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What is a smart aleck?

 

You RANG???

 

(...love the present discussion here, btw...and, ah, yeah, MissW and James are right here in my book...Astaire WAS sometimes a "smart aleck" in his movies, BUT he was always so charming and soft-spoken while being one, ya gotta still love the guy anyway...and UNLIKE a certain OTHER guy I know...and who types in that infuriating uppercase letters whenever HE wants ya to imagine the inflection in his voice while you read HIS attempts at punchlines!)

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"Veiled Aristocrats" (1932) that had me noticing something, the program description is a black passing as white. About his hair,  wouldn't people in the city took notice?  

 

veiled-aristocrats-poster.jpg

 

Nah, they just figured he was Sheldon Leonard.

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"Rogue of the Rio Grande" (1930)--Cheap quickie western from Atlantic Films is notable only for Myrna Loy's appearance and singing and dancing.  She has two songs; the first sounds remarkably like her speaking voice.  Assuming that's her voice, she had a listenable but weak soprano voice.  The second song, the voice is noticeably stronger and hits higher notes.

 

Loy was also coached by Eduardo Cansino (Rita Hayworth's father) for the dance routines in the film.

 

Anachronisms abound.  Along with stagecoaches, film features platinum dyed blondes, the best (worst?) of 1929 flapper fashions, people writing checks, etc.

 

Saw on archive dot org. For Loy completists only. 1.5/4.

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"Rogue of the Rio Grande" (1930)--Cheap quickie western from Atlantic Films is notable only for Myrna Loy's appearance and singing and dancing.  She has two songs; the first sounds remarkably like her speaking voice.  Assuming that's her voice, she had a listenable but weak soprano voice.  The second song, the voice is noticeably stronger and hits higher notes.

 

Loy was also coached by Eduardo Cansino (Rita Hayworth's father) for the dance routines in the film.

 

Anachronisms abound.  Along with stagecoaches, film features platinum dyed blondes, the best (worst?) of 1929 flapper fashions, people writing checks, etc.

 

Saw on archive dot org. For Loy completists only. 1.5/4.

 

 

MyrnaRioGrande01.jpg

 

myrnariogrande07.jpg

 

I luv this'n. I posted fairly elaborately on this years ago complete with caps and the usual laffite humor (which has quite often gone unappreciated---today is my day of lament.) It was during a pre-Like era and it was to my astonishment that nary a poster even responded to it. I was so disillusioned (which happens to me quite often, wah!)

 

You're right 293, not a legend but then not bad for 1930. Rather than subjecting it to the rigors of critical analysis* I feel that glimpsing Loy in an early one with a nascent attempt at Western adds up for me as a charming curio. A must for a loyal Loy fan.

 

*...since I don't really know how to write a formal review anyway, not like you and others who do it so well. For me I like it or I dun't.

 

myrnariogrande05.jpg

 

I remember trying to tell whether or not she was sitting on the horse, either conventionally of side saddle, or whether she was just standing beside the horse. I believe the movie wanted us to believe that she was amount (a word?) It was a short scene at the end and was basically a still. The idea that she was afraid of horses and didn't want to actually mount is the point.

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lafitte--Thanks for including me in the compliment about others reviewing skills.  

 

Reviewing is easy.  Just put down a short version of the films' credits, then your impression of the film overall, then a bit about the lead performances.   Then whatever made an impression (good or bad) on you.

 

Loy IS charming in "Rogue of the Rio Grande"; the rest of the cast, not so much.

 

Still, I was too hard on it.  For Loy's dancing and singing (I'm fairly certain that was her own voice in the first number),  2/4--all for Loy.

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I watched SHANE last night and found myself turned off (again) by the too-dark, hard to see night scenes...but i found myself utterly beguiled by THE OX-BOW INCIDENT, which came on afterwards- watched the whole thing with rapt attention.

 

it seemed to blow by in no time- it felt more like it was almost an hour long, i went to imdb to try and find the run time, but they re-formatted the information on the site a while back to make it "easier and more user-friendly" and I'm ****ed if I know how to find anything besides the cast list and trivia.

 

just a powerful and unusual film for a lot of reasons- a revelation on lots of fronts: that such a story could be told at the time, that it still resonates the way it does, that the lead actor plays a passive character- really fading in to the ensemble in a way that John Wayne or (original choice until someone thankfully came to their senses) Gary Cooper would NEVER have done. That it was directed simply and efficiently and without a lot of grandiosity or constant and overt moralizing** by William Wellman, that there are only three women in the film and each is portrayed uniquely. That there are no STARS- and not even a lot of really well known character actors (exceptions like Harry Davenport and Jane Darwell- in the only good role she ever got after winning an Oscar- notwithstanding.)

 

just a great piece of filmmaking- in spite of what I'm sure were daunting odds from Zanuck, the production code and all sorts of other factors.

