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I Just Watched...

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scsu1975, Dargo--I saw the print on Archive.org, and I Think the subtitles were Vietnamese--they weren't the Korean spam we see too often.

Thanks, I just located it and the print looks great. Not sure how it ended up at archive.org; I thought that was a public domain site.

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This was one of my favorite films as a kid; I don't think I've seen it in over 40 years. 

 

...one year for every thief.

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In This Our Life on Friday made a particular impression on me, in the midst of all the coverage of the police shootings of black males and the subsequent Dallas shootings.  The storyline about the young black man who ends up "on the hook" for the selfish sister's hit and run was surprisingly ahead of its time.  The more things change, the more they stay the same....

 

Also, I think Olivia's performance is terrific -- strong, understated, and filled with integrity.  This is no "goody two shoes" sister -- she has class and guts.  Bette Davis' performance by modern standards, seems over-the-top.  The film's weakness -- George Brent.  I'd swear he looks old enough to be Oliva's father (and maybe he was!).  It's hard to believe the middle-aged man with shoe-black on his hair is an idealistic, "radical" lawyer.  Henry Fonda or Jimmy Stewart would be better for that part.  Even Robert Cummings or Jeffrey Lynn (while not a strong presence, but he played that type in The Roaring 20s) would have been a better choice.  I guess Warner's figured it's a Bette Davis picture, so let's use George again.

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In This Our Life on Friday made a particular impression on me, in the midst of all the coverage of the police shootings of black males and the subsequent Dallas shootings.  The storyline about the young black man who ends up "on the hook" for the selfish sister's hit and run was surprisingly ahead of its time.  The more things change, the more they stay the same....

 

Also, I think Olivia's performance is terrific -- strong, understated, and filled with integrity.  This is no "goody two shoes" sister -- she has class and guts.  Bette Davis' performance by modern standards, seems over-the-top.  The film's weakness -- George Brent.  I'd swear he looks old enough to be Oliva's father (and maybe he was!).  It's hard to believe the middle-aged man with shoe-black on his hair is an idealistic, "radical" lawyer.  Henry Fonda or Jimmy Stewart would be better for that part.  Even Robert Cummings or Jeffrey Lynn (while not a strong presence, but he played that type in The Roaring 20s) would have been a better choice.  I guess Warner's figured it's a Bette Davis picture, so let's use George again.

 

Bette Davis' performance by any standard was over-the-top but she was miscast.   The part called for a women in her early 20s.   Still in many ways it worked since the character was someone over the top as well.     Olivia gave the best performance in the film.   Too bad some of her scenes were cut back after Davis complained that Huston was way too focused on Olivia.   

 

Clearly Brent is the weak link.    At least we have Charles Coburn as the relative just a little too interested in Stanley.  

 

As it relates to the young black character;   I was watching the Match Game on Decades and a black women contestant was named Stanley.    Gene the host asked her how she got that usual name and she mentioned that her mom got it from a Bette Davis movie.  She didn't mention why,  but I assume those jailhouse scenes had an impact on her mom.  

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Hey, I didn't post the review. You are laboring under a misdemeanor.

 

I operate under misdemeanors quite often but I recover by exalterating myself in the search of the truant.

 

:blink:

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I just saw EXECUTIVE ACTION which I recorded during Robert Ryan month. Interesting premise and use of real and unreal footage. Although I think Oswald acted alone,the movie does give you pause for doubt. One of the shooters had long sideburns which were not in style in 1963 but were when the movie was made so this took me out of the picture a little. I had forgotten about all the witnesses who died (natural and unnatural causes) over a short period of time after Kennedy was killed and the odds of that happening extremely high. I enjoyed seeing Robert and Burt Lancaster together - two great actors who I like watching in almost anything.

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Lorna said: Would LOVE to see a spotlight cast on British films of the immediate Postwar era.

 

Agree 100%

 

All those Ealing Studio movies with Alec Guinness and the Lean movies of the time have a certain "feel" to them that I can't quite put my finger on. Many involve scenes with bombed out London in the back ground, but even interior movies of the time have a different feel to them. Like a dignified sadness of surviving a war on their own soil.

