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Laffite, I enjoyed your comments on my comments. You make want to rewatch the ending now. Perhaps I didn't properly appreciate the payoff with the painting. My only disagreement with you is yes, Bennett does tell her gal pal that Dureya never really does anything, but we do see him slap her at least twice in the movie, so he was definitely doing something, and she seemed to get off on it, which made me squirm. I will acknowledge I'm possibly overanalyzing or looking at the film from too modern a perspective when I want to take her victim status in her relationship with Dureya into account when I consider whether I should feel any sympathy for her. Lang probably didn't want me to feel any sympathy for her at all. 

 

I thought of another quite shocking element to the film that I would think would have caused trouble with the Hayes Office: a half century before there was anything like the Freedom Project, we show the institution of law enforcement executing a man for a crime he didn't commit! I can't remember if there was anything in the Code about not showing institutions like law enforcement to be corrupt or incompetent (I may be thinking of the comic book Code). Dureya is hardly a babe in the woods, but he was only guilty of some petty crimes (well, knocking around his girlfriend all the time was not so minor), certainly not anything chair-worthy! Yet another really provocative element to the film.

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Watched a bit of YOURS, MINE, and OURS with LUCILLE BALL and HENRY FONDA last night.

 

First saw it when I took my mom to see it 'cause my DAD wasn't interested.

 

I STILL get a laugh when the part of them in the supermarket comes on, and how they pay $126.63 for FOUR "heaping" shopping carts full of groceries!

 

Hell.  I can pay up to TWICE that for one HALF a cartful these days!  :D

 

 

Sepiatone

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"The Road to Hong Kong" (1962)--Starring Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, Joan Collins and Dorothy Lamour in a cameo role.

 

Last of the Road films, movie is amusing time killer that provokes smiles and the occasional laugh.  Crosby and Hope are fine in the opening number "Teamwork" and though the script lets them down, still get grins and a few laughs.  Collins had developed comic timing and comes through with some laughs as she is "straight woman" and takes Lamours' place.

 

 Lamour isn't seen until the last 35 minutes of film, and comes through with the best song ("Chemistry") and gets the biggest laughs in the film.  For 15-20 minutes, TRtHK gives the viewer a glimpse of the controlled craziness of the earlier Road films.

 

Look for unbilled cameos from David Niven, Frank Sinatra, and Dean Martin.

 

Film spoofs Grade Z "lost planet" films amusingly.

 

Movie's not great, not as good as I'd hoped.  2.4/4.

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Sewhite, it seems you may be overestimating Joan's character. She's a low-life in love with another low-life, and she's working Eddie for money. Someone like that is not expected to have much empathy. So no surprise she is bereft of "devotion, gentle affection," or "adoration." She's no girl next door.

 

I believe she said (the phone call in bed) that he threatens her but never does anything about it. We have reason to doubt that and leads to an uncomfortable conclusion that she may like that sort of treatment once in awhile.

 

It's charitable of you to suggest that she may not be responsible to her own actions. That might be true in the shrink's office talking about it, but I wouldn't factor that in with regard to the movie, i.e., I feel the story wants me to feel she is absolutely responsible for her actions.

 

Interesting point as to whether we should feel she had it coming. I don't think I get too wrapped in the characters in a movie like this. The players are not real flesh and blood in a manner of speaking, since they are so determined by the conventions of noir, etc, they seem a bit more like types or examples of the kind of people who do what they do because they are so subject to the the trappings of noir. But only to a limit. I felt sorry for Chris, the old fool falling for a young thing while not seeing through her.

 

You bring up a great point with the scene in the train. It's seems obvious that the Code felt that he was suffering enough, which was the point. But I thought it was plain obvious in itself, and didn't recall the scene in the train. That was pretty good with Chris trying to shake it off. A good scene for the plot but aimed directly at Hayes. Lang was crafty in getting that through.

