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ME IN GREEN- LHF

 

 

I'm, okay with RICHARD III being all about RICHARD III, because- really, the story DEMANDS it and I don't think RICHARD III himself- from beneath the asphalted hillock where he lay stewing in anonymity for years- would have it ANY OTHER WAY. FYI- RICHARD III is maybe my favorite Shakespeare play (neck and neck with HENRY V, although I recall really liking PERICLES, contrarion that I am),

 

Hamlet doesn't demand it? Anyway your original point was that actors shouldn't direct themselves, not about the plays themselves.

 

I wish they'd start forcing those titles down everyone's throats in high school instead of HAMLET and ROMEO AND JULIET and THE TEMPEST. 

 

Way back there when I was in HS they wouldn't have done any forcing with any of those three. It was Julius Caesar because (I was told) it was less risque.

 

Those three are DONE. and- i dunno- i'd rank HAMLET and THE TEMPEST around the middle of his works.

 

Hamlet is probably my favorite overall since I seem to come back to it so much. And I believe it would be a good introduction to a newbie. First, the narrative at the beginning is kind of gripping, up until Hamlet talks to the ghost. It might become hazy for the newbie after that but the foundation is set. Second, and very importantly, the "dreadful way they talk in Shakespeare" is largely absent. The language is understandable to a modern ears to a very satisfying way.

 

I also don't get the romance/fanfic/cult built around Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. They're like the Boba Fett of Shakespearean mythology.

 

I don't even know what this is. Some modern thing? Well, I probably wouldn't get it either.

 

You use "Shakespearian mythology" very loosely, no doubt. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are not from mythology, as you know, they are based on some acquaintance or actors or something.

 

Boba Fett, very funny.

 

:)

 

 

the other tip i'd give to anyone looking to teach (or preach) Shakespeare is: DO NOT HAVE YOUR STUDENTS READ SHAKESPEARE. HAVE THEM SEE SHAKESPEARE AND HEAR SHAKESPEARE AND SEE AND HEAR IT DONE RIGHT.

 

WELL, I would CERTAINLY agree with THAT!!!!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am served, and in Technicolor no less!

 

You're right, I'm being too picky about HAMLET...I give it kind of a hard time because it's become THE Go-To Shakespeare because- while good- it's digestable, the metaphors don't need a lot of unpacking, and it seems to embody all the major points of Shakespeare.

 

AND CERTAINLY if my options were to have a room full of kids read HAMLET or try to make any kind of sense out of LOVE'S LABOR'S LOST on the page, I'd choose the former no hesitation (the comedies are almost all NEAR-IMPOSSIBLE to grasp just by cold reading with no translation.)

 

i went to a college that i did not much care for and had to read HAMLET for four different classes and THE TEMPEST for- I kid you not- SIX DIFFERENT CLASSES.

 

so i try to "think outside the box" when it comes to recommending Shakespeare plays; if I had to teach a class, there is NO QUESTION that RICHARD III (or as I like the think of it "RICHARD, AYE-AYE-AYE!!!!!") would be the one I'd use; I also LOVE HENRY V, but- not meaning to get too political here BUT- the comparisons to recent history have changed how I interpret that one. RICHARD II is really goo and not talked about enough (RICHARD IV bored me. sorry) and- again- I recall PERICLES being really a lot of fun. I'd teach KING LEAR and JULIUS CAESAR and OTHELLO and THE MERCHANT OF VENICE before i'd teach HAMLET- just for the sake of my sanity as much as anything else.

 

the ONLY WAY I would try to "teach" one of the comedies would be to take a class to a really good production of one.

 

I'm DONE with THE TEMPEST tho. Don't even want to sit through the version with John Geilgud and all kinds of full frontal male nudity- and if i won't sit through something with full frontal male nudity, TRUST IN ME: I AIN'T GONNA SIT THROUGH IT PERIOD.

