Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

"Four Frightened People" (1934)--Starring Claudette Colbert, Herbert Marshall, Mary Boland, and William Gargan, directed by Cecil B. DeMille.

 

This Pre-Code movie ( it was released in early 1934) ends up as a  parody of jungle films, thanks to its' not deciding if it's a drama,romance, adventure film,  or comedy.  The mix of acting approaches makes the film funnier.  Boland plays her part for comedy after the opening minutes, Marshall and Colbert play their parts for high drama, and Gargan plays his part straight faced.

 

The plot; the four are passengers on a Malay bound steamer, and bubonic plague breaks out among the crew.  The passengers panic and commandeer a lifeboat so they don't catch the disease.  They make it to an island, but have to go through a jungle  to make it to civilization.

 

There are numerous bits of insanity in this film.  Colbert breaks her glasses and becomes beautiful; the Four play bridge after a hard days' hike; Boland carries a little dog (Pekinese?) throughout the film; Marshall gets a Native spear right in the spine, and there's not only no blood, he also recovers in ten minutes time.

 

DeMille has the bath scene under a waterfall this time; a monkey steals Colberts' clothes, and she makes clothes out of tree leaves.

 

Boland is hysterical, whatever she does.  Marshall lets loose with sarcastic one liners.  Colbert is too serious, and Gargan is just annoying.

 

A very funny film after the first ten minutes, whether it was meant to be funny or not.  3/4.

Yes, I like this one too. Unintential humor is threaded here and there. I love Claudette's films and she was delightful here. Also, the suave Herbert Marshall was entertaining with his one liners. Mary Boland was great in hysterics. What adventures! I give it 3 out of 4 too.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I am so glad you liked FIVE STAR FINAL!

 

It's one of my favorites and it holds up wonderfully on repeat viewings (you miss layers of innuendo here and there.)

I like this one too. The cast is great and we do see a lot of innuendoes and eventually guilt feelings of our major star. In the end we see how a caring family can be destroyed with unfair gossip, simply to sell a newspaper column.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In a departure from my SUTS viewing, the other night I watched the 1941 remake of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde starring Spencer Tracy, Ingrid Bergman, and Lana Turner.

 

The good: Ingrid, Lana and Donald Crisp.  I thought these three were the best part of the film.  Ingrid did a great job playing against type as the barmaid who unfortunately catches the eye of Mr. Hyde.  I also liked Lana, also cast against type, as the good girl who is in love with Dr. Jekyll.  I also liked Crisp, who played Lana's father.  He has a very calming and soothing voice which is a nice change of pace from Spencer Tracy's two faced character.  I also liked the bizarre montage that would appear when Dr. Jekyll was drinking his elixir.  

 

The bad: Spencer Tracy.  He was too over the top and too hammy.  It just didn't work for me.  His Mr. Hyde makeup made me laugh.  It reminded me of Danny DeVito's "The Penguin" character in Batman Returns.   

 

Let's just say that I started watching this film and toward the last third or so of the film, my attentions had drifted to watching things on You Tube.  

 

I thought this movie was boring.

[/quote

Very interesting factors. A friend recently found his old VHS of the 1941 remake of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. There were extra scenes that we don't see in the one currently shown. It is a shame to cut films needlessly. THere are things that are integral to the plot here. The tape is very blurred and hard to watch, but I gleaned the essence of what my friend meant. There is a scene where Tracy as Hyde looks into the mirror and taunts Dr. Jekyll and he is even more frightening with a scary close-up. He challenges him and says he cannot win out and marry his lady love. (THis is just before the tragedy of Hyde killing Lana's dad - Donald Crisp in the film). So she witnesses this horrific event more clearly. Just preceding this scene, Dr. Jekyll has more warning dreams where Lana and Ingrid's characters (scantily clad) are fleeing on horseback - only at a more horrific pace! THe symbolism is more effectively shown here, I did see this version as a child on TV in the 60's and it was pretty frightening. I really don't recall if it aired with the extra footage then, but it definitely is now shown with the deleted scenes currently.. When viewing the Fredric March 30's version just recently, I found it to be more authentic and frightening in the scenes with Mr. Hyde threatening Ivy. Miriam Hopkins gives an authentic performance as the terrified girl who is pursued by the evil Mr. Hyde.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

IT REALLY IS.

 

The Froderic March version is much better- honestly I think Tracy was a real life Jekyll/Hyde, and his trying to one-up March by redoing his Oscar winning role went down in flames, but as a nasty backstory: MGM bought as many negatives of the March version from Paramount and destroyed them. it almost ended up being lost forever!

 

I also hate the sea of diahrrea during the 1941 transition scenes and the awful Bergman/Turner as Horses imagery.

 

Victor Fleming may have had some issues with women....

 

I agree with you and Speedracer. The March version (directed by the great Mamoulian) is much better. The Tracy version is overstuffed -- too much "upholstery," in every sense.  One thing I've always found amusing about the March version, though, is that when he's got up as Mr. Hyde, he looks a little like Jerry Lewis!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Both sides of her face?