 

I fear that the ending with the hanging might have been a little abrupt. But aside from that, those last 10 minutes were quite rewarding. We get to see that portrait being dangled right in front of his face, an extraordinary moment.  (I've always wish the music there were a bit more demonstrative. I wanted that milked a little). And the torment---with this ending---was given a sense of duration that adds to the poignancy of the suffering. Hanging in that room was too easy an out anyway. (Oh, laffite...)

 

That portrait was my avatar for quite awhile (though I am a monsieur).

 

Sewhite, though we are apart (in some respects) opinion-wise, I appreciate your nicely written post.

 

Yes, I agree about the ending. Those last 10 mins were really the cherry on the cake for the film and Eddie G. acted them beautifully. It may have been a bit dragged out, but far more effective than if he had just killed himself. And it appeased the code too. Is really amazing that the film ever got approved. Any discerning moviegoer would've "got" the subtext of what was going on with the characters.

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Yes, sewhite, Joan dyed her hair brunette (which I think it was originally anyway) and became a noir dame. LOL.  Actually midway as a plot device in Tradewinds. Before that she was a blonde and a good girl. Joan wisely stayed a brunette from then on. It wasnt so much a choice of moving on to lighter fare, she didnt have much choice as after Father of the Bride came out she was involved in a scandal where her hubby (Walter Wanger) shot her agent with whom she was having an affair and she became grey listed. Offers became scarce. She only starred in a few films after that an concentrated on the stage (until Dark Shadows in the 60s).

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Wow, Hibi, thanks for that tale of Hollywood Babylon! I think I vaguely remember Robert Osborne relating that story many years ago while introducing a Bennett film, but I had completely forgotten about it until reading your account just now. I went over to imdb and picked up two more really interesting tidbits: Wanger only served four months for attempted murder and Bennett and Wanger remained married, despite this "little bump in the road", until 1965!

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Interesting note: within a VERY short time after SCARLET STREET (4 years maybe?) Joan Bennett became a grandmother.

 

( she was very young when she had her daughter, who was in turn, very young when she gave birth.)

No, i didn't know her daughter had a baby very young too. I am a big Joan Bennett fan. I did read that she had her daughter when very young. I did read that her husband (WAlter Wanger) was very jealous of a man Joan was seeing and shot him (not fatally, but still he was injured). She was very beautiful in the 30's and 40's especially. I did like Woman on the Beach and Woman in the Window especially. SHe played very intriguing characters, though sleezy at times. In an earlier film she is so appealing in I Met My Love Again with Henry Fonda..

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Thanks, Lorna. I'm learning a lot about Bennett. I'm reading on imdb that Wanger shot Bennett's lover, Jennings Lang, "in the groin", which is a little vague, but I'm guessing means what I think it means. Maybe killing Lang wasn't Wanger's primary intent, just ending the physical affair by the most direct means possible? I have some morbid curiosity about whether Lang's reproductive system was still functional after the shooting. Not immediately finding any info about that.

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Wow, Hibi, thanks for that tale of Hollywood Babylon! I think I vaguely remember Robert Osborne relating that story many years ago while introducing a Bennett film, but I had completely forgotten about it until reading your account just now. I went over to imdb and picked up two more really interesting tidbits: Wanger only served four months for attempted murder and Bennett and Wanger remained married, despite this "little bump in the road", until 1965!

 

 

Yes, They stayed married until the 1960s. Although Joan said it was a marriage "in name only" in her memoirs later. Wanger was motivated to produce I Want to Live! by his prison stay. Luckily Joan's agent (Jennings Lang who later became a big producer at Univeral), suffered  only minor injuries. Shot in the groin, but missed anything "important!" LOL.

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"Thoroughly Modern Millie" (1967)--Starring Julie Andrews, James Fox, Mary Tyler Moore (MTM), and Bea Lillie.

 

I saw the Roadshow print (I Think): the Overture, Intermission, and Exit Music adds eight minutes to the running time.  This version ran for not quite 146 minutes, as opposed to TCM's running time of 138 minutes.