 

you make such a good point about JULIUS CAESAR, it DID used to be "the go-to" and now it's as rarely mentioned as PERICLES. I kinda wish- as good as his truncated MACBETH is- that Welles had done a filmed version of his jack-booted, fascist attired production of CAESAR, now that would've been something!

 

i did hesitate in saying "mythology"- maybe "mythos" woudl be a better word? and yeah- there is kind of a "cult" built around Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, some see them as the Felix and Oscar of Shakespeare.

 

a propos of nothing but I read someone referring to LADY MACBETH as "Shakespeare's Mrs. Lockhorn" once and just felt like sharing that.

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I thought it a good point. AND for all any of you know, I'M just putting on an act! ;)

 

Sepiatone

You're really purple, not sepia. :)
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Last night we went to see The Man Who Knew Infinity, about the Indian mathematician S. Ramanujan who went to Cambridge in 1914 to study with (and educate) the mathematician G.S. Hardy. Dev Patel as Ramanujan and Jeremy Irons as Hardy are excellent, as you might expect, as is Toby Jones as Littlewood, another mathematician. Ramanujan had to leave behind his family in India, including a young wife and a strong-willed mother.

 

If this sounds like your kind of film, you will probably like it, for it is well-made. I'm pleased that there is interest in making films about people like Turing, Hawking, and Ramanujan.

 

I wanted to bump this up, since I just saw the movie tonight. I concur with kingrat's assessment. This is a fine film, excellent acting by Irons and Patel, and follows the book pretty faithfully. Hardy's insistence on requiring proofs from Ramanujan was accurate and forms the ongoing conflict between them. One of Ramanujan's published works on "highly composite numbers" (which is mentioned in the film) came with a 50-page proof (not mentioned in the film), so Ramanujan realized the importance of proving his conjectures.

 

I was surprised to see Richard Johnson in a substantial role; for some reason, I thought he was dead.

 

There are some facts the filmmakers decided to change; for instance, Ramanujan's wife was 10 years old when he married her, but she appears to be either late teens or early 20s in the film. Also, Ramanujan's mother is shown as resistant to his going to England, but in reality, she encouraged him to go after she had a vision from a Hindu goddess. But these are minor points. The mathematics was correct, which is always refreshing to see. Ramanujan's name was pronounced differently by various characters throughout the film. I have heard two different pronunciations from two people; one from a former professor who is Indian, and another from a former student who is Indian. So I'm still not sure how to pronounce it.

 

Is it just me, or is Jeremy Irons starting to resemble Boris Karloff?

 

In any event, this film is well worth seeing, and demonstrates that high quality films can still be made without special effects, cheap sex, and mindless violence (not that I don't enjoy that stuff once in awhile).

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An episode of "Here's Lucy" starring Lucille Ball and her two "children" (I use the term loosely as these two were around 16 and 17 when they were on the show lol) Lucie Arnaz and Desi Arnaz, Jr. The episode I watched was the last one of season 2, in which Carol Burnett guest starred. It's always great to see Lucy and Carol together on screen, since they are both really funny and seem to get along very well. 

 

Didn't know this show existed until a little while ago, and finally got around to watching some of it. My mother is now hooked lol 

 

 

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The person I was referring to in the quote as " not the greatest actress in the world, but really watchable" was actually Lizabeth Scott.

 

I can understand the confusion as I didn't mention her name specifically in the post and we were talking about Lanchester earlier.

 

Elsa Lanchester was an absolutely wonderful actress- and one I will watch in anything at all times.

 

SO WITH YOU on how effective Lanchester is THE RAZORS EDGE, that is not my favorite movie, but she is nothing less than superb and her part and I love her rendition of "The Bonney, Bonney Banks of Loch Lomond."

THat's ok. I do the same thing. I was telling one friend about The Spiral Staircase and she thought Barbara Stanwyck was the star. I said, no it was Dorothy McGuire. but it does get confusing. Yes, I loved Elsa singing in The RAzor's Edge. The reason why I love that film is Tyrone Power. He had a very fine and timeless acting style which is hard to describe. I think it was a special quality of earnestness and sincerity in which he played each part. He is even better I think in The Rains Came with Myrna Loy and star-studded cast!

