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"Son of Frankenstein" (1939)--Starring Boris Karloff, Basil Rathbone, and Bela Lugosi.

 

Film is the third, last and least of the Karloff Frankenstein movies.  The grandson of Dr. Frankenstein, his wife and son move into the village that's overshadowed by the Family castle.  The village in the past 100 years has gone from a prosperous place to being a shunned town.  Despite the Monster being dead, there is still the occasional murder committed in the village.

 

Karloff is the best actor in the film.  He was the only one of the many who played that role who made Frankenstein's Monster an affecting character.

 

Bela Lugosi is entertaining as the villainous Ygor, who wants revenge on all who have wronged him.

 

Basil Rathbone is good in the first two thirds of the film, then his performance falls apart when he's trying to pretend everything's all right (it's Not) in the last twenty minutes. I can only blame the director, Rowland V. Lee, for that.  Rathbone is usually so polished, even when things are going wrong.

 

I believe Rathbone played Dr. Frankenstein's son, not grandson.

And let me put in a plug for Lionel Atwill, whose great performance was spoofed so well by Kenneth Mars in Young Frankenstein.

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West Point Story (1950).

 

This was an average musical starring James Cagney, Virginia Mayo and Doris Day.  It features Cagney as a washed up Broadway producer and choreographer who now makes a living putting on shows in rundown clubs and betting on horses.  His girlfriend, Mayo, encourages him to figure out a way out of his situation before it's too late and he's permanently unemployable.  He ends up being offered an opportunity by a rival producer, Roland Winters, to direct a show at West Point Military Academy that was written by Winters' nephew, Gordon MacRae.  Winters seems to think that this show will be a hit, and he wants Cagney to convince MacRae to leave West Point to pursue a career on Broadway.  MacRae, however, is dedicated to the military and does not want to leave. 

 

Cagney and Winters seem to have a mutual dislike for one another throughout the film.  This is explained in a bit of backstory which also involves Day.  It seems that back in the day, Day was buried in the back of the chorus in one of Winters' shows.  Cagney, upset that Day's talents were being ignored and misused, secretly helped Day secure a Hollywood contract.  In retaliation, Winters fired Cagney and had him blackballed so that he would be unable to get another job on Broadway.  This incident is what led to Cagney working in the rundown club.  Cagney does not want to accept Winters' proposition, but does so, because he's afraid that Mayo will leave him.  I'm not exactly sure why Winters put aside his dislike of Cagney to offer him this opportunity.  Perhaps he was desperate to get his nephew out of West Point.

 

At some point, Cagney gets himself into trouble and is barred from re-entering the school.  However, West Point does let him back in if he enrolls as a cadet.  I don't really know why this little plot line needed to be added into the film.  It didn't really add to the plot.  After Cagney enrolls and gets the pre-requisite crew cut, he's back to rehearsing for the show.  It was almost as if this was written as an excuse to have a scene showing Cagney getting his head shaved.  

 

Cagney continues working on MacRae to convince him to leave the school, but he refuses.  He calls Day and asks her if she'd do him a favor by accompanying MacRae to the upcoming dance.  She agrees, because she feels indebted to Cagney for her career.  Cagney ends up convincing Day to also appear in the show as he feels that her professional experience will give MacRae a taste of what show business was like.  Cagney's other tactic is to try and make Day and MacRae fall in love so that MacRae will want to leave West Point to follow Day.  The plan succeeds, but then complications ensue.

 

---

 

Overall, I thought this film was entertaining, however, I couldn't help but feel that it would have been enhanced with Technicolor.  I don't normally feel like black and white films are "missing something" without color, but for whatever reason, I felt that Technicolor would have made this film "pop" more.  I thought Cagney was excellent and I loved his hoofing scenes.  I wish that he'd have had more opportunities to appear in musicals.  Mayo was very good as the frustrated, but supportive girlfriend, and I thought she looked very pretty in this movie as well.  Day was excellent as usual and I love her singing.  I love her style, it's very jazzy and full of emotion.  Imo, she's comparable to Rosemary Clooney.  MacRae was fine, but I don't care for his singing (not that it's bad, it's just not my taste).  Compared to Cagney and Day, MacRae wasn't exceptional, but he wasn't bad either.  He was serviceable as the cadet in love with Day.  