 

Universal musical directed by George Roy Hill is wildly inconsistent, except in one respect; Elmer Bernstein's Oscar winning score carries the film, from its' title song, to Carol Channing's "I'm A Jazz Baby" number, through film's slow/irritating/self-consciously "Cute" spots.

 

Hill has to be given credit; he attempted a spoof of early silent movies, with  effects like wipes, title cards, and visuals like using pastels for most of the colors, especially MTM's outfits.  He does an extended riff on Harold Lloyds' "Safety Last" (1923), which is funny and effective.  Sometimes he is off by a decade or so; when the secondary pair of lovers first meet, they duet to "Ah, Sweet Mystery of Life", which is amusing, but thirteen years early (film is set in 1922).  Each character spoofs a type.

 

Julie Andrews is the Perky heroine.  Her parody is right on target, and her singing and dancing are also near perfect.  I found MTM irritatingly helpless, until I recognized her type was the helpless Rich girl who never does Anything for herself.  Then, I enjoyed MTM's performance.  James Fox was enjoyable in his role; I didn't know he could sing.  John Gavin, as Millies' boss, must have been directed to act as woodenly as Nelson Eddy; again, I didn't know he could sing.  

 

TMM was one of the last 1960's "Roadshow" musicals to make a profit.

 

TMM has a wonderful musical score, but an uneven script and too many "cutesy" moments offset that strength.  Still, TMM is more than worth seeing.  2.8/4

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TMM was one of the last 1960's "Roadshow" musicals to make a profit.

 

 

I always keep unfairly confusing it in with Darling Lili and Star! in the Julie Andrews Roadshow Flop Musical "trilogy"--I know it made a profit, but things work better in threes.

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Watched a bit of YOURS, MINE, and OURS with LUCILLE BALL and HENRY FONDA last night.

 

First saw it when I took my mom to see it 'cause my DAD wasn't interested.

 

I STILL get a laugh when the part of them in the supermarket comes on, and how they pay $126.63 for FOUR "heaping" shopping carts full of groceries!

 

Hell.  I can pay up to TWICE that for one HALF a cartful these days!  :D

 

 

Sepiatone

 

That scene and the narration of their morning are my favorites. Bless the real life family who actually did that. My Mom and I used to question how that family operated and how many times they went to the store a week. Wow. 

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That scene and the narration of their morning are my favorites. Bless the real life family who actually did that. My Mom and I used to question how that family operated and how many times they went to the store a week. Wow. 

 

Welcome to the Board.

 

Wow, you LIKED your own post. That's quite brash for a newbie.

;)  just kidding

 

Are you Miss Julie ... perchance?

 

Most probably not ... I hope ... (she had a tough life, after all)

 

==

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Agreed.  Of the three films I discussed, The Snake Pit was my favorite too.  Lee Patrick and Beulah Bondi did play fellow inmates as did Ann Doran, who you may recognize as James Dean's mother in Rebel Without a Cause.  She was very good as the mute patient with tendency toward violence.  I thought that the way that de Havilland's character took Doran's character under her wing to make her feel comfortable enough to not resort to violence and also to regain her speaking ability was very touching, and demonstrated that de Havilland's character was not completely lost and showed potential to recover. Their ending scene is very sweet.   I also thought Celeste Holm was excellent.  The more I see of her, the more I like her.

I did like Celeste Holm and Ann Doran here too. Yes, Celeste was marvelous in this film and in several others. Another great performance was in Roadhouse with Ida Lupino.

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I watched GOING MY WAY last night because I was too tired to read and too lazy to change the channel.

 

I don't get this "movie"- which honestly, shouldn't really be called a movie in my book as it isn't so much a film with a cohesive narrative as it is a series of collected shorts that would've seemed more at home as a running series in JOHN NESBITT'S PASSING PARADE. Even the sequel THE BELLS OF SAINT MARY'S has a more solid story to fill the two hours run time.