 

 

** although there is some speechifyin' and didactic nature to the scenes, but it's okay. it's waaaaaaaaaaaay subtler than it would've been in the hands of lesser filmmakers.

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LornaHansonForbes--The running time of TOBI is 75 minutes: on imdb, the running time is just below the last word of the title.

 

AHA!

 

Thanks. It seemed short...I think it's safe to say that they added the (debateably) unnecessary subplot with Mary Beth Hughes to stretch the run-time.

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Paris, Texas (1984) Lost And Found And Lost Again

 

Paris%252C%2BTexas%2BCannes%2BPoster.jpg

 

Directed by Wim Wenders (The American Friend (1977)) and written by L.M. Kit Carson and playwright Sam Shepard. It has an immersive and quite distinctive score composed by Ry Cooder. The beautiful cinematography was by Robby Müller (The American Friend (1977)).

 

Peep%2Bbooth%2Bpart%2B2%2B01%2BParis%252

 

If you haven't seen this see it now. The film contains one of the great monologues in cinema history. 10/10

 

Fuller review with screencaps from the Criterion DVD here: http://noirsville.blogspot.com/2016/07/paris-texas-1984-lost-and-found-and.htm

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it seemed to blow by in no time- it felt more like it was almost an hour long, i went to imdb to try and find the run time, but they re-formatted the information on the site a while back to make it "easier and more user-friendly" and I'm ****ed if I know how to find anything besides the cast list and trivia.

If you add the word "reference" to the end of the URL, you'll get the old style of IMDb pages. See the URL that shows up in your browser for this link to Sally (1929), for example.

 

You should be able to make that permanent under "Site Preferences" under the "General" section.

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If you add the word "reference" to the end of the URL, you'll get the old style of IMDb pages. See the URL that shows up in your browser for this link to Sally (1929), for example.

 

You should be able to make that permanent under "Site Preferences" under the "General" section.

I LOVE YOU!

LHF

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My friend dragged me to go see that scary movie "Lights Out" (2016) last night. It was fine towards the beginning/middle, but towards the end, I was covering my eyes. I don't usually watch many scary movies, and it was only PG-13, so I relented. 

 

It wasn't that bad; I am pretty easily scared. I slept with the "Light On" for about an hour until it started to annoy me, so I jumped out of bed, turned the light off, and then bounded back into my bed. 

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My friend dragged me to go see that scary movie "Lights Out" (2016) last night. It was fine towards the beginning/middle, but towards the end, I was covering my eyes. I don't usually watch many scary movies, and it was only PG-13, so I relented. 

 

It wasn't that bad; I am pretty easily scared. I slept with the "Light On" for about an hour until it started to annoy me, so I jumped out of bed, turned the light off, and then bounded back into my bed. 

 

I heard a story about this film on NPR.  Apparently Lights Out started as a 3-min short film on You Tube.  It was really popular on You Tube and was discovered by a Warner Brothers rep and the director/creator was offered a chance to develop his 3-min short into a full-length feature film.  He had a small budget ($5 mil, which apparently is a drop in the bucket these days) and was also given the chance to direct the film.  He managed to assemble a group of people who knew what they were doing in film and he completed some on-the-job training.  Based on the success of Lights Out, the director has already been offered the chance to work on a second film, which a much larger budget.

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Well, in referrence to TCM, "I just watched"...

 

LITTLE BIG MAN...

 

AGAIN!

 

Not only one of my favorite Westerns, but one of my favorite MOVIES of any genre.

 

Never tire of it.   I still consider one of my "favorite" parts is when CHIEF DAN GEORGE  talks about "the black white man".  :D

 

"They're not as ugly as the white man, but they're just as CRAZY!"

 

That and his surprise at learning a white woman copulated with enthusiasm.

 

Nope.  Can't get enough!

 

 

Sepiatone

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"Painted Faces" (1929)--Starring Joe E. Brown.

 

I don't like Joe E.Brown or his brand of comedy, except in "Some Like It Hot" (1959).  That said:

 

Film is from Tiffany Films, and is a precursor of "12 Angry Men" (1957).  Movie gets off to a promising start, then treads a predictable path to the end.  The songs and touches of lunatic humor ( after two days of jury room deadlock, the women are playing bridge; the winning bid is "three spades"; one woman is chattering about whether the best bagel topping is pineapple and cream cheese or lox and cream cheese) make the first thirty minutes watchable.

 

Film sinks into a swamp of Ethnic and "cutesy" humor.  Plot twists may have been a surprise in 1929, but were obvious to me.

 

Print I saw on archivedotorg had one review.  It said the b/w print was an 1950's television print, and that PF had originally been filmed in two-tone Technicolor.  I might watch the T print if it's not Lost.

 

PF is an  intermittently interesting curio.  2/4.

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"The Fighting Kentuckian" (1949)--Starring John Wayne, Oliver Hardy, and Vera Ralston.  The print I saw  was an "Olive Films" restoration on Another site.

