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Speedy

 

Remembering only dimly The Devil and Miss Jones but remembering what I can fondly. Jean Arthur and Coburn were both great. Arthur's voice IS nice, girlish and perhaps a bit kittenish in a mature way. Yes, the beach scene gets the award for the most claustrophobic in history. Sorry I can't remember more. There was cute scene when the two were having lunch together and she had something in her lunch bag that she offered him. He accepted and starting chomping. Who can tell me what it was? It was something like meatballs in nomenclature but I believe it was a dessert. Years ago there was a discussion here about this movie, and we were all chuckling about this scene.

 

Those were tuna popovers

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Those were tuna popovers

 

Thanks!

 

I was amused by that in the movie because when I was growing up the term never, uh, popped up. Maybe we just called them biscuits, although I sense that the generic biscuit is something completely different. I looked up popover and and even know why they are called such (but to my knowledge have never tasted one.) They seemed to be new to the Coburn character as well if I remember correctly.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Popover

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"Ruby Gentry" (1952)--Starring Jennifer Jones, Charlton Heston, and Karl Malden.

 

A wild, Southern Fried melodrama, with everyone trying to out--Southern everyone else.  Jones is the Southern wildcat, who literally flirts with Heston and then rakes her fingernails across his face.  She is from The Wrong Side of the Tracks, and as such, is fated never to be socially accepted.  

 

Heston is appropriately hateful as the hypocritical society boy who only sees Jones because she is "available".  

 

Malden is given the funniest dialogue and direction by King Vidor (I assume it was Vidor's directorial choice).  In the scene where Malden proposes to Jones, watch the prop.  Same meaning as the drill in "The Fountainhead" (1949).

 

Throw in a crazed religious fanatic as Jones' brother, a town full of citizens that hate her, shirts that are too small for Jones and consequently make her look as endowed up top as Marilyn Monroe, and you get the nuttiest melodrama of 1952.  RG is Great fun when watched in the correct mood.  3.3/4 

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I like most of the Ginger Roger movies that don't have Fred Astaire MORE.  Nothing against Astaire or the pairing of Astaire and Rogers.  I just think that she was quite good and played more interesting characters when she was on her own.

 

I used to think the opposite, I liked Rogers with Astaire more.  However, as I've seen more of her films, especially The Major and the Minor and Kitty Foyle, two very different films, I can see that Rogers had other talents aside from singing and dancing and I am really enjoying her work. 

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I watched East Side West Side for the first time this morning.  Great cast with lots of soapy goodness!  Barbara Stanwyck is excellent, of course, and I loved her scenes with Van Heflin, who always delivers a fine performance.  They had good chemistry together.  Ava Gardner is the bad girl and holds her own in a pivotal scene with Barbara.  Cyd Charisse is OK.  James Mason plays Barbara's husband who cannot stay away from Ava.  Nancy Davis (Reagan) is in it, too.  Gale Sondergaard plays Barbara's mom.  She has two scenes:  one where she is sitting and the other where she is in bed but it's not bedtime.  I wonder if she had some real-life health issues at the time.  The scene where she tells James Mason where to get off is well done.  Not a great film but entertaining take on life in New York circa 1950 with s e x and murder.

While I like Cyd Charisse, she's a fabulous dancer and seems to have more oomph than Esther Williams, I agree that she's not the strongest actress.  She's not really bad persay, it's just that I think she was a better dancer than actress.  When it comes to versatility, I don't think she quite had what Ginger Rogers and Rita Hayworth had. 

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Fedya said: John Garrick in Just Imagine becomes an astronaut, not an astronomer, something which makes a bit of sense considering that his character was a pilot doing the transatlantic route. I think the original real-life astronauts and cosmonauts were all fighter pilots. It's Frank Albertson joining him that's the surprise. El Brendel of course is just a stowaway. 

 

Did you see the 35mm screening of JUST IMAGINE this past Friday at CapitolFest? 

Sadly, I just couldn't stay up that late & missed it.