Yes, I am a Lizabeth Scott fan too. I Walk Alone is a special film I like to watch where she is dubbed singing I read, but the music is great in her nightclub. IT is a good story with Burt Lancaster. Sometimes my posts end up in the wrong spot too. I really enjoy your posts and hope you have a great 4th!

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Tonight I am watching The Seventh Veil with the superb James Mason and a wonderful performance by Ann Todd. The movie gets better, it seems, with every viewing!

I hope all my Message Board friends here have a great 4th of July.

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An episode of "Here's Lucy" starring Lucille Ball and her two "children" (I use the term loosely as these two were around 16 and 17 when they were on the show lol) Lucie Arnaz and Desi Arnaz, Jr. The episode I watched was the last one of season 2, in which Carol Burnett guest starred. It's always great to see Lucy and Carol together on screen, since they are both really funny and seem to get along very well. 

 

Didn't know this show existed until a little while ago, and finally got around to watching some of it. My mother is now hooked lol

I loved this show in the 60's and am the same age as Lucie Arnaz. In the first year there were other kids playing Lucy's children. Glad your mom likes it too. Sad that Lucy and Desi had parted. Of course, I Love Lucy was great and I enjoyed many episodes growin up. IT was only a few years later and Here's Lucy came out. IT is pretty comical with Mr. Mooney and Mrs. Carmichael always driving him up the wall. To top it off, she and Vivian get into scrapes.
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An episode of "Here's Lucy" starring Lucille Ball and her two "children" (I use the term loosely as these two were around 16 and 17 when they were on the show lol) Lucie Arnaz and Desi Arnaz, Jr. The episode I watched was the last one of season 2, in which Carol Burnett guest starred. It's always great to see Lucy and Carol together on screen, since they are both really funny and seem to get along very well. 

 

Didn't know this show existed until a little while ago, and finally got around to watching some of it. My mother is now hooked lol

Forgot to mention that Carol Burnett was so funny on Lucy's shows! I used to enjoy watching her show too.
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I am "drinking" a virtual toast to the beautiful Olivia de Havilland who turned 100 today. She was a superb and timeless star in many fine performances. One of my favorite films with Olivia is Gone With the Wind in which she plays the sweet Melanie who marries the man Scarlet loved originally. She is equally superb in Robin Hood, The Dark Mirror and My Cousin Rachel

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Last night, after returning home from being with my wife's hospital bedside all day I tuned into the DECADES channel's BURKE'S LAW "binge".

 

I used to rarely miss an episode of this show back in the early '60's.  It was fun seeing it again.  I always thought it was cool that the producers managed to get so many well known Hollywood "stars" to do guest roles on the show.  If not big names, at least personalities who were familiar to the wide general public.  Last night for instance, there were episodes in which REGINALD GARDINER, PIPPA SCOTT,  ANDY DEVINE,  FERNANDO LAMAS,  CESAR ROMERO,  KEENAN WYNN,  OSKAR HOMOLKA,  AGNES MOOREHEAD,  DICK CLARK, ANDY DEVINE,  WILLIAM SHATNER,  THE SMOTHERS BROTHERS,  all had pivotal roles.  And that list was just the tip of the iceberg!

 

The suave GENE BARRY as a millionaire cop who rode to crime scenes in a Rolls Royce always seemed a hoot to me.

 

 

Sepiatone 

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Last night, after returning home from being with my wife's hospital bedside all day I tuned into the DECADES channel's BURKE'S LAW "binge".

