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"Black Moon" (1934)--Starring Fay Wray, Dorothy Burgess, and Jack Holt.  Directed by Roy William Neill, who also made "The Black Room" (1935), "Gypsy Wildcat" (1944), and several 40's Sherlock Holmes films--all of which are worth at least one watch.

 

The film is about a womans' return to an island near Haiti, and her prior and subsequent involvement with voodoo.  Underwritten screenplay tells the viewer instead of showing showing them any hint of her early involvement.  This would be a routine film, except for three things:

 

(1)--Joseph Augusts' eerie cinematography; it furnishes the dread and feeling of impending doom that the screenplay lacks.  August also photographed "The Informer" (1935), and was nominated for an Oscar for "Portrait of Jennie" (1949).

 

(2)--The atmospheric music score by Louis Silvers (he was uncredited for some reason, but TCM's article on Black Moon names him as composer in the end list of credits).  Very effective and frightening use of drums and strings.

 

(3)--Wray's strong performance in a ill-defined role that's better than the screenplay deserves

 

Film is little known entry in the horror field that is worth at least one watch.  2.6/4.

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Actually, heard that Bells was the first film, and Going was the "Bing's back!" sequel, which the studio put ahead since it featured more of Bing's singing.

Either way, both movies reflect that 40's wartime view that all the problems in the city and the world at war would be solved if people would just go back to church! Not any particular church, just the one of Your Denomination. The subplots in Going are basically a series of Touched By an Angel episodes where characters symbolically representing all of Today's Troubles from the Headlines find them solved with a little "divine intervention" by Bing, after they realize how bad and selfish and shallow they were all these years and learn to start coming back every Sunday.

 

(While Ingrid Bergman and Barry Fitzgerald also represents 40's people's fears of Catholicism--Most churches are Catholic in the big cities but Protestant in the suburbs, and the Ice-Nun and the Old Irish Priest are both stereotypes of people's view of harsh, outdated dogmatic clergy pushing sin on their heads...But hey, priests can't be all bad if the young swingin' Bingle is one, writing some more of his hit songs, can he? Why, even the Dead End Kids love him too!)

Love it!

 

I also read that BELLS preceeded GOING MY WAY, which surprised me quite a bit...it just SEEMS like it would be the other way around, but I'm willing to take everyone else's word for it.

 

The real mystery to me is the 1947(46?) Film WELCOME STRANGER, which reteamed Crosby, Barry Fitzgerald, and Rise Stevens. It was an absolute BLOCKBUSTER- the highest grossing film of whatever year it came out, and considering the huge percentage of the movie-going populace who went to the movies back then that is no small feat.

 

However, it seems to have fallen into complete and utter obscurity. Is it on DVD? And has TCM ever shown it?

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I've never heard that Bells was to precede Going My Way, seeing as Bells was put together to combine Going My Way's Oscar winners with the Best Actress winner (Bergman from Gaslight). 

 

Edit: I see in the IMDb trivia on Bells that its script was  written first. Also, Bergman was cast before her Oscar win, as she commented on Oscar night that she started filming Bells the following day.

 

I didn't know Welcome Stranger.  I see according to Wiki that it earned $6.1 million. However, it's not even listed in the top 20 earning films of 1947 (year of release), even though Unconquered, which is listed as #1 of the year, also earned $6.1 million. Strange.

Edited by LawrenceA
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I've never heard that Bells was to precede Going My Way, seeing as Bells was put together to combine Going My Way's Oscar winners with the Best Actress winner (Bergman from Gaslight).

 

Edit: I see in the IMDb trivia on Bells that its script was written first. Also, Bergman was cast before her Oscar win, as she commented on Oscar night that she started filming Bells the following day.

 

I didn't know Welcome Stranger. I see according to Wiki that it earned $6.1 million. However, it's not even listed in the top 20 earning films of 1947 (year of release), even though Unconquered, which is listed as #1 of the year, also earned $6.1 million. Strange.

I used to have an old HOLLYWOOD REPORTER book called BOX OFFICE HITS, it only covered the years 1939 to 1988 but it listed the top five highest grossing films of each year. It did not adjust for inflation, but I do think it counted rerelease Revenue. I distinctly recall it had WELCOME STRANGER as the number one film for either 1946 or 1947, and I do recall UNCONQUERED was listed in the top five.

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.But hey, priests can't be all bad if the young swingin' Bingle is one, writing some more of his hit songs, can he?

And Bing turned out to be abusing children, just like a real Catholic priest!

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LornaHansonForbes--TCM has "Welcome Stranger" (1947) on DVD.

 

It's been shown at least twice; it has one User Review from 2010 and two from Jan. 2013. It's overdue for another showing, if TCM is showing it every three years.