 

Alan Hale Jr. aka "The Skipper" on Gilligan's Island has a small role in this film as one of the cadets.  He's significantly younger and a little thinner than when he was shipwrecked on the island, but his voice is obvious as soon as you hear him speak.  He also has a scene at the end of the film where he appears in drag, supposedly impersonating Doris Day.  

 

This was a decent musical, not the best I've seen and not the worst.  But it was entertaining and a good way to pass a couple of hours.

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Elopement (1951)

Pleasant little surprise, with Clifton Webb and Charles Bickford playing the fathers of two children (Anne Francis and William Lundigan, respectively), who plan to elope.  When Webb discovers his daughter is missing, he runs around the neighborhood in his pajamas (but manages to wear a hat), is assaulted by dogs, and is picked up by the police as a prowler. He arrives home just in time to take a call from a nosy neighbor warning him that there is a prowler in the neighborhood.

 

This is Webb’s film all the way, with a few dull interludes featuring Francis and Lundigan. Webb and Bickford, along with their wives, Bickford’s youngest kid (Tommy Rettig) and Francis’ godfather (Reginald Gardner) all end up in Webb’s car, in pursuit of the couple. Along the way, Webb steals Rettig’s sandwich, throws Bickford’s pipe out the car window, and, when Rettig  acts up, yells “can someone control that little ba … barbarian??” Webb and Bickford get to slap each other. Francis and Lundigan call off the wedding, then end up eloping again. Everyone ends up happy. In the fade-out, Webb tells Bickford all about Francis’ engineering talents, then states she will probably have lots of children, because her favorite film is “Cheaper By The Dozen.” Coincidentally, I had just watched that film two days earlier.

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Geez SCSU, you coulda also posted this in the "Movie referrences" thread.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Geez SCSU, you coulda also posted this in the "Movie referrences" thread.

 

 

Sepiatone

Well, for that matter, there is probably an "I Love Clifton Webb" thread on here somewhere, or "Best Onscreen Slaps."

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Under the Volcano (1984).

 

Albert Finney plays the alcoholic former British Consul to Mexico in 1938. His brother (Anthony Andrews) has given up fighting the Spanish Civil War, presumably to help take care of Finney. And then Finney's estranged wife (Jacqueline Bisset) shows up.

 

That's about it to the movie, as it's a character study of the Finney character's alcoholism. He's a thoroughly unpleasant character in every way.

 

Everybody does a good job acting, and there's some nice cinematography. Finney's alcoholism is probably more realistic than anything else put on screen before (especially The Lost Weekend and likely Days of Wine and Roses too). But I found the ending unsatisfying, and the movie as a whole wasn't what I was expecting. (For some reason I had the impression that the literal volcano was going to be under risk of eruption, as in The Devil at 4 O'Clock.)

 

If you know what you're getting into and it's your sort of thing, the movie is probably a 9/10. But it wasn't quite my thing, so I'll give it a 7/10.

 

The novel was very difficult, I couldn't get through it. But I don't feel so bad about that, especially after reading a review of the movie by Pauline Kael who mentions the novel and says, "I couldn't get through it."

 

(...not that it was bad, rather that is was ambiguous and non-engaging)

 

-

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LOL

 

Yep, the old dude with the eyepatch was certainly proud of his Irish heritage, wasn't he?!!!

 

(...and which reminds me of the old joke..."Did you hear Continental Airlines is going to merge with Aer Lingus? And the new name of these combined airlines is going to be..."...well, I think you can guess the punchline here, right Vautrin ol' boy?!) ;)

The ground was so overrun with Irishmen that poor Henry couldn't

keep his O's straight. I like the look of the one recruit who looked

like he just got off the stagecoach from NYC.