 

One of those films like JOHNNY BELINDA, TITANIC, LOVE IS A MANY SPLENDORED THING and THE TOWERING INFERNO that would've had no shot at the major Oscars had they not defied expectations and made HUGE MONEY at the box office; but with the passing of time seem more and more preposterous as selections of what the "best" of their respective years were considered to be.

 

There were SO MANY superior films in 1944.

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I like Johnny Belinda.

 

Well, I am just cheesin' off EVERYBODY today, aren't I?

 

JOHNNY BELINDA has its strong points- the scenery, Agnes Moorehead and Jan Sterling, the sympathetic view towards women's issues- but at its heart is a misdirected performance from Jane Wyman and a patronizing, rather didactic, performance by Lew Ayres.

 

It's okay, but to me, not one of the best pictures of 1948.

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Well, I am just cheesin' off EVERYBODY today, aren't I?

 

JOHNNY BELINDA has its strong points- the scenery, Agnes Moorehead and Jan Sterling, the sympathetic view towards women's issues- but at its heart is a misdirected performance from Jane Wyman and a patronizing, rather didactic, performance by Lew Ayres.

 

It's okay, but to me, not one of the best pictures of 1948.

 

Awww, you ain't cheezin' me, Lorna dear. I just wanted to state my like for the film, to say that some people liked it anyway. I enjoy your acerbic posts, so keep it up.

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Awww, you ain't cheezin' me, Lorna dear. I just wanted to state my like for the film, to say that some people liked it anyway. I enjoy your acerbic posts, so keep it up.

 

for the record, i think JOHNNY BELINDA could have been a great film- it's my understanding that Jack Warner did some meddling with it and kind of supplanted Jean Negulesco (who was a good director and one who was BRILLIANT with visuals) in the final word on a lot of the details about the film.

 

they did a TCM spotlight(?) on disabilities a while back and Marlee Matlin was critical of JOHNNY BELINDA for the fact that they got a lot of the details wrong- i think the character is deaf, but capable of making sound, and the scene of her childbirth and attack are played with her being utterly silent, which doesn't really make sense.

 

i also do think it's safe to say that had BELINDA not been SUCH  a HUGE hit that surpassed modest expectations and a troubled production, there's no way it would've been nominated in every major category for 1948.

 

i really do like Jane Wyman a lot, but there's just no way she'd've beat DeHavilland in THE SNAKE PIT, Dunne in I REMEMBER MAMA and STANWYCK in SORRY, WRONG NUMBER had the film not been one of the top five grossers of the year.

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I watched GOING MY WAY last night because I was too tired to read and too lazy to change the channel.

 

I don't get this "movie"- which honestly, shouldn't really be called a movie in my book as it isn't so much a film with a cohesive narrative as it is a series of collected shorts that would've seemed more at home as a running series in JOHN NESBITT'S PASSING PARADE. Even the sequel THE BELLS OF SAINT MARY'S has a more solid story to fill the two hours run time.

 

 

Actually, heard that Bells was the first film, and Going was the "Bing's back!" sequel, which the studio put ahead since it featured more of Bing's singing.

Either way, both movies reflect that 40's wartime view that all the problems in the city and the world at war would be solved if people would just go back to church!  Not any particular church, just the one of Your Denomination.  The subplots in Going are basically a series of Touched By an Angel episodes where characters symbolically representing all of Today's Troubles from the Headlines find them solved with a little "divine intervention" by Bing, after they realize how bad and selfish and shallow they were all these years and learn to start coming back every Sunday.

 

(While Ingrid Bergman and Barry Fitzgerald also represents 40's people's fears of Catholicism--Most churches are Catholic in the big cities but Protestant in the suburbs, and the Ice-Nun and the Old Irish Priest are both stereotypes of people's view of harsh, outdated dogmatic clergy pushing sin on their heads...But hey, priests can't be all bad if the young swingin' Bingle is one, writing some more of his hit songs, can he?  Why, even the Dead End Kids love him too!)

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