Thanks!

 

I can't think of another top grossing film from the era that has fallen into such obscurity. ( even among Classics junkies like us!)

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And Bing turned out to be abusing children, just like a real Catholic priest!

Very Very sad to have read this in different sources.. Bing's wonderful voice is so charming voice in several other films which seems to reveal a kind and pleasant person. As for the Catholic priests, some have been guilty of abuse of children as well. Bing left a great legacy of films, but it is sad that our White Christmas singer turned out to be a clay idol. I wondered if he had been abused by his father and followed suit.

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This may not be very tasteful to bring up, but various people have contested Gary's account of Bing's abuse over the years.

 

EDIT: and from Reading Bing's entry on Wikipedia, a few have also confirmed it: including two of his sons and his brother. It's a sad fact that all four Crosby boys died rather young, two by suicide.

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"Black Moon" (1934)--Starring Fay Wray, Dorothy Burgess, and Jack Holt.  Directed by Roy William Neill, who also made "The Black Room" (1935), "Gypsy Wildcat" (1944), and several 40's Sherlock Holmes films--all of which are worth at least one watch.

 

The film is about a womans' return to an island near Haiti, and her prior and subsequent involvement with voodoo.  Underwritten screenplay tells the viewer instead of showing showing them any hint of her early involvement.  This would be a routine film, except for three things:

 

(1)--Joseph Augusts' eerie cinematography; it furnishes the dread and feeling of impending doom that the screenplay lacks.  August also photographed "The Informer" (1935), and was nominated for an Oscar for "Portrait of Jennie" (1949).

 

(2)--The atmospheric music score by Louis Silvers (he was uncredited for some reason, but TCM's article on Black Moon names him as composer in the end list of credits).  Very effective and frightening use of drums and strings.

 

(3)--Wray's strong performance in a ill-defined role that's better than the screenplay

 

 

 

Film is little known entry in the horror field that is worth at least one watch.  2.6/4.

I like Fay Wray's performance in this film and the cinematography and music that heightened the eerie suspense.

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"The Anniversary" (1968)--Starring Bette Davis, directed by Roy Ward Baker.

 

Hammer horror/social comedy is all Bettes' show.  First fifteen minutes are Slow, and then Davis makes her entrance down a staircase; her first line--"Bloody Hell !" sets the tone for the film.

 

Davis effectively wipes the rest of the cast from the screen.  She ranges from funny to horrifying.  Her lines don't have the charge they must have had in 1968, but Davis delivers them like she's detonating  verbal bombshells.  

 

This isn't one of the Davis films TCM is showing August 21st.  Saw film on a different website.

 

This is an uneven film, but is very worth watching.  2.7/4.

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Just saw Ann Carver’s Profession. I can only chuckle at the movie’s ending. While the problems of Ann and Bill are still relevant today, the resolution would not work in 2016. Ann, a housewife is encouraged by her husband, Bill, former college football star and entry level architect, to put her law degree to use and go to work. Ann wins a big case (which was sadly a sign of the times then) and is paid $5000. Bill is happy Ann won the case but not about the $5000 payday. A year later, a fancy new house and servants thanks to Ann, Ann is still a successful lawyer and Bill is still in the same position at work. They both admitted Ann’s job and money are putting a strain on the marriage but they haven’t come to a solution to the problem. To raise his financial status, Bill quits his job and works as a nightclub singer. A nightclub singer, Carole, kisses Bill but he rejects her. Unfortunately Ann and a group of her friends sees the kiss and thinks Bill is cheating on her. Bill doesn’t explain the situation but he moves into an apartment and starts a relationship with Carole ignoring Ann’s pleas to reconcile. :o    ​ :huh:

 

Bill and Carole’s relationship sour and while he’s at the club, Carole gets drunk and accidentally chokes herself. Bill is on trial for Carole’s death. Ann wants to defend Bill knowing he is innocent but he still rejects her.   :rolleyes: Ann’s boss convinces Bill to let his wife defend him. Ann wins the case by telling the jury she’s at fault for Bill being on trial. Bill worked at the club and met Carole because she drove him away with her career and money. The movie concludes with Ann giving up her career, they move into a modest house, Bill goes back to being an architect and is finally successful (probably because of the trial) and they discuss having children.

 

2016 Ann would’ve divorced Bill and let him rot in jail. :lol: No way would she have begged him to take her back and give up her job.   ​

Edited by Miss J
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Can we talk about new movies in this thread?  I just watched a really recent film, it was showing in first-run cinemas a few months ago, and I just rented it on DVD.

 

Richard Linklater's  Everybody Wants Some.

