

 

Yes, I had it done years ago. (filing) No jokes from the gallery, please.

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I ate a bowl of Grapenuts in 1972, those filed my teeth "naturally".

 

 

Ah grapenuts. I havent eaten that cereal in years. I need to buy a box. (I'm a real cereal freak like Seinfeld!) The trick is to let them soak in milk until they are soft. Heaven!

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ME IN GREEN- LHF

 

Pauline Kael said the same thing---it's all about him!---speaking of Richard III, per Laurence. It can be said likewise about Hamlet. But let's remember something, both are huge roles. They are center stage. They are supposed to dominate. As far as staying in the background, the supporting players can't really do anything that is not set down for them by Shakespeare. Laurence wouldn't have anything do about that. The King gets his big speech at the beginning and then his praying scene at the end. Leartes gets his scenes. And as you mentioned nothing was cut from Ophelia's part, getting that Mad Scene.  FYI-Richard III has more words to speak than any other Shakespeare character with Hamlet coming in second. Hamlet has seven soliloquies in the play, at least two were omitted and the others were truncated. Only the to-be-or-not-to-be was complete. And the absence of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern might have been included if he really wanted to ham it up since Hamlet sees through them and is provided with opportunities of wit and repartee as he runs circles around them (Of course time constraints probably the reason for their absence).

 

I'm, okay with RICHARD III being all about RICHARD III, because- really, the story DEMANDS it and I don't think RICHARD III himself- from beneath the asphalted hillock where he lay stewing in anonymity for years- would have it ANY OTHER WAY. FYI- RICHARD III is maybe my favorite Shakespeare play (neck and neck with HENRY V, although I recall really liking PERICLES, contrarion that I am),

 

I wish they'd start forcing those titles down everyone's throats in high school instead of HAMLET and ROMEO AND JULIET and THE TEMPEST. 

 

Those three are DONE. and- i dunno- i'd rank HAMLET and THE TEMPEST around the middle of his works.

 

I also don't get the romance/fanfic/cult built around Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. They're like the Boba Fett of Shakespearean mythology.

 

 

But even if so much seems displeasing to a viewer, there is always the language to fall back on. That cannot be disappointing, not with a "screen writer" like Shakespeare ;) That's where I was at this latest viewing. I was spellbound by the poetry of it all even though I've heard it so often, Hamlet being the play I am most familiar with. I felt it remarkable that the language was so lucid to the modern audience and yet splendidly Shakespearian at the same time. (The Comedies are more difficult IMO) Many of my prior hang-ups with this version seem to fall away with this latest viewing, so tuned in was I to the "dialogue."

 

the other tip i'd give to anyone looking to teach (or preach) Shakespeare is: DO NOT HAVE YOUR STUDENTS READ SHAKESPEARE. HAVE THEM SEE SHAKESPEARE AND HEAR SHAKESPEARE AND SEE AND HEAR IT DONE RIGHT.

 

And honestly, I would sooner show the 1995 RICHARD III or the 1989 HENRY V maybe even the 1995 OTHELLO and def a good copy of POLANSKI'S MACBETH (although Welles's is not bad, just not as true to the text) or have them attend a really good production of one of the comedies (which, which done well live can really make you get what they're all about.) But I don't think i'd be quick to recommend the Olivier Quartet of films to anyone today looking for a gateway to shakespeare.

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Ah grapenuts. I havent eaten that cereal in years. I need to buy a box. (I'm a real cereal freak like Seinfeld!) The trick is to let them soak in milk until they are soft. Heaven!

I actually tried a second bowl, having let them soak overnight (yes, really..) - still hard as rocks. I liked the flavor, though.

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ME IN GREEN- LHF

 

I'm, okay with RICHARD III being all about RICHARD III, because- really, the story DEMANDS it and I don't think RICHARD III himself- from beneath the asphalted hillock where he lay stewing in anonymity for years- would have it ANY OTHER WAY. FYI- RICHARD III is maybe my favorite Shakespeare play (neck and neck with HENRY V, although I recall really liking PERICLES, contrarion that I am),

 

Hamlet doesn't demand it? Anyway your original point was that actors shouldn't direct themselves, not about the plays themselves.

 

I wish they'd start forcing those titles down everyone's throats in high school instead of HAMLET and ROMEO AND JULIET and THE TEMPEST. 

 

Way back there when I was in HS they wouldn't have done any forcing with any of those three. It was Julius Caesar because (I was told) it was less risque.

 

Those three are DONE. and- i dunno- i'd rank HAMLET and THE TEMPEST around the middle of his works.

 

Hamlet is probably my favorite overall since I seem to come back to it so much. And I believe it would be a good introduction to a newbie. First, the narrative at the beginning is kind of gripping, up until Hamlet talks to the ghost. It might become hazy for the newbie after that but the foundation is set. Second, and very importantly, the "dreadful way they talk in Shakespeare" is largely absent. The language is understandable to a modern ears to a very satisfying way.

