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I think Carradine is a good choice for the intos to Westerns.  He used to host the HISTORY CHANNEL's "Wild West Tech" series and other shows about the time period on that channel.  And being a member of the Carradine "dynasty" doesn't hurt either.  Both brother David and Father John had made some good marks in the genre.  And his being joined( or joining) brothers David and Robert, along with the KEACH brothers and the QUAID brothers in THE LONG RIDERS helped seal that deal.  It's hoped by me that TCM shows that one sometime soon.

 

 

Sepiatone

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I've been enjoying the first evening of Keith Carradine introducing the westerns.

 

I just finished watching The Searchers again.

 

Fort Apache is next.

 

He kinda needs to iron the suit, BUT THE FACE IS AMAZING.

I don't think he's ever looked this good.

 

Mind you- I'm not saying he's had work done.

 

I'm saying I want the number of the guy who did it because he is good.

 

His delivery is a little stiff, but hopefully he loosened up a little bit as he went on...alls i saw was the intro for STAGECOACH; had a busy day and totally passed out for everything else. 

 

is he on tonight too?

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"Sudan" (1945)--More Technicolored nonsense from Universal, starring Maria Montez, Jon Hall, Turhan Bey, and Andy Devine.

 

Intermittently funny **** and sand nonsense, with Montez playing a queen in disguise out to avenge her father, Jon Hall as the unappreciated hero, Turhan Bey as the queen's True Love, and Andy Devine, whinnying louder than all the horses in the film, but one Great shot of him having his fingernails painted and mascara being applied sort of atones for his performance.

 

The sets are obviously fake, the jewelry looks like 1945 era Sears jewelry, horses run here, there, and everywhere, and the boulders in avalanches look like enlarged Grapenuts soaked in milk and chalk dust bounding down a cereal bowl.  I saw the film on YouTube.

 

Film is fine when Devine's off-screen.  2.6/4

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He kinda needs to iron the suit, BUT THE FACE IS AMAZING.

I don't think he's ever looked this good.

 

Mind you- I'm not saying he's had work done.

 

I'm saying I want the number of the guy who did it because he is good.

 

His delivery is a little stiff, but hopefully he loosened up a little bit as he went on...alls i saw was the intro for STAGECOACH; had a busy day and totally passed out for everything else. 

 

is he on tonight too?

 

It's the teeth, isn't it. Girls like a guy who's got all his teeth.

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I think Carradine is a good choice for the intos to Westerns.  He used to host the HISTORY CHANNEL's "Wild West Tech" series and other shows about the time period on that channel.  And being a member of the Carradine "dynasty" doesn't hurt either.  Both brother David and Father John had made some good marks in the genre.  And his being joined( or joining) brothers David and Robert, along with the KEACH brothers and the QUAID brothers in THE LONG RIDERS helped seal that deal.  It's hoped by me that TCM shows that one sometime soon.

 

 

What? No mention of the Guest brothers?

 

I'd like to see 'The Long Riders' on TCM as well. Great western.

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"The Beach Girls and the Monster" on Comet.

 

This is the last film of Jon Hall's and has some excellent surfing footage plus great beach music, not quite up to the quality of Dick Dale but close.

 

Loved the house in Brentwood that was used for interiors but glad it was not O.J.'s.

 

I forgot, I also watched "The Doctor's Dilemma" the other day, written by the inestimable G.B. Shaw and starring Leslie Caron, backed by Dirk Bogarde, Alastair Sim, Robert Morley and others. This film was amazingly acerbic, and rather denigrating toward the usually esteemed profession of medicine, taking potshots at all the practioners and their underlying motives. Specialists who were revered for their blood poisoning methods as opposed to those who thought taking out uvulas were the cat's meow, were skewered by Shaw continually. All in all, a most astute take on the hypocritical purveyors of care as opposed to the artfully non-worthy protagonist who is at their mercy as played by Bogarde. The ending in the art gallery was satisfying.

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"Night World" (1932)--Good, fast moving Pre-Code Universal gangster/speakeasy film starring Lew Ayres, Mae Clarke, and Boris Karloff. 

 

Ayres is a wealthy drunkard, Clarke is a chorus girl; they witness shootings in Happy's (Karloff) Nightclub/speakeasy.

