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Le Deuxieme Souffle (1966)

 

Le%2BDeuxieme%2BSouffle%2B1966%2Bposter.

 

Le deuxième souffle is a French Neo Noir policier/gangster thriller. Directed by Jean-Pierre Melville (Bob le Flambeur (1956), Two Men in Manhattan (1959), Le Doulos (1962), Le Samouraï (1967), Le Cercle Rouge (1970),  Un Flic (1972)). The film stars Lino Ventura as Gustave Minda, Paul Meurisse as Inspector Blot and Raymond Pellegrin as Paul Ricci, Marcel Bozzuffi as Jo Ricci, Christine Fabréga as Manouche, Michel Constantin as Alban and Pierre Zimmer as Orloff. Cinematography was by Marcel Combes, and music by Bernard Gérard.

 

Lino Ventura is memorable as Gustave, the hardcase criminal who faces all bad choices. Paul Meurisse is great as the sarcastic and assertive Inspector Blot. 8/10

 

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Full review  on Film Noir/Gangster board and with screencaps from the Criterion DVD. hear: http://noirsville.blogspot.com/2016/06/le-deuxieme-souffle-1966.html

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See, I thought the cavalry charge was tactically idiotic. Just besiege the place.

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Okay, Lorna, I'll give you a pass on Hamlet. Aren't I generous?

 

thank you, my replies are in green:

(lhf)

 

The Tempest times six. Talk about thrust. I read this and it did nothing for me. I mentioned to a friend who immediately went into Ah Ha mode and instructed me that this play HAS TO BE SEEN. And then he told me the underlying "secret" of the play (something you hold on to throughout), which I don't even remember now. I have such a great mind.

 

I think "the secret" is that THE TEMPEST was SHAKESPEARE'S LAST PLAY, and he knew it. Prospero, the magician who has created the island, has (in the end) quite possibly created all of this in his mind because HE is SHAKESPEARE- who has for the first time PUT HIMSELF IN THE PLAY. When Prospero "lays down his staff and his wand" it is the author(S?), laying down his pen and stepping away from the world he has created.

 

(there is also some debate that Shakespeare did not write THE TEMPEST alone and/or died before finishing it and/or was several other people the begin with. either way, he drops the mic on the way out and it's pretty great.)

 

don't be impressed by that analogy, like I said: SIX BLOODY TIMES i had to sit through discussions of that play. and I HATE THAT ******* PRETENTIOUS JULIE TAYMOR PIECE OF CRAP PRODUCTION WITH THE DAMNED OSTRICH EGG PEOPLE!!!!! (see youtube for clips.)

 

Lorna,

 Did you see Chimes at Midnight.?

 

Believe it or not: NO! AND i KNOW I NEED TO!

 

I am now curious about Pericles, thank you.

 

it's been loooooong time, but i recall liking it- it's very simple and uncomplicated (as i recall.)

 

Absolutely agree about the comedies. Not easy. Back in college days we were young and like to boast that we did not need annotated Shakespeare, we had the pretense of smartness though it was nothing but false hubris.

 

Anyone who is not a straight-up scholar who claims they can read LOVE'S LABOR'S LOST without translation or annotation and understand what the **** is going on is a damn, dirty lyin' scoundrel.

 

The comedies use some archaic  terms, it would be like someone 500 years from now trying to understand what TTYL and ROFL meant and why we were always ending statements by a pound sign attached to a couple words or phrases.

 

#Shakespeare, #OutrageousFortune

#PerchanceToDream

 

---

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Last night while watching something else(I forget now what) I peeked in on 2001: A SPACE ODDYSEY.

 

I was tickled to notice that the actual  2001 world didn't look anything like the movie's.

 

I guess in 1968, NObody thought that by before that year PAN AM would be out of business.  Or that space exploration would be sharply reduced due to prohibitive costs.

 

But, they DO call it science FICTION, don't they?

 

 

Sepiatone

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"The Big Broadcast of 1936" (1936)--Starring Jack Oakie, The Nicholas Brothers, Lyda Roberti, Ethel Merman, George Burns and Gracie Allen.