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*Movies generally got better with time, thankfully. Acting became more convincing, spoken dialog and situations became more realistic, colour became more naturalistic (although I do very much enjoy black and white), stories became much more honest in their presentations and conclusions*

 

 

I can go along with that to a degree.  Movies have always suffered the foibles of "business-like" thinking.  What made one movie successful should make ANY movie just as lucrative.

 

Not always the case however.  .But let's take a quick look at this line of thought----The public clamors to see a movie involving "gangsters", next you know, there's a glut of "gangster movies".  Westerns from various studios following the same formulas.  "I wanna be a STAR!" faux broadway/backstage story type flicks, "Gung Ho" war pictures, "B" level(or less) Sci-Fi pictures in the '50's (fun to watch, but not much "art" involved, OR convincing science)  Biker movies, Beach movies, "Hippie" movies, then on to Gangster movies again(GODFATHER, VALACHI PAPERS et al) , "cops and car chases" movies and now we're up to just about every other movie being ANIMATED, or 90% CGI Sci-Fi, and one can see your point.

 

Those old "classics" with some hack thespians speaking with British-like accents, and stuff.  Sure.  I get it.  "Classic" doesn't always MEAN classic.  most times it just means old.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Fedya said: John Garrick in Just Imagine becomes an astronaut, not an astronomer, something which makes a bit of sense considering that his character was a pilot doing the transatlantic route. I think the original real-life astronauts and cosmonauts were all fighter pilots. It's Frank Albertson joining him that's the surprise. El Brendel of course is just a stowaway. 

 

Did you see the 35mm screening of JUST IMAGINE this past Friday at CapitolFest? 

Sadly, I just couldn't stay up that late & missed it.

 

This is the SECOND time I have heard about a "35mm film" of Just Imagine floating around the film festivals.  I hope nothing happens to it.

 

When in the HELL are they going to restore the damn thing?!!  Or at least do a proper video release.

 

Just%20Imagine%20CapitolFest.jpg

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Murder on the Campus (1933)

 

Semi-interesting time-waster, with Charles Starrett as a reporter trying to figure out how a guy could be shot in a bell tower while no one is around. He ends up investigating another murder and an apparent suicide. Shirley Grey plays his romantic interest. Edward Van Sloan plays a criminologist; after all, he has plenty of experience killing vampires. As usual, the cops, led by J. Farrell MacDonald, are imbeciles, and Starrett has to solve the mystery for them. The ending is somewhat clever, although by then, I had figured out who the killer was – but not the method. As a bit of trivia, I had never seen Grey before, only to discover she was born not too far from where I live. MacDonald looks and sounds like William Frawley.

 

After being a university professor for forty years and spotting this title, I was hoping this film might involve a faculty member finally blowing his top and offing the entire administration. No such luck.

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"The Trouble With Harry" (1955)--Starring Shirley MacLaine, John Forsythe, Mildred Natwick, and Edmund Gwenn, directed by Alfred Hitchcock.

 

Harry's trouble is, he's dead--and multiple characters think they alone are responsible for his condition in this black comedy.  The film is set in Vermont, but the characters attitude is matter-of-fact, not hysterical or even upset.

 

The dialogue and the cast's delivery of it is priceless all through the film.  A few quotes:

 

The Captain (Gwenn) after he has discovered Harry and thinks he's responsible for Harrys demise: "Oh, Mother always said I'd come to no good end !"

 

Miss Gravely (Natwick), upon seeing the Captain dragging away Harrys' corpse: "Why Captain, whatever is the matter?"

 

Jennifer (MacLaine), after her five year old son Arnie (Jerry Mathers) has dragged her to see Harry: "Let's go home and I'll make you some nice lemonade"

 

One character explaining why they hit Harry: "I was annoyed.  Very annoyed !"

 

The screenwriter was John Michael Hayes.  The lovely photography was by Robert Burks.  The playful score was by Bernard Herrman.  This was his first film with Hitchcock.

 

The whole cast is excellent.  MacLaine, in her first film, is especially good, as is Natwick.

 

Criminally underrated film is hilarious at times, and is never less than amusing.  3.4/4.