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I just saw EXECUTIVE ACTION which I recorded during Robert Ryan month. Interesting premise and use of real and unreal footage. Although I think Oswald acted alone,the movie does give you pause for doubt. One of the shooters had long sideburns which were not in style in 1963 but were when the movie was made so this took me out of the picture a little. I had forgotten about all the witnesses who died (natural and unnatural causes) over a short period of time after Kennedy was killed and the odds of that happening extremely high. I enjoyed seeing Robert and Burt Lancaster together - two great actors who I like watching in almost anything.

 

I never saw the movie, so I don't know HOW "long" the sideburns you mentioned were, or who in the movie sported them or the character's role in it.

 

But, ever since ELVIS hit the scene, sideburns of a wide variety of styles and lengths were seen all over the place.

 

I was 12 in 1963, and recall seeing all sorts of "older" boys having some pretty bodacious sideburns at th time.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Lorna said: Would LOVE to see a spotlight cast on British films of the immediate Postwar era.

 

Agree 100%

 

All those Ealing Studio movies with Alec Guinness and the Lean movies of the time have a certain "feel" to them that I can't quite put my finger on. Many involve scenes with bombed out London in the back ground, but even interior movies of the time have a different feel to them. Like a dignified sadness of surviving a war on their own soil.

 

This got me thinking of British comedies of the 50s produced by the Rank Organizations (Ealing Studios?). A common pool of actors were often associated with some of these. Dirk Bogarde, for one. I remember seeing some of these all the way back there when they came out. They must  have been shown at some theater or perhaps they made a round of TV showings, not quite sure how it came about that I was able to see them. They seemed pretty funny.

 

There was one in particular that have often wondered about and would like to see again. It was about a group of musicians attending a music school, a comedy. All I know about it is that it was done by the Rank Organization and that it had Joan Sims in it. I remember too a tall, lanky actor, conceited as hell, who preened about bragging about his new sonata. I don't think he was much liked. I clicked on everyone of Joan Sims films during that era and could not find it. I sure would like to know it.

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or French, in From Hell It Came

 

Untitled5-92.png

 

Loosely translated, she is saying "****, your **** is mine!"

 

Which is a phrase WE SHOULD ALL know in AS MANY LANGUAGES AS POSSIBLE.

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I love Three Days of the Condor.

 

I love political thrillers.

Hi, GPF!

 

Just curious, do you like "All The President's Men"?

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I only like half of them.

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Six Pack (1982); starring Kenny Rogers, young Anthony Michael Hall, and 17-year-old Diane Lane. This one is about race-car driver Brewster Baker trying to get back in the game (Rogers), who stumbles upon Heather AKA Breezy (Lane) and her 5 younger brothers after they strip his car for parts. Brewster runs into the kids several times before realizing they could all be mutually beneficial to each other. Ladies man Brewster becomes not so much of a ladies man, and more of a one-lady man after getting used to having the kids around. I give it 3 stars out of 10. 1 for adorable Diane Lane, 1 for Anthony Michael Hall, and one for the rest of the kids. 

 

Frankenweenie (2012): clay-mation film directed by Tim Burton starring Catherine O'Hara, Martin Short, Winona Ryder, and cameo of Christopher Lee as Dracula on the protagonist's parents' television set. 

Young Victor and his dog, Sparky, are inseparable, and his parents worry about his not having actual friends. Eventually, Sparky dies after an accident, and Victor assumes a constant state of mourning and borderline depression until his new science teacher inspires him to bring Sparky back to life for his science project. Victor manages to accomplish this feat, and then attempts to hide his re-born dog from the rest of the neighborhood. Eventually, the other boys at school fraternize with death, which results in the obvious consequences. I give this movie 2 for Catherine O'Hara playing 3 characters, 1 for Winona Ryder being cast as a 12 year old girl, 1 for Tim Burton, and 1 for Disney being brave enough to tempt fate/play with fire and manage not to get burned. 