 

I also don't get the romance/fanfic/cult built around Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. They're like the Boba Fett of Shakespearean mythology.

 

I don't even know what this is. Some modern thing? Well, I probably wouldn't get it either.

 

You use "Shakespearian mythology" very loosely, no doubt. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are not from mythology, as you know, they are based on some acquaintance or actors or something.

 

Boba Fett, very funny.

 

:)

 

the other tip i'd give to anyone looking to teach (or preach) Shakespeare is: DO NOT HAVE YOUR STUDENTS READ SHAKESPEARE. HAVE THEM SEE SHAKESPEARE AND HEAR SHAKESPEARE AND SEE AND HEAR IT DONE RIGHT.

 

WELL, I would CERTAINLY agree with THAT!!!!!!!!

 

 

 

 

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I have an older TV and couldn't read the note at the end of The L-Shaped Room.

 

Leslie Caron, wow.

 

After listening to Brahms' First Piano Concerto for these many a decade, it was gratifying to hear it  so judiciously used and quite nicely synchronized with some key moments of the film. Now I want to hear it yet again.

 

==

 

 

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"Chandler" (1971)--Not anywhere Near the worst film I've seen on TCM.  That said, there is obvious evidence of Interference from MGM executives.  The editing is horrid (in a scene where it's supposed to be raining, it rains in one frame, and is dry as dust in the next frame--the scene goes on for three minutes, along with the sloppy editing.  The script leaves more questions than it answers.  Leslie Caron and Warren Oates are as good as the script allows.

 

Pointless noir that occasionally shows the ghost of a better film.  2/4.

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Interstellar (2014), on Amazon Prime

 

Good sci-fi tale, if you can manage to sit for almost 3 hours, about a mission to save the planet from some disaster (either global warming, dust bowls, or whoever wins the next presidential election). Matthew McConaughey heads the mission, along with Anne Hathaway and a few others I hadn't seen before. They also have a neat robot named TARS. They fly off to find some previous scientists, who have entered a black hole and settled on several worlds possible for human habitation. Matt Damon plays one of the scientists.

 

You have to like black holes, relativity,  and the fifth dimension (not the pop group) to appreciate this. I didn't know a thing about this film beforehand, so it was a nice surprise to see Michael Caine pop up. And when William Devane showed up, I instinctively blurted out "What's in your safe?"

 

The special effects are fine, but the characters are more interesting, and you do want to see how the situations get resolved. McConaughey is good, but he mumbles on occasion, which drives me nuts. I liked the music score, but at times it drowned out the actors.

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The trick is to let them soak in milk until they are soft. Heaven!

 

Actually, cooking Grape Nuts with milk will soften them to almost a mush & they are delicious. But I actually enjoy them cold & crunchy.

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"Chandler" (1971)--Not anywhere Near the worst film I've seen on TCM.

I didn't see Chandler, but last weekend I watched Sex Kittens Go to College. It's hard to imagine too many movies being much worse than that.

 

Well, there's Dondi, which might be the single worst movie I've seen on TCM.

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The trick is to let them soak in milk until they are soft. Heaven!

 

Actually, cooking Grape Nuts with milk will soften them to almost a mush & they are delicious. But I actually enjoy them cold & crunchy.

 

I heat them up in the microwave and enjoy them either way.  I eat them hot in winter only.

 

Fedya thinks DONDI was the "single worst movie" he's seen on TCM.  I never saw it on TCM, but I will say this....

 

I used to really enjoy the comic strip growing up, and went into watching the movie when it came on somewhere some years back.  It was a sore disappointment. 

 

Not the WORST movie I ever saw.  Couldn't tell ya WHICH movie for me garners that title.  All I can say is, there ARE plenty of others vying for the title!

 

Last night on DECADES I watched a repeat of an old DICK CAVETT show on which MARLON BRANDO appeared.  It was originally aired not too long after the stunt Brando pulled at the Oscars. 

 

He did allude to something that made me think in response to Cavett's question about Brando "downgrading" acting as a profession.   I took his response to mean possibly he didn't think it was anything really special.  And that EVERYBODY is an actor in their own way.  I thought about this and came away with that it seems that when ANYbody walks out their front door, they immediately start putting on an act.

 

I feel this is true of a LOT of people.

 

Even in this forum, there are probably some who AREN'T the same person amongst their family and friends as they appear to us in the boards. 

 

Brando's example was a guy, working in an ad agency, smiling and nodding his head amiably after his boss lays out some boneheaded plan and saying, "That's a good idea, Leonard." in order to "play the game" and keep his job and perhaps win a promotion.

 

I thought it a good point.  AND for all any of you know, I'M just putting on an act!  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

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PS- I didn't watch it yesterday, but there are certain titles to which i distinctly recall a STRONG NEGATIVE REACTION from the folks here on the messageboards.

 

CHANDLER is one of those movies. it aired on a Leslie Caron SOTM a few years back and it and VALENTINO went over with the general population here like an eggfart in an elevator.

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