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I think CARRIE is a better film than it is a book.  However, I think there are superb film adaptations of THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION, MISERY, THE DEAD ZONE, and, especially, DOLORES CALIBORNE.  Others, such as CHRISTINE, CUJO, THE MIST and some others, are very good.  I think THE SHINING is among the worst film adaptations of a King story.

 

I love the movie STAND BY ME, which is based on Stephen King's novella THE BODY.

I've never read the book so I don't know how the two compare, but the movie is one of my favorites. 

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I love the movie STAND BY ME, which is based on Stephen King's novella THE BODY.

I've never read the book so I don't know how the two compare, but the movie is one of my favorites. 

I know a lot of people who love it.  I did not love it, but THE BODY is my favorite story, ever written.

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Are there any major differences in the BODY versus STAND BY ME?

I don't really recall that.  It's been so long since I saw the film.  It was a short story, so I suppose they padded the film, a bit.  It had more to do with the feeling I had reading it (I got so lost in the story, it was a visceral experience). which was not replicated by seeing the movie.  That happens quite often, I suppose.  I don't recall hating it or anything quite so extreme, but I also have never had any desire to see it again.

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Last night I watched Pennies From Heaven with Steve Martin, Bernadette Peters, Jessica Harper and Christopher Walken (in a small part).  This was a strange movie.  I'm not sure if I liked it or didn't like it.  I liked the overall aesthetic of the film.  I loved the costumes and the music.  I found the characters lip syncing to the actual depression era to be amusing, especially when the gender of the performer didn't match that of the character lip syncing.  I also liked Christopher Walken's dancing, though I could have done without the striptease.  I really liked Martin and Peters' version of Fred and Ginger's "Let's Face the Music and Dance" number.  While there were many elements of the film I liked, there was just something odd about this film.  I can't decide how I felt about it.

 

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Tonight I watched The Day Mars Invaded Earth (1963).

 

The plot, very briefly, involves men from Mars who want to stop Earth from exploring their planet.  The Martians travel through the galaxy to inhabit the bodies of a scientist and his family - that is, there is the "real" scientist and his family, and then there are their "body doubles" (the Martians, carrying out their mission).  On top of this grave threat to humankind, there is a subplot as we view a crumbling marriage between the two leads.  But I wondered if anyone who saw it really cared about them... it was definitely a B-picture.   (Kent Taylor and Marie Windsor star as the scientist and his wife). 

 

There were some truly creepy moments in the movie, though.  Claire Fielding (Marie Windsor) learns from her son that there is an open door on the estate property where the family is residing.  She goes to lock it, then hears movement around her.  She becomes scared and hurries on.  Suddenly her husband is standing there, with a look that is malevolent.  "Where are you going, Claire!" he asks in an a threatening voice.  We the audience know that it's really a Martian, but we watch from the point of view of Claire, who's never seen her "husband" this way, and the effect is unsettling.  Another weird scene involves the daughter and her doppelganger - the doppelganger looks at her with evil intent.  Not to mention what the daughter's doppelganger does to the young love interest of the daughter... 

 

One of the best scenes is the ending... which I'm not going to give away. :)

 

Weighing the pros and and the cons of this film, I'd rate it a C-.   ;)

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Last night I watched Pennies From Heaven with Steve Martin, Bernadette Peters, Jessica Harper and Christopher Walken (in a small part).  This was a strange movie.  I'm not sure if I liked it or didn't like it.  I liked the overall aesthetic of the film.  I loved the costumes and the music.  I found the characters lip syncing to the actual depression era to be amusing, especially when the gender of the performer didn't match that of the character lip syncing.  I also liked Christopher Walken's dancing, though I could have done without the striptease.  I really liked Martin and Peters' version of Fred and Ginger's "Let's Face the Music and Dance" number.  While there were many elements of the film I liked, there was just something odd about this film.  I can't decide how I felt about it.