 

Damn, this thing was fun. Anyone who's a fan of Dazed and Confused will probably think so too. Everybody Wants Some is like a sequel to the earlier film. Well, not a "sequel" in the usual sense- it's got entirely different characters and setting. But of all Linklater's work that followed Dazed and Confused, this one's the most like it. I think one critic called E.W. S. its "spiritual sequel". Good way to put it.

Like Dazed and Confused, this latest offering from Linklater features a group of young people hanging around and having fun, making friends, flirting,(and all that goes with it), and - by today's poe-faced standards- generally misbehaving.

It's 1980, and a group of young men are getting ready for the first day of classes at a nameless college. Their way of getting ready is to get stoned, drunk, listen to music from an impressive collection of records (anyone remember those milk cartons they were stored in?), hit the local clubs looking for chicks, philosophize (especially while stoned and listening to Pink Floyd), and not least, practice baseball. The guys are at college on baseball scholarships, and they take it pretty seriously.

 

But like almost all Richard Linklater movies, plot is the film's least important element. It's really just about these young guys starting a new phase in their lives, and having as much fun as possible before school begins. In this way it's the opposite of Dazed and Confused , which takes place the last day of high school.

 

Why am I devoting so much time and attention to what many would regard as a pretty lightweight movie? Because I love its shameless celebration of innocent hedonism. In 1980, nobody worried about 6 guys riding around in a car, ogling the campus girls, good-naturedly insulting each other, and downing pitchers of beer (not while in the car, I hasten to add...).  It reminded me a little of Animal House, revisited 32 years later.

 

It's kind of a "bro" movie; yet I, who am definitely not a bro, wholeheartedly enjoyed it. Maybe some of this has to do with the fact that I was about the same age as the film's characters in 1980, when Everybody Wants Some is set. I can't help but wallow a little in nostalgia, because Linklater gets it so right:  the music, the clothes, the way people talked.  Just as he did with Dazed and Confused

 

I recommend Everybody Wants Some for those who like to just relax and sometimes have a bit of fun watching a film. It does not pretend to offer any great insights, but it's smart and funny and refreshingly politically incorrect, as people in 1980 were. A very entertaining 117 minutes.

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Just saw Ann Carver’s Profession. While the problems of Ann and Bill are still relevant today, the resolution would not work in 2016.

 

You fail to mention just when this movie was made.

 

Don't restrain yourself from writing the entire story out for us, however. 

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THE ISLAND OF DR. MOREAU (1977).

 

I watched this take on the H. G. Wells novel recently about the "mad" scientist experimenting with animals on a South Seas island, performing surgery on them in "the House of Pain" to try to transform them into human beings. Of course, things never go as planned in these films. Moreau is, after all, "tampering in God's domain" (though that hoary old expression is mercifully not used in this film).

 

Difficult to not compare this version to the first adaption, 1933's Island of Lost Souls, which I find far more satisfactory. In the original Charles Laughton brought a creepy, perverse quality to his Moreau. He was unsettling but effective, and when he cracked that whip in the "What is the law?" scene with the man beasts there was more than a hint of the sadist about him.

 

The surprising casting of Burt Lancaster as Moreau in the 1977 version fails to bring any of these same odious qualities to the film. It's difficult to work up much of a dislike for Lancaster's scientist in spite of his activities. He's still Burt, and he has to battle against his good guy screen persona.

 

Island of Dr. Moreau also surprisingly jettisons one of the kinkiest aspects of the 1933 film, the Panther Girl, as originally played by Kathleen Burke, his most near perfection human like creation from a beast, with whom Laughton's Moreau is eager to see if an unsuspecting male shipwrecked on his island (Richard Arlen) will be willing to mate.

 

The '77 version does have beautiful Barbara Carrera slinking around, and she certainly intrigues (well, more than intrigues) Michael York, now in the Arlen role. Lancaster is aware that they are sexually attracted to each other and ready to mate - but to what purpose, since it turns out Carrera is a normal human, and no kind of Panther Girl. There is a hint in her final scene, however, that she may not be quite so normal, after all, but it went by so quickly I wasn't quite certain if it was my imagination.

 

The man beasts in the original are more effective than here. For starters, you don't get a really good look at their makeup (outside of a closeup of Bela Lugosi) so much of it is left to the audience's imagination. In the '77 version you see the makeup and, to be honest, it's not so much frightening as it is artificial in appearance (on about a par with that to be found in the original Planet of the Apes).

 

The '77 version, however, interestingly, does show what happens to the man beasts after everything blows up on the island, something the '33 original left to our imagination. This version also has Moreau strapping down and experimenting with York, something not done in the '33 version. That is one of the more interesting aspects of this production, as well.