 

Film is notable for one of Alfred Newman's early scores, and for Busby Berkeley's choreography.  Berkeley didn't yet have a whole soundstage for his musical numbers, but they definitely bear his stamp of geometric patterns and general outrageousness.

 

Film creates a world of gangsters, infidelity, wisecracks, and booze, with musical numbers topping things off.  A bit of soap opera is added, but is skated over quickly and doesn't hurt the film too much.  3.3/4.

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I finally got a hold of The Perfect Specimen last night the 1937 comedy by Michael Curtiz with Errol Flynn and Joan Blondell,from the internet,i was stunned to see a TCM logo on it,but it was a permanent one not the one we see every 20 minutes i have been with TCM for 11 years and i do not recall the movie being aired,it was probably shown between 1994 to 2000 any body can answer about the last broadcast? the film itself is not very good when you consider the cast and the director but Errol is in his physical prime and very good in this very light romantic comedy. This is my find of the year so far,last year it was Letty Lynton 1932 with Robert Montgomery and Joan Crawford

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I finally got a hold of The Perfect Specimen last night the 1937 comedy by Michael Curtiz with Errol Flynn and Joan Blondell,from the internet,i was stunned to see a TCM logo on it,but it was a permanmt one not the one we see every 20 minutes i have been with TCM for 11 years and i do not recall the movie being aired,it was probably shown between 1994 to 2000 any body can answer about the last broadcast? the film itself is not very good when you consider the cast and the director but Errol is in his physical prime and very good in this vey tlight romantic comedy. This is my find of the year so far,last year it was Letty Lynton 1932 with Robert Montgomery and Joan Crawford

I agree that the movie is kind of corny, but it's amusing. IMO, Errol is perfectly cast as "the perfect specimen." May Robson is hilarious as the grandma. I also recommend the Lux Radio version featuring Errol, Joan Blondell and Robson, it's enjoyable to listen to, especially on a long drive.

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It's the teeth, isn't it. Girls like a guy who's got all his teeth.

Yes indeed like a guy who's got all his teeth.

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He kinda needs to iron the suit, BUT THE FACE IS AMAZING.

I don't think he's ever looked this good.

 

Mind you- I'm not saying he's had work done.

 

I'm saying I want the number of the guy who did it because he is good.

 

His delivery is a little stiff, but hopefully he loosened up a little bit as he went on...alls i saw was the intro for STAGECOACH; had a busy day and totally passed out for everything else. 

 

is he on tonight too?

Yes, he is on tonight too.

 

He will be on every Tuesday and Wednesday this month.

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I saw La veuve Couderc (The Widow Couderc) (1971, Pierre Granier-Deferre), an adaptation of a Simenon novel starring Simone Signoret and Alain Delon. If the sweetness of John Ford's pastoral scenes puts you perilously close to a diabetic coma, this film is the antidote. Alain Delon is an escaped prisoner who takes shelter with Simone Signoret, a widow who lives on a small farm in the countryside out from Dijon. To say that the locals are small-minded gives them too much credit. She and her in-laws passionately hate each other. That's partly because she was a servant girl who was raped by both father and son, got pregnant by the son, married him, but lost the baby.

 

Both widow and prisoner repress most of their emotions, not that that matters when Signoret and Delon are on screen. They become lovers, not that that stops Delon for being interested in the young woman who keeps throwing herself at him.

 

The rolling hills of the French countryside have rarely looked better on screen.This provides a welcome contrast to the pettiness of the locals and the fear that the police will find Delon. Alas, there are a few period touches in the direction (zoom-ins, iris in and out, some unnecessary quick panning shots, references to a certain Arthur Penn movie), but apart from that the film is well directed. I liked it a lot, and loved the work of the stars. You get to see Delon with and without a little mustache, and shirtless several times.

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"The Deadly Companions" (1961)--Sam Peckinpah's first film, starring Brian Keith, Maureen O'Hara, and Steve Cochran.

 

Keith plays a man who's almost scalped during the Civil War, and has spent five years tracking that person down. He finds him in Gila City, and accidentally shoots a boy who gets in the way.

 

O'Hara plays the boys' mother, who despises the "respectable" women in town, and drives the body to a nearby town to be buried next to his father.  To complicate matters, Apaches are on the warpath.