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The Come On (1956) A Poverty Row Fish Story

 
 
1a82b58ea80f643065eb9aa94c63f36e.jpg


Director: Russell Birdwell (The Girl in the Kremlin (1957)), written by Whitman Chambers (novel & screenplay) Warren Douglas (screenplay). The film stars a nice compliment of Film Noir veterans, Anne Baxter (I Confess (1953), The Blue Gardenia (1953)), Sterling Hayden ( nine Classic Film Noir) , John Hoyt (The Unfaithful (1947), Brute Force (1947), The Bribe (1949),Trapped (1949), Loan Shark (1952), The Glass Cage (1964)) Alex Gerry (Whirlpool (1949),The Capture (1950), The Asphalt Jungle (1950), Between Midnight and Dawn (1950), The Breaking Point (1950), Deadline - U.S.A. (1952) ), and Jesse White (Kiss of Death (1947),Hell's Half Acre (1954)).

La Paz, Mexico. Rita Kendrick (Baxter) serious eye candy. Hot stuff. Swimsuit cheesecake. Bikini babe. Man bait. Exposed on a white sand beach. Dave Arnold (Hayden) is a big brute fisherman. Dave Eyeballs Rita. Falls in lust. Rita scopes Dave starring. She's cucumber cool. But things get heated when Hayden comes on hard. They share smokes, Hayden macho-ly nipping off the filter of his tar bar. Cancer scare, who gives a crap

 

Ann%2BBaxter%2BThe%2BCome%2BOn%2B1956.jp

Ann%2BBaxter%2B01%2BThe%2BCome%2BOn%2B19 Rita (Baxter)
Hayden gets frisky. Plants a kiss on Baxter's lips. Baxter fights a faux fight. Baxter is turned on. They make a 10PM date for later at the fish docks. Hayden's gill netter the "Lady Luck" is slated for their romantic hideaway. It ain't exactly a bouquet of roses, but hey this is a poverty row production.

The film has a nice patina of trashiness about it. It's cheap production values only help to enhance the entertainment value. This is Anne Baxter's film, she is a gorgeous, peroxide, femme fatale, and she plays it a bit over the top in a good entertaining sort of way. You gotta smile at her dated "granny pantie style, bikini bottoms. If you are in a noir frame of mind you buy the story, hook, line, and sinker, it's a fun film noir. Needs a restoration 6.5 to 7/10 Full review with screencaps here: http://noirsville.blogspot.com/2016/08/the-come-on-1956-poverty-row-fish-story.html
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"The Trouble With Harry" (1955)--Starring Shirley MacLaine, John Forsythe, Mildred Natwick, and Edmund Gwenn, directed by Alfred Hitchcock.

 

Harry's trouble is, he's dead--and multiple characters think they alone are responsible for his condition in this black comedy.  The film is set in Vermont, but the characters attitude is matter-of-fact, not hysterical or even upset.

 

The dialogue and the cast's delivery of it is priceless all through the film.  A few quotes:

 

The Captain (Gwenn) after he has discovered Harry and thinks he's responsible for Harrys demise: "Oh, Mother always said I'd come to no good end !"

 

Miss Gravely (Natwick), upon seeing the Captain dragging away Harrys' corpse: "Why Captain, whatever is the matter?"

 

Jennifer (MacLaine), after her five year old son Arnie (Jerry Mathers) has dragged her to see Harry: "Let's go home and I'll make you some nice lemonade"

 

One character explaining why they hit Harry: "I was annoyed.  Very annoyed !"

 

The screenwriter was John Michael Hayes.  The lovely photography was by Robert Burks.  The playful score was by Bernard Herrman.  This was his first film with Hitchcock.

 

The whole cast is excellent.  MacLaine, in her first film, is especially good, as is Natwick.

 

Criminally underrated film is hilarious at times, and is never less than amusing.  3.4/4.

 

Everything you said, and more. This is one of my favorites, but there are quite a few who don't care for it at all. It's a work of art on all fronts.

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Everything you said, and more. This is one of my favorites, but there are quite a few who don't care for it at all. It's a work of art on all fronts.

 

 

Yeah, that's me--To some, the dialogue is "clever", to me, it just sounded alien, forced and odd.