 

Throw logic and sanity out the window. The plot: Oakies' radio station WHY is going to go broke in a week unless he pays off his creditors.  He enters a contest offering $250,000 to the winner.  

 

That is an excuse to hang a series of musical numbers together.  Among the memorable ones:

 

One of the first appearances of The Nicholas Brothers, who were most memorably featured in "Stormy Weather" (1943).  TCM doesn't even list this film among their credits(!?)

 

Jack Oakie is okay; he's not bad.

 

Lyda Roberti gets some of her traditional high kicks in, and is amusingly dizzy.

 

George and Gracie are dependably funny, whether their material is or not.

 

Ethel Merman does a number called "The Animal in Me"; her vocals are danced to by a line of chorus girls and dancing Elephants(!!); the song is amusing on its' own, the dancing takes the film into the realm of the unforgettably Bizarre (think "The Gang's All Here", in black and white).

 

 Film has its' bad points ( a hospital film parody doesn't work and stops the film dead in its tracks for 5-7 minutes;  an "Amos and Andy" sketch creaks and doesn't work).

 

There is more good than bad in this nearly plotless film.  3.2/4

 

Edit: I saw this on archivedotorg.

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Last night while watching something else(I forget now what) I peeked in on 2001: A SPACE ODDYSEY.

 

I was tickled to notice that the actual  2001 world didn't look anything like the movie's.

 

I guess in 1968, NObody thought that by before that year PAN AM would be out of business.  Or that space exploration would be sharply reduced due to prohibitive costs.

 

But, they DO call it science FICTION, don't they?

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Ben made a funny observation while introducing this film last night, Sepia.

 

He mentioned how among other things in which Kubrick's film missed the mark in its 21st century prognostications that it didn't show how once you purchase a UNLV T-shirt online because you think it might be cool to have, you then forever afterward will continue to get all those pop-ups and spam on your computer from everyone out there in the internet with T-shirts for sale!

 

(...well, okay...I chuckled a little bit at that one, anyway) 

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Okay, Lorna, I'll give you a pass on Hamlet. Aren't I generous?

 

thank you, my replies are in green:

(lhf)

 

The Tempest times six. Talk about thrust. I read this and it did nothing for me. I mentioned to a friend who immediately went into Ah Ha mode and instructed me that this play HAS TO BE SEEN. And then he told me the underlying "secret" of the play (something you hold on to throughout), which I don't even remember now. I have such a great mind.

 

I think "the secret" is that THE TEMPEST was SHAKESPEARE'S LAST PLAY, and he knew it. Prospero, the magician who has created the island, has (in the end) quite possibly created all of this in his mind because HE is SHAKESPEARE- who has for the first time PUT HIMSELF IN THE PLAY. When Prospero "lays down his staff and his wand" it is the author(S?), laying down his pen and stepping away from the world he has created.

 

(there is also some debate that Shakespeare did not write THE TEMPEST alone and/or died before finishing it and/or was several other people the begin with. either way, he drops the mic on the way out and it's pretty great.)

 

don't be impressed by that analogy, like I said: SIX BLOODY TIMES i had to sit through discussions of that play. and I HATE THAT ******* PRETENTIOUS JULIE TAYMOR PIECE OF CRAP PRODUCTION WITH THE DAMNED OSTRICH EGG PEOPLE!!!!! (see youtube for clips.)

 

Lorna,

 Did you see Chimes at Midnight.?

 

Believe it or not: NO! AND i KNOW I NEED TO!

 

I am now curious about Pericles, thank you.

 

it's been loooooong time, but i recall liking it- it's very simple and uncomplicated (as i recall.)

 

Absolutely agree about the comedies. Not easy. Back in college days we were young and like to boast that we did not need annotated Shakespeare, we had the pretense of smartness though it was nothing but false hubris.

 

Anyone who is not a straight-up scholar who claims they can read LOVE'S LABOR'S LOST without translation or annotation and understand what the **** is going on is a damn, dirty lyin' scoundrel.

 

The comedies use some archaic  terms, it would be like someone 500 years from now trying to understand what TTYL and ROFL meant and why we were always ending statements by a pound sign attached to a couple words or phrases.