 

Keith is fine as a man obsessed with vengeance, who tries to make amends for a dreadful mistake.

 

O'Hara is equally good as the boys grieving mother, who gradually comes to like Keith, in spite of everything.

 

Good, dark, atmospheric cinematography by William H. Clothier.  The theme song is sung by O'Hara over the opening and closing credits.

 

Good, underrated western should be better known.  3.2/4.

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Yes indeed like a guy who's got all his teeth.

 

Leaves me out. I played hockey, ay.

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Last night, after returning home from being with my wife's hospital bedside all day I tuned into the DECADES channel's BURKE'S LAW "binge".

 

I used to rarely miss an episode of this show back in the early '60's.  It was fun seeing it again.  I always thought it was cool that the producers managed to get so many well known Hollywood "stars" to do guest roles on the show.  If not big names, at least personalities who were familiar to the wide general public.  Last night for instance, there were episodes in which REGINALD GARDINER, PIPPA SCOTT,  ANDY DEVINE,  FERNANDO LAMAS,  CESAR ROMERO,  KEENAN WYNN,  OSKAR HOMOLKA,  AGNES MOOREHEAD,  DICK CLARK, ANDY DEVINE,  WILLIAM SHATNER,  THE SMOTHERS BROTHERS,  all had pivotal roles.  And that list was just the tip of the iceberg!

 

The suave GENE BARRY as a millionaire cop who rode to crime scenes in a Rolls Royce always seemed a hoot to me.

 I liked that show too. I really hope your wife will be better soon!

 

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Yes indeed like a guy who's got all his teeth.

Well you said a mouthful, GPF!

 

There is something about missing teeth that can ruin a romance.

 

Lack of teeth, lack of money. Gee, romance without finance is a nuisance and without teeth is just not toothsome.

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Yes indeed like a guy who's got all his teeth.

 

Well, I've got all of MY teeth!

 

Finally picked up the REST of them at my DENTIST's yesterday!  :D

 

 

Sepiatone

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"Big Friendly Giant or Unfriendly Flop for Disney?" 

 

Went to go see "The BFG" yesterday in theatres. Word of advice, don't bring kids younger than 7, since they will most likely be bored out of their minds. 

 

I went in with pretty low expectations. I remember reading the book by Roald Dahl in about 2nd or 3rd grade, and thoroughly enjoyed it. The movie was somewhat different than what I remember. I think the CGI and special effects were really fantastic, as are the norm for Disney films nowadays, but the movie was lacking something for me. Apparently, it's bombing at the box office, and I believe part of the reason this is happening is because the crowds are still flocking to see Finding Dory instead of BFG. 

 

I'm not saying I hated this movie; I'm just saying it's not worth paying the price of movie tickets for. Wait for this film to be released on DVD so you can rent it. 

 

I give it 4/10 stars. 1 because it's Disney, 2 for the special effects, and 1 for young British newcomer Ruby Barnhill, who plays Sophie. 

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"The Deadly Companions" (1961)--Sam Peckinpah's first film, starring Brian Keith, Maureen O'Hara, and Steve Cochran.

 

Keith plays a man who's almost scalped during the Civil War, and has spent five years tracking that person down. He finds him in Gila City, and accidentally shoots a boy who gets in the way.

 

O'Hara plays the boys' mother, who despises the "respectable" women in town, and drives the body to a nearby town to be buried next to his father.  To complicate matters, Apaches are on the warpath.

 

Keith is fine as a man obsessed with vengeance, who tries to make amends for a dreadful mistake.

 

O'Hara is equally good as the boys grieving mother, who gradually comes to like Keith, in spite of everything.

 

Good, dark, atmospheric cinematography by William H. Clothier.  The theme song is sung by O'Hara over the opening and closing credits.

 

Good, underrated western should be better known.  3.2/4.

Filmlover, I remember when this was shown on TCM two or three years ago, the night scene where one of the prisoners tries to attack Maureen O'Hara was so dark you could not see what was happening. Was this a problem with the print? Sounds like the print you saw was fine.

 

This film clearly shows that at this time Peckinpah's writing skills were ahead of his directing skills. Ride the High Country shows how quickly he learned.

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kingrat--the print of "The Deadly Companions" Comcast showed last night was fine--I could see what was happening--I saw this about a year ago, and the print I saw then was so dark I couldn't tell what was going on for half the movie.  TDC is definitely worth the watch If you get a clear print.