 

Any other director might be a little too preciously caught up in the black-comedy hidden-corpse concept, but Hitch just seems to be treating it with archness, none of the sheer twisted abandon that Frank Capra gave Cary Grant in "Arsenic and Old Lace".

In that one, Grant was the normal character we could sympathize, but there doesn't seem to be a single normal character in Harry.

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Yeah, that's me--To some, the dialogue is "clever", to me, it just sounded alien, forced and odd.

 

Any other director might be a little too preciously caught up in the black-comedy hidden-corpse concept, but Hitch just seems to be treating it with archness, none of the sheer twisted abandon that Frank Capra gave Cary Grant in "Arsenic and Old Lace".

In that one, Grant was the normal character we could sympathize, but there doesn't seem to be a single normal character in Harry.

 

Maybe they should have called it The Trouble with Everybody.

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"At Long Last Love" (1975)--Starring Burt Reynolds, Cybill Shepherd, Madeline Kahn, and Duilio del Prete.

 

I first saw this Peter Bogdanovich salute to 1930's musicals and Cole Porter in 1978 or '79, as a late night/early morning movie on television--the version that was released in theaters to almost universal critical wrath.  The version I just saw was longer, had more music, less talk and flowed better (the original was choppily edited), the order of songs was rearranged and three songs/ takes of songs had been edited out.

 

The missing songs are "It Ain't Etiquette" which was performed by Cybill Shepherd and Eileen Brennan (this one is on YouTube as a clip from ALLL); the version of "Tomorrow" where del Prete was Completely unintelligible (the version I saw was OK--barely); and Shepherd's version of "You're The Top" where she danced herself behind a curtain and had to beat her way back to the camera's view (the replacement version had her just singing).  Strengths of the version I just saw:

 

Madeline Kahn--She's the best singer in the movie, and has the most songs.  Whether singing or talking, she redeems her parts of an unfunny script, and her versions of "Find Me A Primitive Man" and "At Long Last Love" are classic.

 

Cybill Shepherd--She has a sweet, untrained voice (she has major trouble staying on key), but overall, she's a plus to the movie.

 

Eileen Brennan--as Shepherd's maid, she plays her role like it's a Pre-Code--she gets laughs out of thin air, and makes the most of the songs she's given.  Her takeoffs on Theda Bara and Pola Negri are very funny.

 

Laszlo Kovacs' cinematography is gorgeous and evokes certain movies and the 1930's as a romantic vision; it's a shame he wasn't even nominated for Best Cinematography.

 

Strengths and Weaknesses.  Reynolds is no singer, and he knows it.  He manages to talk-sing his way through his songs.  He relies on charm to get him through the movie, and gets by.

 

Choreography--It looks like an afterthought throughout the film.  In some instances it's charming--in others, it just looks strange.

 

del Prete--He does have a voice, but he also has a thick accent.  Problematic.

 

Main Weakness--The script.  Film credit says screenplay "based on the songs of Cole Porter".  There is a Huge gap between the wittiness of Porters' songs and the scripts' idea of wit.  After the reedit, film is rarely actually painful, mainly because there are now more songs than script.

 

After the re-editing job, ALLL has gone from a disaster to a film that's a pleasure to watch and listen to; there's never more than 5-7 minutes of talk between songs.  The re-edited ALLL--2.5/4.

 

Found on archivedotorg.

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"At Long Last Love" (1975)--Starring Burt Reynolds, Cybill Shepherd, Madeline Kahn, and Duilio del Prete.

 

Main Weakness--The script.  Film credit says screenplay "based on the songs of Cole Porter".  There is a Huge gap between the wittiness of Porters' songs and the scripts' idea of wit.  After the reedit, film is rarely actually painful, mainly because there are now more songs than script.

 

 

One of the funniest review lines I remembered (from the writeup in the Medveds' "Fifty Worst Films") was the critic who said that watching Burt Reynolds and Madeline Kahn interpret Cole Porter was "like listening to a tourist in a French restaurant read the menu in his loud Texas accent, pausing only to chuckle at his own cleverness".   :lol:

I agree much more with the latter--1974-75 had a very mythologized view of what "old 30's musicals" were like, and even with Bogdanovich's new craze for homaging what we thought 30's Movies were, this was the kind of thing that usually came out.