 

I used to rarely miss an episode of this show back in the early '60's.  It was fun seeing it again.  I always thought it was cool that the producers managed to get so many well known Hollywood "stars" to do guest roles on the show.  If not big names, at least personalities who were familiar to the wide general public.  Last night for instance, there were episodes in which REGINALD GARDINER, PIPPA SCOTT,  ANDY DEVINE,  FERNANDO LAMAS,  CESAR ROMERO,  KEENAN WYNN,  OSKAR HOMOLKA,  AGNES MOOREHEAD,  DICK CLARK, ANDY DEVINE,  WILLIAM SHATNER,  THE SMOTHERS BROTHERS,  all had pivotal roles.  And that list was just the tip of the iceberg!

 

The suave GENE BARRY as a millionaire cop who rode to crime scenes in a Rolls Royce always seemed a hoot to me.

 

 

Sepiatone 

 

I caught that episode with Shatner, Lamas and Ansara last night, too. The hipster beatnik scene was fun.

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Last night, after returning home from being with my wife's hospital bedside all day I tuned into the DECADES channel's BURKE'S LAW "binge".

 

I used to rarely miss an episode of this show back in the early '60's.  It was fun seeing it again.  I always thought it was cool that the producers managed to get so many well known Hollywood "stars" to do guest roles on the show.  If not big names, at least personalities who were familiar to the wide general public.  Last night for instance, there were episodes in which REGINALD GARDINER, PIPPA SCOTT,  ANDY DEVINE,  FERNANDO LAMAS,  CESAR ROMERO,  KEENAN WYNN,  OSKAR HOMOLKA,  AGNES MOOREHEAD,  DICK CLARK, ANDY DEVINE,  WILLIAM SHATNER,  THE SMOTHERS BROTHERS,  all had pivotal roles.  And that list was just the tip of the iceberg!

 

The suave GENE BARRY as a millionaire cop who rode to crime scenes in a Rolls Royce always seemed a hoot to me.

 

 

Sepiatone 

 

I also ended up watching 5 episodes of Burke's Law.    I don't remember ever having seen the series but I liked it.   So many actors from movies and up and coming actors like Shatner (playing an artist).  

 

It was great to see noir dame Gloria Grahame as a heroin  addict married to Jack Carter (playing a hockey player which didn't really work).   But Grahame was in fine form in a very dramatic scene.   She still looked fine from what one could see (maybe too fine for an addict).

 

Deborah Walley was in one.   She clearly had grown up from her Gidget Goes Hawaiian days.     

 

Jayne Mansfield played a stripper and what was funny was she was fairly low key (well compared to her over the top film persona).

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I watched "Burke's Law" during its initial run ... Friday nights, I believe. It was always entertaining, and introduced me to a lot of movie stars. Then they changed the show and made him a secret agent. Bad, bad move.

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I am served, and in Technicolor no less!

 

You're right, I'm being too picky about HAMLET...I give it kind of a hard time because it's become THE Go-To Shakespeare because- while good- it's digestable, the metaphors don't need a lot of unpacking, and it seems to embody all the major points of Shakespeare.

 

AND CERTAINLY if my options were to have a room full of kids read HAMLET or try to make any kind of sense out of LOVE'S LABOR'S LOST on the page, I'd choose the former no hesitation (the comedies are almost all NEAR-IMPOSSIBLE to grasp just by cold reading with no translation.)

 

i went to a college that i did not much care for and had to read HAMLET for four different classes and THE TEMPEST for- I kid you not- SIX DIFFERENT CLASSES.

 

so i try to "think outside the box" when it comes to recommending Shakespeare plays; if I had to teach a class, there is NO QUESTION that RICHARD III (or as I like the think of it "RICHARD, AYE-AYE-AYE!!!!!") would be the one I'd use; I also LOVE HENRY V, but- not meaning to get too political here BUT- the comparisons to recent history have changed how I interpret that one. RICHARD II is really goo and not talked about enough (RICHARD IV bored me. sorry) and- again- I recall PERICLES being really a lot of fun. I'd teach KING LEAR and JULIUS CAESAR and OTHELLO and THE MERCHANT OF VENICE before i'd teach HAMLET- just for the sake of my sanity as much as anything else.