 

 

 

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Six Pack (1982); starring Kenny Rogers, young Anthony Michael Hall, and 17-year-old Diane Lane. This one is about race-car driver Brewster Baker trying to get back in the game (Rogers), who stumbles upon Heather AKA Breezy (Lane) and her 5 younger brothers after they strip his car for parts. Brewster runs into the kids several times before realizing they could all be mutually beneficial to each other. Ladies man Brewster becomes not so much of a ladies man, and more of a one-lady man after getting used to having the kids around. I give it 3 stars out of 10. 1 for adorable Diane Lane, 1 for Anthony Michael Hall, and one for the rest of the kids. 

 

...

 

 

I'll watch anything with Diane Lane in it,

even a (I can't believe I'm saying this... but ..) Liberty Mutual commercial.. [puhTOOhey!]

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I'll watch anything with Diane Lane in it,

even a (I can't believe I'm saying this... but ..) Liberty Mutual commercial.. [puhTOOhey!]

 

Have you seen Ladies and Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains? That was a good one.

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Frankenweenie (2012): clay-mation film directed by Tim Burton starring Catherine O'Hara, Martin Short, Winona Ryder, and cameo of Christopher Lee as Dracula on the protagonist's parents' television set. 

Young Victor and his dog, Sparky, are inseparable, and his parents worry about his not having actual friends. Eventually, Sparky dies after an accident, and Victor assumes a constant state of mourning and borderline depression until his new science teacher inspires him to bring Sparky back to life for his science project. Victor manages to accomplish this feat, and then attempts to hide his re-born dog from the rest of the neighborhood. Eventually, the other boys at school fraternize with death, which results in the obvious consequences. I give this movie 2 for Catherine O'Hara playing 3 characters, 1 for Winona Ryder being cast as a 12 year old girl, 1 for Tim Burton, and 1 for Disney being brave enough to tempt fate/play with fire and manage not to get burned. 

 

Have you seen the live action FRANKENWEENIE short that Tim Butron made prior to the 2012 stop-motion animated feature?

I like the short a lot. 

It aired on TCM as one of the Treasures from the Disney Vault and I'm pretty sure that it used to air on Disney Channel around Halloween.

The short was made 28 years before the stop-motion feature, and Disney fired Tim Burton after they saw the completed short. Disney had wanted to show the short theatrically before a 1984 re-release of PINOCCHIO, but they felt that it was unsuitable for a young audience and that Burton had wasted Disney resources making it. The short was first released on DVD as an extra on the "Special Edition" release of THE NIGHTMARE BEFORE CHRISTMAS and was also included as a bonus feature on the DVD release of the FRANKENWEENIE stop-motion feature. 

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The short was first released on video as an extra on the "Special Edition" DVD release of  THE NIGHTMARE BEFORE CHRISTMAS and was also included as a bonus feature on the DVD release of the FRANKENWEENIE stop-motion feature. 

 

It was released as a stand-alone VHS in the 1980's. It used to show up for sale every Halloween season in your Wal-Mart/K-Mart/Target type establishments, and it was in video rental stores.

 

761c7d872fe27e4018fae2e53b267b81.jpg

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It was released as a stand-alone VHS in the 1980's. It used to show up for sale every Halloween season in your Wal-Mart/K-Mart/Target type establishments, and it was in video rental stores.

 

761c7d872fe27e4018fae2e53b267b81.jpg

 

Thanks, Lawrence, for this information.

 

I have updated my post to read: "The short was first released on DVD as an extra on the "Special Edition" release of THE NIGHTMARE BEFORE CHRISTMAS."

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Thanks, Lawrence, for this information.

 

I have updated my post to read: "The short was first released on DVD as an extra on the "Special Edition"  release of  THE NIGHTMARE BEFORE CHRISTMAS."

 

That's fine. I wasn't trying to discredit you, but rather to point out that it was readily available for a long time, and Disney milked it for all that it was worth even before the advent of DVD. I remember more than a few angry customers returning the tape to complain about how short it was, despite the full price tag to buy/rent it.