 

Naughty, naughty. I'd love to see the ad campaign for that airline.

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"Roller Boogie" (1979)--I missed this Sat. night, so I checked YouTube for the film.  YT had the movie.

 

Film follows the Mickey-Judy formula, except people dance on roller skates where the M-J films would have had a song and dance routine.

 

Linda Blairs' parents are Rich and bored and don't try to Understand their daughter.  Jim Bray is a working class boy with two jobs. A Complication is thrown into the plot, as in the M-J movies; here, it is the threat of arson to get rid of the skating rink for a shopping mall.  Film is all about roller skating; nobody bursts into song while they skate.  

 

Beverly Garland can keep her dignity in anything.  Linda Blair is a reasonably competent skater.  Aside from them, it seems unfair to mention acting.  There are maybe thirty actors listed in the credits; there are 60-90 people billed as "skaters" or "stunt skaters".

 

Film is somewhat amusing, predictable relic of the "roller disco" fad with bits and pieces of interesting dancing (watch for the breakdancers on skates).  An ok time passer.  2.2/4

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Aside from them, it seems unfair to mention acting.

 

:lol: 

Too good a line to just "like"the post.

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I saw an episode of "Columbo", with Jack Cassidy killing his writing partner, Martin Milner. Not bad, but that's not why I'm bringing it up. I looked at the ending credits, and, circa 1972, it was written by Steven Bochco and directed by Steven Spielberg. Certainly a precursor of things to come.

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I saw an episode of "Columbo", with Jack Cassidy killing his writing partner, Martin Milner. Not bad, but that's not why I'm bringing it up. I looked at the ending credits, and, circa 1972, it was written by Steven Bochco and directed by Steven Spielberg. Certainly a precursor of things to come.

 

Oh my God!

That's how Martin Milner died?!?!

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Beverly Garland can keep her dignity in anything. 

 

It came from her working for Corman on more than one occasion.

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I watched IT ALWAYS RAINS ON SUNDAY (1947) [british Title: OI! WHY THE 'ELLS IT RAININ ON SUNDY AGIN?!] last night.

 

that magic thing happened where i was only paying casual attention at the beginning, but soon the film won me over and i was rapt til' the end.

 

a very good movie, splendidly acted and shot, and one that deserves a lot more credit than it gets for initiating the "kitchen sink" trend of British cinema (watching it, you can practically hear the seeds for the following year's ODD MAN OUT as well as SATURDAY NIGHT AND SUNDAY MORNING, ROOM AT THE TOP and EASTENDERS formenting.)

 

ironic that it was an Ealing film, because as I watched it, I could not help but imagine how the film would've turned out had the makers decided to make it an out-and-out comedy (it has laugh out loud moments nonetheless.)

 

up until the Brexit thing, we in America were so often under the mistaken impression that across the pond, things are all "elevensies with the Vicar" and floral prints and Jane Austen sipping tea- no, lemme tell you: BRITAIN HAS A LOT OF TRASH, and I love films that wallow in the deliciously dirty "lower" strata of Britainia

 

loved the slang, loved the photography, a lot of the shots were just plain perfectly set-up (esp. the crowd scenes)- I was even fine with the fact that the movie kinda switches gears at the end and decides to become a hardcore noir in the final (extremely well-shot and edited) 10 minutes.

 

Googie Withers takes acting honors, but everyone is great. The guy who she ended up marrying in real life after filming was schmoklng hot., so way to go, Googie- who needs the BAFTA when he's your take-home prize?

 

Would LOVE to see a spotlight cast on British films of the immediate Postwar era.

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Okay 2 things:

 

1. Welcome to the message boards, very nice write-up.

 

2. Your avatar and username are FAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAABULouS!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Thank you, Lorna, for the welcome and kind words!

 

Your username and avatar and pretty awesome as well.  Gotta love Joan!