 

the ONLY WAY I would try to "teach" one of the comedies would be to take a class to a really good production of one.

 

I'm DONE with THE TEMPEST tho. Don't even want to sit through the version with John Geilgud and all kinds of full frontal male nudity- and if i won't sit through something with full frontal male nudity, TRUST IN ME: I AIN'T GONNA SIT THROUGH IT PERIOD.

 

you make such a good point about JULIUS CAESAR, it DID used to be "the go-to" and now it's as rarely mentioned as PERICLES. I kinda wish- as good as his truncated MACBETH is- that Welles had done a filmed version of his jack-booted, fascist attired production of CAESAR, now that would've been something!

 

i did hesitate in saying "mythology"- maybe "mythos" woudl be a better word? and yeah- there is kind of a "cult" built around Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, some see them as the Felix and Oscar of Shakespeare.

 

a propos of nothing but I read someone referring to LADY MACBETH as "Shakespeare's Mrs. Lockhorn" once and just felt like sharing that.

 

 

Okay, Lorna, I'll give you a pass on Hamlet. Aren't I generous?

 

(please indulge me this reply. I promise after this there will no mo messages on this ... maybe)

 

:D

 

Like "the whole ear of Denmark" you may have been "rankly abused" by those who insisted that Hamlet must present itself times four in college classes and simultaneously at that. Some come by it by chance, some by aforethought, and some have it thrust upon'em. This last sounds like you. Your attitude is fully justified. Even I, nutso about the play, sometime sigh at the "same ole, same ole" quality, but my overall appreciation never varies.

 

The Tempest times six. Talk about thrust. I read this and it did nothing for me. I mentioned to a friend who immediately went into Ah Ha mode and instructed me that this play HAS TO BE SEEN. And then he told me the underlying "secret" of the play (something you hold on to throughout), which I don't even remember now. I have such a great mind.

 

Lorna, overall you are more familiar with the whole of S than I am.

 

You don't like Henry IV. Sorry, indeed. The opening speech is so incredible that I must needs crook the hinges of mine knees so I may follow fawning (indulge my little paraphrases, please.) The two plays (I and II) are peppered with delights. A wonderful mixture of drama and comedy. The Fat Knight, ole rogue. Did you see Chimes at Midnight.

 

I am now curious about Pericles, thank you.

 

Absolutely agree about the comedies. Not easy. Back in college days we were young and like to boast that we did not need annotated Shakespeare, we had the pretense of smartness though it was nothing but false hubris. No matter how ingenious one might be, there's no direct line to understanding the comedies. They are a world apart (i.e. language of the witty barb and obscure allusion) and are deserving of study for basic understanding and full appreciation. Bring on No Fear Shakespeare (oh no, not that).

 

For all the palaver bard-wise I had to look up Lockhorn. Ah, they look familiar now, never read it regularly.

 

Sorry for capping on you about the mythology thing, I knew what you meant. Too bad the madcap creators of B&B* didn't do something touching upon R&G. That might have been good.

 

(*the two little cartoon brats who laughed like GWB. "hink, hink, hink,")

 

Thanks Lorna.

 

:)

 

---

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"Anchors Aweigh" (1945)--Totally predictable plot with a very Irritating Dean Stockwell and a shrill Kathryn Grayson.  The musical numbers save the movie: "The Worry Song" with Jerry and Gene Kelly; "I Fall In Love Too Easily" by Frank Sinatra; the dance number with the little Spanish girl (Sharon McManus), too many others to list.  More good than bad; but musical numbers are spare in the first hour, plentiful afterwards.  But that first hour is Trying when the cast isn't singing.  2.7/4

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"Anchors Aweigh" (1945)--Totally predictable plot with a very Irritating Dean Stockwell and a shrill Kathryn Grayson.  The musical numbers save the movie: "The Worry Song" with Jerry and Gene Kelly; "I Fall In Love Too Easily" by Frank Sinatra; the dance number with the little Spanish girl (Sharon McManus), too many others to list.  More good than bad; but musical numbers are spare in the first hour, plentiful afterwards.  But that first hour is Trying when the cast isn't singing.  2.7/4

 

I didn't mind Dean Stockwell as much as I did Kathryn Grayson.  Ugh.  I cannot stand her.  She's not so bad when she's just standing there in the scene, with her mouth closed.  But MGM seemed to think she was a talented singer.  I beg to differ.  Her operatic shrill screechy singing is horrendous.  I always mute the TV or fast forward when she sings.  