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FilmLover re: At Long Last Love: Main Weakness--The script.

 

I lurve Peter Bogdanovitch....but many of his later films lost his early taut editing and have silly rambling dialogue.

 

The only other artist I know who has fallen as far from early high brilliance to low suckatude is Rod Stewart. 

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I have actually read some pretty convincing arguments that put forward to the real reason for Bogdanovich's early successes was his wife and editor Polly Platt.

 

As is often the case, she was allegedly the brains of the operation. He ended up leaving her for Cybill Shepherd, and honestly he really hasn't done a fully successful or satisfying film since.

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FilmLover re: At Long Last Love: Main Weakness--The script.

 

I lurve Peter Bogdanovitch....but many of his later films lost his early taut editing and have silly rambling dialogue.

 

The only other artist I know who has fallen as far from early high brilliance to low suckatude is Rod Stewart. 

 

MY vote goes to MATTHEW McCONAUGHEY, who showed brilliance in early works like CONTACT and AMISTAD and possibly A TIME TO KILL and swirled down to uninspiring rom-coms and "chick-flick" dreck.

 

And now shills for Lincoln automobiles.

 

 

Sepiatone

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I watched more of THE CAINE MUTINY than I ought to have this morning. Boy, this one shows up on TCM a lot doesn't it? But there's a certain watchable quality to it, where I often find myself sitting down and paying attention to at least some of it.

 

It's basically a buffet of actors of the 19 fifties, with varying results of success. Although more items are appealing than not.

 

Even if it is a glorified supporting role, Bogart is terrific. I'm glad he got his third nomination for this, although there were so many other films he deserved one for. And Fred MacMurray is wonderful, another time where he plays a complete shitheel and comes off damn near being the MVP of the whole film.

 

On the opposite end of that Spectrum though is Van Johnson, who seems like an affable enough guy but as an actor?...no. and Jose Ferrer who seems like he was probably a complete pain in the **** to know and HAMS IT UP in this thing to a degree where I half expect him to end his big admonition scene near the end of the film with a pair of jazz hands.

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I watched more of THE CAINE MUTINY than I ought to have this morning. Boy, this one shows up on TCM a lot doesn't it? But there's a certain watchable quality to it, where I often find myself sitting down and paying attention to at least some of it.

 

It's basically a buffet of actors of the 19 fifties, with varying results of success. Although more items are appealing than not.

 

Even if it is a glorified supporting role, Bogart is terrific. I'm glad he got his third nomination for this, although there were so many other films he deserved one for. And Fred MacMurray is wonderful, another time where he plays a complete shitheel and comes off damn near being the MVP of the whole film.

 

On the opposite end of that Spectrum though is Van Johnson, who seems like an affable enough guy but as an actor?...no. and Jose Ferrer who seems like he was probably a complete pain in the **** to know and HAMS IT UP in this thing to a degree where I half expect him to end his big admonition scene near the end of the film with a pair of jazz hands.

With Claude Akins as Seaman "Horrible" ???

 

 

After the trial, Queeg retired and moved to L.A. - got an apartment across the court from Laurel Gray.

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Point Blank (1967) - Hard to talk about this one without revealing spoilers, so warnings about that right away. I'd seen the first half of this movie at least once before, up to the scene with the sniper (Doogie Howser's dad!) in the sewers, but this was my first time to make it all the way through. Since it was Angie Dickinson day, I was glad to see she returns in the second half of the film and plays a prominent part. The first time I saw it, she and Lee Marvin very casually say goodbye to each other after the penthouse scene, and it didn't appear as if her character would have any reason to return.

 

1967 was a good year for Lee Marvin at MGM, where he made two movies for the studio that have ended up in the 1,001 Movies You Must See Before You Die book, this one and The Dirty Dozen. This movie, I don't know ... John Boorman does some stylistically interesting things, but it's a bit too much, the flourishes calling too much attention to themselves and distracting from the story. He had become much more masterful at letting the visuals contribute to the advance of the story by the time he made Deliverance and Excalibur, IMO. These flashbacks Marvin/Walker kept having to events that had previously occurred in the movie - and in a movie that clocks in at under 95 minutes, at that - just seemed like overkill to me.