I read that she only wanted to be photographed on one side, as she thought she was unattractive on the other. I have watched carefully in each film and can't see a difference! I read she didn't have a choice in some films like Drums Along the Mohawk. In every film she gave a fantastic performance. My favorite is Tomorrow is Forever..

Link to post
Share on other sites

God WILD RIVER was beautiful!

I'm glad you liked it so much. I couldn't agree more. The autumnal cinematography is beautiful, and the scene on the raft as Lee Remick and Monty drift across the river while she sings "The Garden" is one of my favorites in all cinema.

 

This is one of the few classic Hollywood films about the South that rings true. It's historically accurate that TVA was an important force for integration to parts of the South.

 

I also love that the main conflict is good vs. good--the need to save lives by damming the river vs. Ella Garth's natural desire to keep her home.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
The 3rd Voice (1960)

 

The%2B3rd%2BVoice%2BMovie%2BPoster.jpg

 

Directed by  Hubert Cornfield. Written by Hubert Cornfield (Sudden Danger (1955), (Plunder Road (1957), and based on "All The Way " aka “The Concrete Flamingo” a novel first published in 1958 by Charles Williams (Dead Calm (1989), The Hot Spot (1990)). Cinematography was by Ernest Haller (The Unfaithful (1947), The Come On (1956), ) and music by Johnny Mandel.

 

The film stars Edmond O'Brien (one of the kings of classic noir with 10+ films), Julie London (The Red House (1947), The Fat Man (1951), Crime Against Joe (1956)), Laraine Day (The Woman on Pier 13 (1949)), Olga San Juan, George Eldredge, Tom Hernández, Abel Franco, Tom Daly, and Ralph Brooks.

 

The 3rd Voice is entertaining, it's mostly Edmund Obrien's show with some nice eye candy provided by Julie London. It's essential for a Edmund O'Brien completists or Julie London fans. Screencaps are from a multi-copy avi file, it could use a restoration. 6.5-7/10 Full review with more screencaps in Film Noir/Gangster page TCM here, and here: http://noirsville.blogspot.com/2016/08/the-3rd-voice-1960.html

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm glad you liked it so much. I couldn't agree more. The autumnal cinematography is beautiful, and the scene on the raft as Lee Remick and Monty drift across the river while she sings "The Garden" is one of my favorites in all cinema.

 

This is one of the few classic Hollywood films about the South that rings true. It's historically accurate that TVA was an important force for integration to parts of the South.

 

I also love that the main conflict is good vs. good--the need to save lives by damming the river vs. Ella Garth's natural desire to keep her home.

 

tumblr_mr91s9poCK1qzgwh4o2_500.gif

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I just watched Million Dollar Mermaid. Annette Kellerman was a real pioneer for women’s swimwear and the swimming sport itself. I thought it was very fitting for Esther Williams to have a day especially with the Olympics going on. Too bad WWII prevented Esther Williams from competing and winning any Olympic medals. She was a superb swimmer and diver.

 

I also saw Neptune’s Daughter. I laughed at the role reversal of “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” performed by Betty Garrett and Red Skeleton. Very tongue in cheek. It was nice to see Mel Blanc on screen. I only know him from his voices on Looney Tune cartoons.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I read that she only wanted to be photographed on one side, as she thought she was unattractive on the other. I have watched carefully in each film and can't see a difference! I read she didn't have a choice in some films like Drums Along the Mohawk. In every film she gave a fantastic performance. My favorite is Tomorrow is Forever..

 

She claimed she had a bump on her nose on one side.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jason Bourne (2016) at the movie theater where I work. It's been a while since I've seen the first few Bourne flms; my dad made me watch them when I was about 5 years old or so... I thought the action in this one was great. It also kept me guessing just who the "bad guy" was almost the entire time. All in all, I think it was a pretty good film. Score: 3.5/5

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

"Experiment Perilous" (1944)--Starring Hedy Lamarr, George Brent, and Paul Lukas.

 

Jacques Tourneur directed this RKO historical melodrama.  Film has a good cast, excellent director, atmospheric cinematography by Tony Gaudio, the money spent definitely shows on the screen.  What's wrong?  The wordy, SSSllloooowww script (blamed on Warren Duff) that is All talk and no action ( until the last twenty minutes), that echoes "Gaslight" (1944).  

 

Film's characters talk...and talk....and Talk.  When there's finally a confrontation between good and bad guys, they Yap...and yap before there's any action.  Director Tourneur and his cast do their utmost, but they can't totally redeem the script.  They Do make the film watchable and intermittently fascinating.  Gaudio's photography and the performances are better than the script deserves.  2.5/4.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm watching The Conspirators, which I have seen before.

 

While this is a Warner Bros. film and the casting reeks of a Casablanca sequel with Henreid,  GreenStreet and Lorre, as well as the Lisbon setting,   there is also a Gilda trio with Joseph Calleia, George Macready, and Steven Geray. 