 

The only scene in this movie that she's in that I like is the part when Gene and Frank sing the "I You Knew Susie" song.  Gene and Frank's dance (where they jump on all the cots) is fun as is of course, Gene's dance with Jerry. 

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"Take Me Out to The Ball Game" (1949)--starring Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra, Esther Williams, and Betty Garrett.

 

Film doesn't skimp on the musical numbers; the plot is an excuse for song and dance.  Kelly and Sinatra are very funny as vaudevillians/baseball champions.

 

 Williams has one water ballet to the title song that looks shoehorned into the film, but she's just fine on dry land.  Her sarcastic remarks are dripping with honey, her dancing isn't bad, and her singing is well dubbed.

 

Garrett is especially funny with Sinatra; their number "It's Fate, Baby, It's Fate" is the funniest number in the film.  They seem to bring out the best in each other, and do some inspired clowning in the movie.

 

The films' songs dry up in the last twenty minutes, but film has earned enough good will to coast to the finish line, where it finishes with another song.  An underrated film, and a Fun watch.  3.3/4.

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They Came to Cordura (1959).

 

Not an advertisement for DuPont's polymer fabrics, but a movie that tells us it's going to address the two great fundamental questions that affect mankind: Who am I? and How did I get myself into this movie?

 

Gary Cooper stars as an Army Major in the campaign to find Pancho Villa; due to an act of cowardice he's been made the awards officer, looking for people to write up citations for the Medal of Honor. He winds up with five (Van Heflin, Richard Conte, Tab Hunter, Michael Callen, and Dick York), as well as a military prisoner (Rita Hayworth). He has to take them all back to the fort at Cordura, but complications ensue....

 

The movie is filled with all sorts of tropes. The difficult slog through the desert seems taken from Immortal Sergeant; Cooper's imperative that he not fall asleep is clearly stolen from Along the Great Divide; falling for the prisoner is a crib of 3:10 to Yuma; and on and on.

 

It goes on for two hours, which is at least a half hour too long, and has a nonsense ending, stealing from a scene in The Best Years of Our Lives.

 

Not one of Cooper's best. 5/10.

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They Came to Cordura (1959).

 

Not an advertisement for DuPont's polymer fabrics, but a movie that tells us it's going to address the two great fundamental questions that affect mankind: Who am I? and How did I get myself into this movie?

 

Gary Cooper stars as an Army Major in the campaign to find Pancho Villa; due to an act of cowardice he's been made the awards officer, looking for people to write up citations for the Medal of Honor. He winds up with five (Van Heflin, Richard Conte, Tab Hunter, Michael Callen, and Dick York), as well as a military prisoner (Rita Hayworth). He has to take them all back to the fort at Cordura, but complications ensue....

 

The movie is filled with all sorts of tropes. The difficult slog through the desert seems taken from Immortal Sergeant; Cooper's imperative that he not fall asleep is clearly stolen from Along the Great Divide; falling for the prisoner is a crib of 3:10 to Yuma; and on and on.

 

It goes on for two hours, which is at least a half hour too long, and has a nonsense ending, stealing from a scene in The Best Years of Our Lives.

 

Not one of Cooper's best. 5/10.

I liked it a bit better. It has a recreation of the last US cavalry charge in North America, with the soldiers in the newer Khaki (since 1898) uniforms, and . Hayworth gives her all (literally) to Heflin to get him to sleep. 6/10

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