 

I found the plot terribly confusing. The crooks were hiding out in Alcatraz, where regular tours are conducted? Heck, Marvin himself is shown on such a tour very early in the film. I had no concept of what Marvin's life was supposed to have been before the events of the movie. In the flashback where he met his wife, he appears to be a dockworker straight out of On the Waterfront. The bit where the future marrieds circle each other, locked in eye contact was kinda sexy, but the presence of all of Marvin's coworkers standing one inch away from them was weird. I also didn't understand the connection between Walker and Reese or what this incredibly crowded party was where they reunited or the other barroom scene where Reese knocks Walker to the floor and climbs on top of him to tell him how badly he needs money. These scenes didn't make sense to me at all, but they didn't ruin my overall enjoyment of the movie.

 

I liked Carrol O'Connor as the Nicest Guy in the Mob. Keenan Wynn's character I didn't get. He somehow finds Walker when no one else knows he's alive and recruits him in pursuing mutual interests. I thought for the whole movie until the final scene that he was some kind of law enforcement - a Fed, maybe. The ending is also vague, I suppose deliberately so. Wynn tells the Hired Gun to leave the bag with the money, so I guess Walker gets the money? Though we don't see it explicitly.

 

Anyway, I just love the 60s look - the architecture, the cars, the hairstyles, the clothes. I loved the hamburger joint where Marvin and Dickinson ate with the giant windows. I loved her pad with the balcony that looked down on the living area. I loved O'Connor's sprawling retreat. I loved the technology! I guess mob millionaires had remote controls for their TVs in 1967 (Well, Jack Lemmon had one in The Apartment way back in 1960, and he was at best a middle-class schlub). My family didn't get its first remote control unit until 1978. It was a monumental, mind-blowing day in my childhood. It had two buttons, on/off and channel (the channels only went one way. If you were watching Channel 13 and wanted to see what was on Channel 5, you had to had to press the Channel button multiple times). You would hit the Channel button, and the knob on the TV would actually physically move, as if someone had moved it with their hands. Oh, yeah, I also dug O'Connor's primitive speaker phone, where he put the receiver in some kind of device so you suddenly had speaker phone.

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"The North Star" (1943)--Starring Anne Baxter, Walter Huston, and Farley Granger.

 

First, thanks to TomJH for his mention of a good print in the "TNS, Awful Print" thread.  The download on YouTube he specified was in excellent shape, not too faded to watch like the print TCM showed or the print I found on archivedotorg (to be fair, there are multiple prints on archive, and I didn't check Every one). There are some abrupt, awkward cuts, but other than that, download is in Good shape (TNS was nominated for six Oscars--Best Editing was Not among those six).

 

The movie is a stagy propaganda piece that paints life in 1941 rural Ukraine as idyllic--until the Nazis invade.  The film is about the Resistance to the Nazis.

 

There is a good script, but most of the actors stand and make speeches--Huston and Baxter avoid this pitfall (Baxter does make one speech direct to the camera).  Ann Harding, in a supporting role, has some lovely silent moments.  But  TNS is the sort of film you know what will happen to the characters by their dialogue.  When one character says to another "He's not the sort of man who kills", you know that the speaker is Doomed and will be killed by the person he is talking about.  When another character is told "You don't belong in this era" you know they are Doomed.

 

Film has an very good score by Aaron Copland, and has good special effects.

 

Film is an effective WW II morale booster and picture of its' time.  Since I saw a Good copy, 2.5/4.

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Did you see the 35mm screening of JUST IMAGINE this past Friday at CapitolFest?

No. I didn't know about it; I wouldn't have had the vacation time to take off work if I had known about it; and, I've got an elderly father to look after.
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Charles Starrett as a reporter trying to figure out how a guy could be shot in a bell tower while no one is around. He ends up investigating another murder and an apparent suicide.

So Vertigo minus the tedious psychological garbage.
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