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That's fine. I wasn't trying to discredit you, but rather to point out that it was readily available for a long time, and Disney milked it for all that it was worth even before the advent of DVD. I remember more than a few angry customers returning the tape to complain about how short it was, despite the full price tag to buy/rent it.

 

It's interesting that on the image of the VHS you posted the film is described as  "A Hilarious Comedy From Disney" especially considering Disney's original reaction to the short. 

I guess Disney was trying to recoup those "wasted resources."

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I can't resist a good romance film now and then. A friend of mine who loves British films told me about a great human interest film from '56 called Now and Forever with Janette Scott and Vernon Gray. It is truly a great love story of a beautiful 17 year old girl from a wealthy family who falls in love with an auto mechanic. Her parents are divorced and her selfish mother (ably played by Pamela Brown) wants to keep the lovers apart, so the next step may have been a drastic one on the girl's part. Ultimately, the two plan an elopement. I was able to see this on Amazon Prime last night and was very touched. The beautiful on location scenes in rural England are truly superb and the acting is very realistic and poignant. I enjoyed the film from start to finish and though it was predictable, found it a worthwhile viewing. Some of the home decor was very beautiful as well. I wonder what they do with lovely scenery and draperies, etc. following a film. I would love to have the drapes and the decor of the girl's lovely bedroom!

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Have you seen Ladies and Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains? That was a good one.

 

Not that I can recall, but I see also that Robert Donat's nephew has the lead in this film. Another interesting link to the past.

 

Diane was very young and very beautiful in this movie... she didn't even appear on my radar until she had grown up a bit. 

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Pool Of London (1951) Nautical Noir

 

 

POL%2BPoster.jpg

 

Directed by Basil Dearden, excellent cinematography by Gordon Dines. The film stars Bonar Colleano, Earl Cameron, Susan Shaw, Renée Asherson, Moira Lister, Max Adrian, Charlie Vernon, Joan Dowling, James Robertson Justice, Michael Golden, Alfie Bass, Christopher Hewett Christopher, and Leslie Phillips.

 

Tow sailor buds get mixed up smuggling and murder.

 

Pool of London rivals Night And The City (1950) cinematically. If you need a Noir visual fix this film will not disappoint. 7/10

 

Full review  in Film Noir/Gangster board and with more screencaps here:http://noirsville.blogspot.com/2016/07/pool-of-london-1951-nautical-noir.html

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Pool Of London (1951) Nautical Noir

 

 

POL%2BPoster.jpg

 

Directed by Basil Dearden, excellent cinematography by Gordon Dines. The film stars Bonar Colleano, Earl Cameron, Susan Shaw, Renée Asherson, Moira Lister, Max Adrian, Charlie Vernon, Joan Dowling, James Robertson Justice, Michael Golden, Alfie Bass, Christopher Hewett Christopher, and Leslie Phillips.

 

Tow sailor buds get mixed up smuggling and murder.

 

Pool of London rivals Night And The City (1950) cinematically. If you need a Noir visual fix this film will not disappoint. 7/10

 

Full review  in Film Noir/Gangster board and with more screencaps here:http://noirsville.blogspot.com/2016/07/pool-of-london-1951-nautical-noir.html

I like Gangster film noir too and will look this one up. I do like Night and the City.

Thanks!

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I never saw the movie, so I don't know HOW "long" the sideburns you mentioned were, or who in the movie sported them or the character's role in it.

 

But, ever since ELVIS hit the scene, sideburns of a wide variety of styles and lengths were seen all over the place.

 

I was 12 in 1963, and recall seeing all sorts of "older" boys having some pretty bodacious sideburns at th time.

 

 

Sepiatone,

I was 11 in 1963 and I don't recall long sideburns much in real or reel life. Maybe it depended on where we grew up. Elvis did have sideburns, you are right, when he first came on the scene in the 1950s and later in his career ala his "comeback" special and his Vegas days. I think he cut them back in the early 1960s judging from his movies during that time frame. Whatever, I still think that dude's sideburns in EXECUTIVE ACTION were kinda long for 1963. To me, the longer hair/sideburns for most guys came into being with the British Invasion rock groups circa 1964/1965.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

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