 

#Shakespeare, #OutrageousFortune

#PerchanceToDream

 

---

 

 

RE The Tempest, yes, that's it I believe. I'm going to look into that further.

 

RE The comedies, yep!  What's TTYL mean? (don't bother, I'll look it up)

:blink:

 

RE I leafed through Pericles and took note that it rhymes!!!!!

 

Thanks, Lorna.

 

:)

 

==

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RE The Tempest, yes, that's it I believe. I'm going to look into that further.

 

RE The comedies, yep!  What's TTYL mean? (don't bother, I'll look it up)

:blink:

 

RE I leafed through Pericles and took note that it rhymes!!!!!

 

Thanks, Lorna.

 

:)

 

==

 

The late plays of Shakespeare are of another time, pointing toward the Jacobean style of drama that was to overtake the Elizabethan. Great artists adapt -- it could be that Shakespeare was merely adapting to the changing tastes. Cymbeline certainly is of its time. And perhaps he had hired help with some of the plays.

 

I saw a brilliant production of Pericles at Shakespeare's Globe in London fairly recently. The cover of the program clearly states "by William Shakespeare & George Wilkins." Wonderful production, and it has one of the most moving scenes in the canon -- Pericles reuniting with his daughter Marina; which matches for power Leontes reuniting with Hermione in The Winter's Tale, another late play (which I recently saw on stage with Branagh and Dench).

 

The Tempest, another late play, is one of the greatest. I've heard it referred to as "King Lear in Heaven."

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"Manhattan Mary" aka "Follow The Leader" (1930)--This comedy  stars Ed Wynn, Ginger Rogers, and Ethel Merman in her film debut.

 

Film was based on Broadway musical comedy "Manhattan Mary" and had all songs but one removed for the movie.

 

Your enjoyment of the film will depend on your like/dislike of Wynn.  I disliked him and hated his material.

 

Ginger Rogers is barely recognizable and is hardly there.

 

Ethel Merman gets the only song, "The Devils' Holiday".  It's the best thing in the film.

 

Saw the film on archivedotorg.  Merman's song starts around the 40:00 minute mark.  1.4/4

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I watched YELLOW SKY which I had recorded a while ago following recommendations from fellow posters (I think on the Richard Widmark thread). It was on the Encore Western channel. Gregory Peck and Anne Baxter were also in it. Expertly directed by Wild Bill Wellman. Great photography. It was quite good. Fine performances from all the leads. I was expecially impressed with Anne Baxter; she looked very natural with minimum makeup and costume changes. Sometimes the women in western movies are all Hollywood-glamorized but she looked real and was quite touching in the final scene.

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I watched YELLOW SKY which I had recorded a while ago following recommendations from fellow posters (I think on the Richard Widmark thread). It was on the Encore Western channel. Gregory Peck and Anne Baxter were also in it. Expertly directed by Wild Bill Wellman. Great photography. It was quite good. Fine performances from all the leads. I was expecially impressed with Anne Baxter; she looked very natural with minimum makeup and costume changes. Sometimes the women in western movies are all Hollywood-glamorized but she looked real and was quite touching in the final scene.

Anne Baxter sure "touched" Greg Peck a couple of times in this film ,  I thought he was going to need serious medical attention. :D

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ke his leg.Anne Baxter sure "touched" Greg Peck a couple of times in this film ,  I thought he was going to need serious medical attention. :D

 

He did, mrroberts. He broke his leg during filming. LOL.

 

:)

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"The Vagabond King" (1930)--Starring Jeanette MacDonald, Dennis King, and Lillian Roth.  The print I saw was not the Technicolor print TCM has yet to show.

 

Gawd, these characters are Dim!  They sing beautifully, but where are their brains?  At the disposal of a Dimmer screenplay.   Even with a background hiss and crackle, the music from Rudolf Frimls' operetta is lovely--the additional music from four other composers less so.  All three main stars can sing.  So what's wrong? 

 

One, the screenplay takes the concept "suspension of disbelief", pounds it into the ground, and then throws what's left in the viewers face.  Example:  the viewer is asked to believe MacDonald doesn't recognize the person who is King of France for a week (Please don't ask), even though he saved her life, the vagabond Villon and this new guy look exactly alike, except for being minus a mustache, and both have sung to JM (solos and duets), the final realization is a Total shock to JMs' character.  This is one offense against logic out of many.  For me, part of the charm of operettas is their lack of logic; but there's a line between illogic and idiocy.  The film crosses that line.