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The Spoilers (1914), starring William Farnum, with Marshall Farnum (his oldest brother) in a small role. This was the first film version, and was William Farnum’s first feature-length film. He was around 38 at the time, having spent his career on the stage. But he doesn’t look too old for the part, although in a few scenes, he appears to have a bit of a gut. Still, he is well cast as the hero, and the story follows the Rex Beach novel pretty faithfully (I read it a few weeks ago).  The print on youtube is barely acceptable. Interestingly, if you download the novel from googlebooks, it contains stills from the film, and those stills are in fairly good shape.  The story revolves around a villain trying to seize Farnum’s Alaskan gold mine.  The villain, played by Tom Santschi, is somewhat atypical. Santschi was better-looking than Farnum, and taller. Although it’s clear he is unscrupulous, he’s not the hissable type. Farnum and Santschi are at odds over the mine and a woman, so you know that at some point, somebody is gonna open up a can of whoopa**. The climactic fight scene has been written about in magazines, and was even mentioned in Farnum’s death notices. It is bizarre, to say the least. It is more like a wrestling match, with bear hugs, arm locks, etc., although a few punches are thrown. Shirts are torn. In one impressive show of strength, Santschi actually yanks Farnum off the ground and has him almost horizontally in the air for a moment. The fight lasts about 90 seconds. Several accounts of that fight have been given by Farnum, although they all seem to indicate that he and Santschi discussed the fight ahead of time and decided to really go at it. Farnum claims that the fight scene went on for five minutes more than it was supposed to, and that a lot of the fight scene was cut from the film. Some accounts say the film ran for almost two hours (it’s 98 minutes on youtube), so perhaps it was shown at slower speeds in some places, making the fight last longer. In any event, the fight does look realistic, and the actors did their own fighting.

 

This is by no means a great film, but it does have historical significance. Farnum's film career really took off, and he would eventually rake in $100,000 a year.

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"Christmas Holiday" (1944)--Fine film noir with Deanna Durbin, Gene Kelly, and Gale Sondergaard, directed by Robert Siodmak.

 

Excellent noir with Durbin not coming in till nine minutes into the film--after a stranded G.I.goes to a New Orleans nightclub and meets torch singer Jackie (Durbin), Durbin tells him her past story.

 

Durbin is very good in her role--Universal cheated the public by not letting her out of fluff roles.  The lady could sing and Act.

 

Gene Kelly is good as her husband, who has a gambling problem.  He lets the viewer see the rat buried beneath the surface charm.

 

Gale Sondergaard is good as the mother who is too attached to her son.

 

Woody Bredell's photography is effectively noirish. The film is full of Siodmak's shadow-filled photography.

 

Fine film.   3.4/4

 

A Warning--on Archivedotorg, print of CH froze in the final minute.  I easily remedied that by switching to Youtube, which has CH in parts, and viewed the final minute there.

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"Christmas Holiday" (1944)--Fine film noir with Deanna Durbin, Gene Kelly, and Gale Sondergaard, directed by Robert Siodmak.

 

Excellent noir with Durbin not coming in till nine minutes into the film--after a stranded G.I.goes to a New Orleans nightclub and meets torch singer Jackie (Durbin), Durbin tells him her past story.

 

Durbin is very good in her role--Universal cheated the public by not letting her out of fluff roles.  The lady could sing and Act.

 

Gene Kelly is good as her husband, who has a gambling problem.  He lets the viewer see the rat buried beneath the surface charm.

 

Gale Sondergaard is good as the mother who is too attached to her son.

 

Woody Bredell's photography is effectively noirish. The film is full of Siodmak's shadow-filled photography.

 

Fine film.   3.4/4

 

A Warning--on Archivedotorg, print of CH froze in the final minute.  I easily remedied that by switching to Youtube, which has CH in parts, and viewed the final minute there.

Great review, FL! Love this film and supposedly after playing this rat, not unlike Pal Joey, good old Gene tried to never show that side of his acting again, which is sad.

 

The film is wonderful, but after seeing it I bought the book by Maugham and have to say that it is even more profoundly moving, getting a bit deeper into Somerset's take on auto-martyrdom and such.

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