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"Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves" (1944)--Technicolored Arabian Nights fluff, courtesy of Universal.  Starring Maria Montez, the dependably dim Jon Hall, Turhan Bey, & Andy Devine.

 

The plot: Amara (Yvette Duguay) and Ali (Scotty Beckett) exchange blood as children, to symbolize their love.  They are separated, and Alis' father, Caliph of Baghdad, is murdered.  Ali gets away, finds the Forty Thieves' lair, and falls asleep.  He is discovered, but allowed to live.  Ten years go by.  Ali (Hall) finds Amara (Montez) bathing.  The delirious plot goes from there, making brief stops in the land of operetta and mischoreographed musical numbers.

 

The person in charge of Technicolor went wild in this film.  Peoples clothes are color coordinated with their surroundings (the escaped prince is wearing pink and white--the boulders surrounding him are white and pink, etc).  There is one main castle--it changes color depending on whether it's day or night, and according  to what colors Montez is wearing.  The insides of  the castle change color from shot to shot, from green to beige to pink.  William Fritzsche, Universal's  Associate Technicolor consultant, created a dream world where the sky can be green (literally) and anything can happen.

 

The actors' looks are more important than their performances.  Jon Hall is predictably heroic and dim.  Maria Montez is drop dead gorgeous; her accent is thicker than usual, and she rolls her r's for some reason, making it hard to guess what some of her lines are.  Turhan Bey is good in a bad guy/good guy role.  Andy Devine has a relatively small role, so he doesn't do much damage.

 

I saw a brand new print of this on Another site.  This one is really worth searching out.  The colors jumped off the screen. It was subtitled in some Asian language, but spoken in English.  Film is blissfully silly romp.  3.6/4

 

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"Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves" (1944)--Technicolored Arabian Nights fluff, courtesy of Universal.  Starring Maria Montez, the dependably dim Jon Hall, Turhan Bey, & Andy Devine.

 

This was one of my favorite films as a kid; I don't think I've seen it in over 40 years. Kurt Katch makes a great villain.

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...I saw a brand new print of this on Another site.  This one is really worth searching out.  The colors jumped off the screen. It was subtitled in some Asian language, but spoken in English.  Film is blissfully silly romp.  3.6/4

 

Oh sure, Rich!

 

Like I don't see enough Korean spam around THIS place already!!!

 

(...got any OTHER suggestions here, dude?!!!)

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it seems like one of the ways that some prints wiggle around copyright issues on youtube is to post versions with foreign language subtitles, which really I'm fine with. It's helped me brush up on my Portuguese a few times.

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Oh sure, Rich!

 

Like I don't see enough Korean spam around THIS place already!!!

 

(...got any OTHER suggestions here, dude?!!!)

Hey, I didn't post the review. You are laboring under a misdemeanor.

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Hey, I didn't post the review. You are laboring under a misdemeanor.

 

OOPS!!!

 

I meant "film lover", of course.

 

(...still kind'a funny though, wouldn't ya say?!...well, at least Lorna liked it anyway)

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it seems like one of the ways that some prints wiggle around copyright issues on youtube is to post versions with foreign language subtitles, which really I'm fine with. It's helped me brush up on my Portuguese a few times.

or French, in From Hell It Came

 

Untitled5-92.png

 

Loosely translated, she is saying "****, your **** is mine!"

Edited by TCMModerator1
Edited for Language
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scsu1975, Dargo--I saw the print on Archive.org, and I Think the subtitles were Vietnamese--they weren't the Korean spam we see too often.

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scsu1975, Dargo--I saw the print on Archive.org, and I Think the subtitles were Vietnamese--they weren't the Korean spam we see too often.

 

OH! Like THAT'S supposed to be BETTER somehow, FL???!!!

 

Ya see, ever since I watched THE DEER HUNTER years ago, and specifically that scene with Walken playin' Russian Roulette, every time I hear or even SEE Vietnamese lettering now I get this weird kind'a flashback and go into these PTSD/Munchausen by proxy convolutions!

 

(...and my doctor says that ain't good for me)

 

;)

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