 

Two: the "Only a Rose"/nose scene.  MacDonald forever referred to this song as "Only a Nose", because King kept stepping into her closeups during their duet "Only a Rose" (yes, at least three of those goofs made it into the final film).  There's another time during her singing that King's hand creeps into the frame, apparently going for the rose Jeanette is holding to her bosom, and just as I was wondering if he was going to go into Forbidden Territory, the hand Darted back, out of the frame.  Jeanette said she ate garlic before their love scenes.  This scene, and their Lack of chemistry, suggests what a Joy this film was to make.

 

Three: The Battle of the Noses.  Both JM and Dennis King had large noses, which needed careful photography.  Neither star was well treated by the camera.  MacDonald at least had smarts enough to look down or use her veil to cover her nose while singing.  King--well, while he is belting out a song early in the movie, the camera travels almost into his left nostril.  During another song, the camera pulls back and the viewer is treated to a view of his tonsils.  Three times (by my count) they try to kiss without ceding the other the better camera angle; these scenes just end.

 

I saw the movie on another website.  Film is a part of early talkie history, and is very well sung.  2.3/4

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He did, mrroberts. He broke his leg during filming. LOL.

 

:)

 

I sure did not know that. I do know that he was incredibly good looking in YELLOW SKY. S**y with or without the beard. He was always very handsome.

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I was referring to the way cute little Annie was beating poor old Greg up early on. ;)

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I just watched A Letter to Three Wives (1949). Starring Ann Sothern, Jeanne Crain, Kirk Douglas, Linda Darnell, Paul Douglas, Jeffrey Lynn, and Celeste Holm's voice (if you've seen it, you'll understand why I say this). This film was great! I enjoyed the storyline; Vera Caspary helped with the actual screenplay (she wrote the novel version of "Laura"). The original story was entitled "A Letter to Five Wives," but was deemed too lengthy for a movie screenplay, so it was cut down to "Four Wives" with Anne Baxter set to play the fourth wife, but it was still thought of as too long for a movie audience to sit through, so she was scrapped and they just stayed with Ann, Linda, and Jeanne. 

 

Great supporting characters played by Thelma Ritter and Connie Gilchrist. I was wishing the whole time that they would have bigger parts than they did, but alas. 

 

The ending of this film is up to the viewer's opinion... I don't know which theory I want to go with... 

Halfway through the film, I remembered that Mr. Kirk Douglas is still alive... He will be 100 this December 9th. 

 

I was disappointed with how bland Ann Sothern's role was in this film. The first thing I saw with her in it, was "Danger, Love at Work" (1937) where she starred as a rather scatterbrained heiress who was an eternal splinter in Jack Haley's finger, so you can imagine the contrast between the two characters lol. And Jeanne Crain, to an extent, was also rather bland. But I guess their characters aren't supposed to be enigmas, they are supposed to be more of the typical housewife type. Linda Darnell hit it big in this film for me personally (this is the first of her films I've seen so she's off to a great start). Kirk's character was the only guy I cared about in this one, however. 

 

Overall, I would give this film a 4/5. 

 

Source: Redondo Beach Public Library 

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I sure did not know that. I do know that he was incredibly good looking in YELLOW SKY. S**y with or without the beard. He was always very handsome.

 

Yes. He was actually nearly killed when the horse he was riding bolted towards a fence. Instead, it stopped short and fell on him and broke his ankle.

 

It never healed properly and he limped for the rest of his life.

You may have noticed that Gregory limps in one scene then not the next.

 

This is because movies are rarely shot in order.

 

Some scenes were shot before the accident. Others were done afterwards.

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I was referring to the way cute little Annie was beating poor old Greg up early on. ;)

 

Okay, mrroberts.

 

That is true  too. LOL!

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MARATHON MAN---not a great film, but as many individual memorable scenes as any film I can think of. The best are Olivier being recognized on Jewelers' Row by a woman he had abused in the concentration camp, and the final scene, where Olivier was forced to swallow the diamonds. 