 

I would guess your above "equivocal" opinion of this movie is probably shared by many, Speedy. 

 

(...I at least know that that is pretty much how I always felt about it, anyway)

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For what it's worth, I am a fan of THE SHINING. I think it's a great interpretation of the King novel using images to instill fear & horror rather than dialogue giving it a nighmarish quality.

 

I believe Different Seasons is King's collection of 4 novellas that include:

Rita Hayworth & The Shawshank Redemption (spring)

Apt Pupil (summer)

The Body (autumn)

The Breathing Method (winter)

 

These are all well written stories and as I recall, not "horror" really. As I recall The Body is very close to the Stand By Me interpretation. The scene with the deer seems central to the story and I thought the way it was shown in the movie captured the feeling I had reading the story perfectly. Rob Reiner is a great director.

 

I'm glad you mentioned the costumes in PENNIES FROM HEAVEN speedy. Did you notice in one fantasy dancing scene, Peters' costume changed from a calico dress into the same dress covered in sparkly beads? I thought that was a brilliant design decision. The beads were tiny and sewn (& lit) just right to glitter magically.

 

Not only are there no actors that compare with "golden age" stars, but there doesn't seem to be many costumers with the brilliance of forever youthful Bob Mackie.

At the 2012 TCM Festival:

 

Bob+Mackie+2012+TCM+Classic+Film+Festiva

 

My HERO.

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I too loved Kubrick's The Shining.  But I cannot really comment on whether it is a good interpretation on the King novel because I threw the book in the trash can after reading 100 pages of the dreck.

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Last night, in an effort to clear space off my DVR, I had a "Hitchcock on the DVR" marathon.  Which was supposed to be three films, but I started falling asleep during the end of the second one, so figured I would watch the third film today.  I am trying to cut wayyyyyyyy back on caffeine and soda, so I guess that would account for falling asleep at 10:30pm...

 

Anyway...

 

First up was The Wrong Man.  This was an interesting film.  It's one of those Hitchcock films you never hear about, at least not as much as you do about Psycho, North By Northwest, Vertigo and Rear Window.  I thought Henry Fonda did a great job as the wrongly accused man having to go through the criminal justice system while being completely innocent.  While the film was in black and white, I think Fonda's eyes really made his character and made you feel for this man's situation.  Every stage of the process, the witnesses, the handwriting sample, everything seemed to point toward Fonda being guilty.  I don't know if I cared so much for the Vera Miles storyline, though from Alfred Hitchcock's introduction in the beginning of the film, this was a true story.  I can understand the inclusion of Miles' sanitarium stay storyline if it was a true part of the story.  When she breaks down laughing because all their witnesses are dead, I thought her laughing sounded really forced.  That was really the only part of the film I didn't like.

 

Next up was I Confess.  While I like Montgomery Clift and Anne Baxter, this Hitchcock film wasn't one of my favorites.  I liked the flashback scenes of Clift and Baxter's romance, which they'd have to be flashback scenes as I imagine a priest being in a romantic relationship would not go over well with the public.  I liked the end of the film where the real killer has the standoff with police in the auditorium (I think that's what that room was).  

 

The third film I was going to watch was Foreign Correspondent, but I ended up falling asleep during a little bit of I Confess.  I'm saving this film for today.

 

Right now, I'm watching Santa Fe Trail.  Which I've seen before, but wanted to watch again.  I have a copy of this film, but the quality sucks, so it's nice to see a better print.  I wish Warners would give this film a proper DVD release. 

9d0442d9c6eaec265101a49f936a47bb.jpg

 

Olivia is crazy at the beginning of the film, she's got Errol, with this face, asking her for a kiss goodbye and she turns him down! Definitely not what I would have done ;)

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9d0442d9c6eaec265101a49f936a47bb.jpg

 

 

Speedy, just interjecting here to say that I never found much of a resemblance between Olivia and her sister Joan, however in this particular photo you just posted, I see more of a resemblance than I've ever noticed before.