 

Enjoyably rambling film is set in 1817 Alabama.  Plot has something to do with post-Waterloo France winning U.S. political friends, wrongly surveyed land, and stolen money.

 

Wayne gets to show off a too seldom used gift for comedy and sarcasm.  Hardy, as his sidekick, gets to save the day more than once.  He and Wayne work well together and are a frontier comedy team when Wayne is not romancing Ralston.  Ralston tries hard, but doesn't sound French or Southern.  Marie Windsor's character is memorable.

 

Film has slow spots, but is helped past them by the musical score.

 

Watch for the technical goofs.  Film never makes the mistake of taking itself too seriously.  No Oscar winner, but a fun watch.  2.6/4. 

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It's been years since I've watched TFK, fl, but I too recall thinking afterward it better than what I had expected.

 

However, I also recall thinking when Big Duke says to Hardy, "This is another fine mess you've gotten me into", it just seemed wrong somehow.

 

(...sorry, couldn't resist) ;) 

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"Painted Faces" (1929)--Starring Joe E. Brown.

 

I don't like Joe E.Brown or his brand of comedy, except in "Some Like It Hot" (1959).  That said:

 

Film is from Tiffany Films, and is a precursor of "12 Angry Men" (1957).  Movie gets off to a promising start, then treads a predictable path to the end.  The songs and touches of lunatic humor ( after two days of jury room deadlock, the women are playing bridge; the winning bid is "three spades"; one woman is chattering about whether the best bagel topping is pineapple and cream cheese or lox and cream cheese) make the first thirty minutes watchable.

 

Film sinks into a swamp of Ethnic and "cutesy" humor.  Plot twists may have been a surprise in 1929, but were obvious to me.

 

Print I saw on archivedotorg had one review.  It said the b/w print was an 1950's television print, and that PF had originally been filmed in two-tone Technicolor.  I might watch the T print if it's not Lost.

 

PF is an  intermittently interesting curio.  2/4.

 

Brown actually started by performing in the circus, as well as being a minor league baseball player (back when minor league was considered a pro sport).  So he was more athletic than most of the other movie stars and stunt men, and performed all of his own stunts, whether the movie was sports-oriented or just slapstick physical humor.  At first the studios didn't like him doing his own stunts, but he didn't think anything of it.  He was more agile than anyone else and the take was over before anyone knew what happened.  The payoff was being able to see his face in full-body shots as he was doing his stunts

 

On the set of one of his circus movies, he actually climbed into a cage with a lion.  When the crew offered to help him, he refused.  It turned out he knew the lion from the circus and trained it as a cub, and he knew more about the lion than the current owners did.  But waited until later to tell them that part.

 

and another bit, this from IMDB:

He was one of only two civilians awarded the Bronze Star during World War II. At his own expense, he would travel frequently to Europe and the Pacific to entertain the troops, performing in all weather conditions and frequently in hospitals. He was even known to have done his entire routine for dying soldiers, or just one injured man, so he wouldn't be left out. On each trip back to the United States, he would bring sacks of mail from the servicemen to deliver to their families.

 

So not your typical Hollywood star, but definitely a memorable character, and a "can-do" attitude which was a major part of his appeal at the time.

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Forgive me for not remembering the name of it, but I really enjoyed the screen directors Playhouse half-hour TV show directed by George Marshall which featured Brown in kind of a small part and Zasu Pitts and Buster Keaton in larger ones... and a very surprise cameo by Bob Hope and an Academy Award statue.

 

The direction was ace.

 

It aired at 7:30 on TCM and the print was pristine.

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Imagine my surprise....

 

On my cable service(and others too, I'll bet) on their remote there's a little button marked "Info".  Press it once, and a bar raises from the bottom of the screen that tells you not only what channel you're on, but what's showing at the moment.  Press it again, and a short summary of whatever TV show or movie that's on will appear.

 

Tonight(and even the "grid" on the guide said this) the "info" button informed me what was on was  THE SILENT PARTNER.  However, press it again and it stated the "Silent Partner" THEY claimed was on was the 1978 Canadian production starring Elliot Gould  and Christopher Plummer.

 

Being one of my favorite movies, I tuned in.

 

Again, imagine my surprise when on came an old TV production from the old Kodak sponsored show SCREEN DIRECTOR'S PLAYHOUSE of a short filmplay with that title starring JOE E. BROWN, BUSTER KEATON and ZASU PITTS!

 

 

i'd seen it before some years ago and liked it, so I didn't mind.  But, it DID answer my wonder at why they slotted an hour and a half or so motion picture into a half-hour time slot.  And since the short film had a couple of others I've always liked in it, I also didn't mind much.

 

Like a young, slim and somewhat good looking(compared to how most of us knew him best) JACK ELAM, and PERCY KELTON.

 

I'm not sure if the mix-up was WOW's or TCM's, but it's all sawdust now, so it's all good.  :)

 

Sepiatone

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