 

In the final analysis, this is a fairly mediocre adaption of the Wells story, but one should still see it to make his own assessment. There would be another version with Brando almost 20 years later, of course. It's been too long since I've seen that version to talk about it, though I do recall disliking it at the time.

 

IslandOfDrMoreau2.jpg

 

2.5 out of 4 stars

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SUICIDE SQUAD (2016)

If you don't enjoy movies with a lot of action/some degree of violence, then I wouldn't recommend this movie for you. 

 

That being said, I did enjoy this movie, despite "Rotten Tomatoes" and other online reviewing sites. There was a strong beginning to the film, with an equally strong middle, and a bit weaker ending. There were some parts that were really predictable, but that's to be expected with comic book inspired movies. The casting was great; each and every one of the lead actors was able to realistically portray their individual characters well. 

 

I don't understand why this movie is receiving so much animosity online, and with paid reviewers. I definitely enjoyed this one more than I did "Batman vs. Superman," that's for dang sure. I am more inclined to watch Marvel movies rather than DC comics' movies, but this one pleasantly surprised me. 

 

One thing I appreciated, was the fact that there didn't seem to be a ton of unnecessary CGI/special effects (*cough cough, Michael Bay) 

 

I wouldn't bring kids younger than maybe 10 or 11 to go see this, but, hey, that's what the ratings are for (although some parents where I live seem to be blind to this). 

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"The Anniversary" (1968)--Starring Bette Davis, directed by Roy Ward Baker.

 

Hammer horror/social comedy is all Bettes' show.  First fifteen minutes are Slow, and then Davis makes her entrance down a staircase; her first line--"Bloody Hell !" sets the tone for the film.

 

Davis effectively wipes the rest of the cast from the screen.  She ranges from funny to horrifying.  Her lines don't have the charge they must have had in 1968, but Davis delivers them like she's detonating  verbal bombshells.  

 

This isn't one of the Davis films TCM is showing August 21st.  Saw film on a different website.

 

This is an uneven film, but is very worth watching.  2.7/4.

 

 

Havent seen this film in a long time, but it's very funny if you are in the right mood. Love that eyepatch! :D Wish TCM would air it.

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Just saw Ann Carver’s Profession. While the problems of Ann and Bill are still relevant today, the resolution would not work in 2016.

 

You fail to mention just when this movie was made.

 

Don't restrain yourself from writing the entire story out for us, however. 

 

No summaries. Gotcha. I know to remember when a movie was made when watching. If I didn't, I wouldn't be able to watch or enjoy a lot of classic movies. I laugh at how some things were which is what I did as I watched this movie. In fact, it's refreshing to see because of how much progress has been made in society. :)

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SUICIDE SQUAD (2016)

If you don't enjoy movies with a lot of action/some degree of violence, then I wouldn't recommend this movie for you. 

 

That being said, I did enjoy this movie, despite "Rotten Tomatoes" and other online reviewing sites. There was a strong beginning to the film, with an equally strong middle, and a bit weaker ending. There were some parts that were really predictable, but that's to be expected with comic book inspired movies. The casting was great; each and every one of the lead actors was able to realistically portray their individual characters well. 

 

I don't understand why this movie is receiving so much animosity online, and with paid reviewers. I definitely enjoyed this one more than I did "Batman vs. Superman," that's for dang sure. I am more inclined to watch Marvel movies rather than DC comics' movies, but this one pleasantly surprised me. 

 

One thing I appreciated, was the fact that there didn't seem to be a ton of unnecessary CGI/special effects (*cough cough, Michael Bay) 

 

I wouldn't bring kids younger than maybe 10 or 11 to go see this, but, hey, that's what the ratings are for (although some parents where I live seem to be blind to this). 

 

Could the animosity be because of the criticism BvS received and the reshoots of Suicide Squad after BvS? Thanks for the review. I've been debating if I should see it or wait until cable because I was disappointed in BvS but I might bite the bullet and see it on discount day at my local theater.

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"Cat O' Nine Tails" (1971)--Starring Karl Malden, directed by Dario Argento.

 

Disappointing horror film where I guessed the killer in the first half hour.  In addition, the victims are remarkably stupid.  They open doors and forget to close them, don't leave their apartments and call the cops when they repeatedly hear odd noises at night, etc.  

 

The plot: a blind man out for a walk overhears a blackmailer planning a murder.  A burglary of a biological research center follows, along with several murders.

 

The effective, unsettling musical score is by Ennio Morricone.

 

The violence is badly acted, and the special effects are below par until the final fifteen minutes, which are good and tense.  For me, it was too little, too late.  1.9/4. 

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