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Nick and Nora wrote:

 Linda Darnell hit it big in this film for me personally (this is the first of her films I've seen so she's off to a great start).

 

I love "Letter to Three Wives!"  It's where I first discovered the awesome beauty of Linda Darnell.  Her part in this is a great tear jerking story in itself.

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MARATHON MAN---not a great film, but as many individual memorable scenes as any film I can think of. The best are Olivier being recognized on Jewelers' Row by a woman he had abused in the concentration camp, and the final scene, where Olivier was forced to swallow the diamonds. 

 

I always thought it was a VERY good film.  One of the few book-to-film adaptations that stay close to true of it's source.  Of course it helps that the book's author also adapted the screenplay.

 

It seems a lot of people I know who saw it never caught on about the homosexual relationship between  "Doc" and Janeway("Janey")

 

My DENTIST at the time, although liking the movie, got quickly tired of all the "Is it safe?" jokes his patients would lay on him.

 

DGF----I think those are memorable scenes too, but I would add:

 

When Janeway confronts the neighborhood Puerto Rican gang busting into  Hoffman's apartment with a gun, they look at him nonplussed and smoothly pull out all THEIR heat!

 

 

Sepiatone

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I always thought it was a VERY good film.  One of the few book-to-film adaptations that stay close to true of it's source.  Of course it helps that the book's author also adapted the screenplay.

 

It seems a lot of people I know who saw it never caught on about the homosexual relationship between  "Doc" and Janeway("Janey")

 

My DENTIST at the time, although liking the movie, got quickly tired of all the "Is it safe?" jokes his patients would lay on him.

 

DGF----I think those are memorable scenes too, but I would add:

 

When Janeway confronts the neighborhood Puerto Rican gang busting into  Hoffman's apartment with a gun, they look at him nonplussed and smoothly pull out all THEIR heat!

 

 

Sepiatone

In general, Schlesinger provided a very eerie look and feel to the film, which also was a plus.

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"Let's Go Native" (1930)--Amusing bit of Paramount fluff, starring Jeanette MacDonald, Jack Oakie, and Kay Francis, directed by Leo McCarey.  This would have been unfilmable after The Code took effect.

 

Joan (Jeanette MacDonald) wakes up to her furniture being repossessed by her creditors workmen.  After dressing, she serenades them at the piano before it's taken out the door.  She and a slimmer Eugene Pallette exchange double entendres while she drives to work--he talking about her car, she thinking the remarks are about her.

 

MacDonald is the reason to watch this.  Away from MGM, before she was layered in starched and frilled clothing in period operettas, she was charming and at ease exchanging double entendres.

 

Jack Oakie is irritating except when he sings.

 

Kay Francis is a fine surprise.  She is the Vamp and Joans' competition.  Francis shows off a good singing voice, and purrs the double entendres.  She's very funny.

 

My favorite lines:

 

Joan, to a fellow castaway--"Where are we?"

Castaway--"I figure this Was one of The Virgin Islands, but it drifted"

 

Joan to castaway--"Who were you, Before?"

Castaway--"I was to be Master of Ceremonies, but they threw me overboard"  

 

I saw movie on another website.  Film would get a higher rating if I'd seen a better copy.  2.8/4

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"Paramount on Parade" (1930)--One of the studio revues that acted as a sound test for its' performers.

 

Among the good numbers in PoP are: Maurice Chevalier in "Sweeping the Clouds Away",he and Evelyn Brent doing a rhythmic, scored explanation of the origins of the Apache dance, George Bancroft and Kay Francis in a party scene, Ruth Chatterton singing "My Marine" to a group of Marines (one of whom is a very young Fredric March).

 

Clara Bow is one of the films' surprises.  From everything I've read, she had a hopeless Bronx accent.  She has no real accent when she sings "True to the Navy".

 

There are no major duds in the film, a surprise.  Some of the skits induce yawns now, instead of laughter, but they're over quickly.  Saw film on another website.  2.9/4  

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I've been enjoying the first evening of Keith Carradine introducing the westerns.

 

I just finished watching The Searchers again.

 

Fort Apache is next.

 

 

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