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Speedy, just interjecting here to say that I never found much of a resemblance between Olivia and her sister Joan, however in this particular photo you just posted, I see more of a resemblance than I've ever noticed before.

I never thought Olivia and Joan looked that much alike either, but I agree, you can see it in this photo.  Even looking at photos of the two of them together, they don't resemble each other too much.

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their voices are very similar though.

Now I'm going to have to watch an Olivia and Joan film back to back to compare.

 

Too bad they had such a fierce feud, it would have been interesting to see the two in a movie together. 

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Something like, "Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?" perhaps?   ;)

Lol.  That would be amazing. 

 

Who would be in the Bette Davis part? Which sister is more evil?

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I never thought Olivia and Joan looked that much alike either, but I agree, you can see it in this photo.  Even looking at photos of the two of them together, they don't resemble each other too much.

I never liked Joan Fontaine, but love Olivia de Havilland.

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Lol.  That would be amazing. 

 

Who would be in the Bette Davis part? Which sister is more evil?

 

Olivia did an evil turn in Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte (it's the cross I bear) to poor maligned Bette Davis in that one, but I would have preferred to see an evil Joan (she could turn those beautiful eyes so evil in a flash) like her role in Ivy (1947).

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... Vittorio De Sica's The Roof (1956) or Il Tetto.  It tells the story of two poverty stricken newlyweds and their struggle to find a place to live in urban Italy.

 

In the film's programme notes it mentions that De Sica used two non-professional actors in the lead roles.  One, Giorgio Listuzzi was actually a soccer star.

 

A few weeks ago I watched Ermano Olmi's The Tree of Wooden Clogs (1978) and in an interview in the dvd extras Olmi says that the way to cast and direct non-professionals is not to demand performances that you would expect of a professional.  In other words, let the 'actors' be themselves.

 

Well, that may have been Olmi's method but it certainly was not true of De Sica.  The performances in The Roof are right up there with anything by professionals.  Gabriella Pollotta and Giorgio Listuzzi display just about every human emotion in this film and do so very well.  This is true of all of De Sica's 'neo-realist' performances.  His direction of children is probably the best in cinema history.  Rinaldo Smirdoni in Shoeshine and Luciano De Ambrosis in The Children Are Watching Us are two prime examples.

 

De Sica was clearly able to draw upon his own experience as one of Italy's top actors when it came time to direct others.  But it is his uncanny ability to see life's truths and to be able to imbue that in his non-actors performances that make him a cut above the rest.

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... Vittorio De Sica's The Roof (1956) or Il Tetto.  It tells the story of two poverty stricken newlyweds and their struggle to find a place to live in urban Italy.

 

In the film's programme notes it mentions that De Sica used two non-professional actors in the lead roles.  One, Giorgio Listuzzi was actually a soccer star.

 

A few weeks ago I watched Ermano Olmi's The Tree of Wooden Clogs (1978) and in an interview in the dvd extras Olmi says that the way to cast and direct non-professionals is not to demand performances that you would expect of a professional.  In other words, let the 'actors' be themselves.

 

Well, that may have been Olmi's method but it certainly was not true of De Sica.  The performances in The Roof are right up there with anything by professionals.  Gabriella Pollotta and Giorgio Listuzzi display just about every human emotion in this film and do so very well.  This is true of all of De Sica's 'neo-realist' performances.  His direction of children is probably the best in cinema history.  Rinaldo Smirdoni in Shoeshine and Luciano De Ambrosis in The Children Are Watching Us are two prime examples.

 

De Sica was clearly able to draw upon his own experience as one of Italy's top actors when it came time to direct others.  But it is his uncanny ability to see life's truths and to be able to imbue that in his non-actors performances that make him a cut above the rest.

 

The final scene in THE CHILDREN ARE WATCHING US: There are no words to describe the power of it.

I wonder what direction De Sica gave to Luciano De Ambrosis.

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