 

In addition Hedy Lamarr from MGM is the leading lady.    I couldn't find why WB cast so many non WB contract players in this film.    (Or were those Gilda actors WB players but moved over to Columbia?)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

So, you're trying to tell us you're NINETEEN years old?

 

Sepiatone

 

Why shouldn't she be nineteen? I think it's great when young people join these boards. And why should we assume that only middle-aged to old people are members here?

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Trials of Oscar Wilde (1960, dir. Ken Hughes), viewed online. Two of the reels had German subtitles, but that wasn't too distracting. Oscar Wilde (dir. Gregory Ratoff) was released the same year, which probably killed the box office for both. Those interested in Wilde may want to search out both. Ratoff's picture is in black and white and has a low budget; Trials has beautiful color cinematography and enough money for gorgeous sets and costumes.

 

If Robert Morley (Ratoff) is too old and too heavy to play Oscar--he had made a name for himself in the late 30s playing Wilde, and he must have been perfect for the role then--Peter Finch (Hughes) doesn't look like Wilde at all, despite the makeup. However, although Finch is hardly ideal casting, he is a good actor who does his considerable best, and I came to enjoy his work a good bit. John Fraser is just about perfect as the shallow, manipulative, emotionally volatile Bosie to Finch's Oscar. James Mason is a fine choice to play Sir Edward Carson, who represented the Marquess of Queensbury in the first trial. (Ralph Richardson is also first-rate as Carson in the Ratoff film.)

 

Lionel Jeffries probably gives the best performance of all as Queensbury, close to mania yet not without moments where we can sympathize with him. Astonishingly, Jeffries was only 33 when he made the film, about six years older than John Fraser, who played his son.

 

Given the mores of 1960, Trials spares us from the explicit nature of some of the testimony, and shows us only one of the men with whom Wilde was accused of having "indecent relations."

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Why shouldn't she be nineteen? I think it's great when young people join these boards. And why should we assume that only middle-aged to old people are members here?

 

I think Sepia might have been merely expressing surprise that there is someone that young here (if she is).

 

Whatever happened to ILoveRayMilland, a 13-year-old here back in '08-'09? What a wonderful little prodigy she was! Her posts were so mature that most probably had no clue that she might be that young.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

"Tap Roots" (1948)--Starring Susan Hayward, Van Heflin, Boris Karloff, and Julie London.

 

Film is based on the 1942 novel by James H. Street, which is very loosely based on a debated event in Mississippi's history (Wikipedia has a long article on it; search "Newton Knight").

 

The convoluted plot begins in 1860 Mississippi.  Morna Dabney (Hayward) is trying to get her beau to marry her, as is Tishomingo (Karloff), a Choctaw Indian family friend.  Mornas' sister Aven (London) is also interested in her boyfriend.  Talk is of politics, and Mornas' father (Ward Bond),who owns the county, declares that if Mississippi secedes from the Union, his county will secede from the Confederacy.  Newspaper publisher Keith Alexander (Heflin) becomes involved.  The film proceeds from there.

 

Hayward is effective as a Temperamental Southern belle; she has the red hair to signify a Temper.  Only thing wrong is her accent comes and goes.  Van Heflin is very good as a quietly sarcastic Southerner; he and Hayward are the best things in the film.  Karloff is good as the Indian--he doesn't have the pronounced British accent he did in "Unconquered" (1947), where he played a similar role.  London is good as Haywards' treacherous vixen of a sister.

 

Universals' attempt at another "Gone With the Wind" came off pretty well.  Movie's weakness is there is too much resemblance to GWTW, down to the emphasis on landowning.  Still, it's an enjoyable watch. 3/4

 

Saw on another website.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

"Experiment Perilous" (1944)--Starring Hedy Lamarr, George Brent, and Paul Lukas.

 

Jacques Tourneur directed this RKO historical melodrama.  Film has a good cast, excellent director, atmospheric cinematography by Tony Gaudio, the money spent definitely shows on the screen.  What's wrong?  The wordy, SSSllloooowww script (blamed on Warren Duff) that is All talk and no action ( until the last twenty minutes), that echoes "Gaslight" (1944).  

 

Film's characters talk...and talk....and Talk.  When there's finally a confrontation between good and bad guys, they Yap...and yap before there's any action.  Director Tourneur and his cast do their utmost, but they can't totally redeem the script.  They Do make the film watchable and intermittently fascinating.  Gaudio's photography and the performances are better than the script deserves.  2.5/4.

And after they yapped and yapped they went to the stairs to have their fight!   I yelled, "No fighting on the stairs!" Heh. 

 

Good review, film lover.

 

I enjoyed it, but I love all the old melodramas, even the bad ones.  I do find it hard to watch Hedy in a film because I'm so busy admiring her amazing face I forget to listen to her dialogue.  Her nose alone is a work of art.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...