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Still kind of watching BROADWAY THRU THE KEYHOLE...which has had its interesting moments...

 

But...

 

I know it's her SUTS day and all, so is it mean of me to point out that Constance Cummings just isn't particularly good at singing or acting?

 

(Or should I have waited till tomorrow?)

I believe Lucille Ball has an uncredited role in this film as a chorus girl.  I haven't seen the film, but I remember reading that in her autobiography.

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I believe Lucille Ball has an uncredited role in this film as a chorus girl.  I haven't seen the film, but I remember reading that in her autobiography.

Lucy was in one scene but it was on the beach with some lug talking to Russ & Constance. She and another woman were hanging out with the guy and she had one line. I read on imdb that the other woman was Ann Sothern but I didn't get a good look at her and she didn't have any lines. Lucy was a blonde.

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I did not notice. I was interested in seeing Russ Columbo, because he died mysteriously a year after this was made. But his duet with Constance was just AGONY.

 

I ended up going outside and piddling around in the yard and missed a fair portion of the rest of the film.

 

Edit: both Colombo and the other male lead, whose name I forget and who I don't remember from anything else, were very very handsome. And not bad actors either...

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I did not notice. I was interested in seeing Russ Columbo, because he died mysteriously a year after this was made. But his duet with Constance was just AGONY.

I ended up going outside and piddling around in the yard and missed a fair portion of the rest of the film.

Edit: both Colombo and the other male lead, whose name I forget and who I don't remember from anything else, were very very handsome. And not bad actors either...

The other lead, Frank Rocci, was played by Paul Kelly, who was in a bunch of movies starting as a child actor and did time for manslaughter in the mid 20's.

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The other lead, Frank Rocci, was played by Paul Kelly, who was in a bunch of movies starting as a child actor and did time for manslaughter in the mid 20's.

 

!

 

Yes that was him, thank you, I had forgotten the name.

 

I also did not know that about his biography, thank you!

 

He was verrrrry sexy, and seemed the type that I could see him being a bad boy in real life.

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I did not notice. I was interested in seeing Russ Columbo, because he died mysteriously a year after this was made. But his duet with Constance was just AGONY.

 

I ended up going outside and piddling around in the yard and missed a fair portion of the rest of the film.

 

Edit: both Colombo and the other male lead, whose name I forget and who I don't remember from anything else, were very very handsome. And not bad actors either...

 

Wow! Did you read how he died? 

 

From imdb:

 

"The circumstances of Russ Columbo's sudden death, if true, constitute one of the most freakish freak accidents ever brought to popular attention. The story as it is most frequently given runs thus: Columbo was visiting the studio of a photographer friend when the friend, in lighting a cigarette, lit the match by striking it against the wooden stock of an antique French dueling pistol. The flame set off a long-forgotten charge in the gun, and a lead pistol ball was fired. The pistol ball ricocheted off a nearby table and hit Columbo in the forehead, killing him almost instantly. All this took place in about ten seconds."

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Yes, that is a strange story...

 

I have since thrown it out, but I had a book that went into detail about celebrity deaths. The entry for Columbo speculated that that may not have been the full story and he might in fact have been murdered by a jealous boyfriend or criminal associate.

 

(He dated Carole Lombard for a while also.)

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Yes, that is a strange story...

 

I have since thrown it out, but I had a book that went into detail about celebrity deaths. The entry for Columbo speculated that that may not have been the full story and he might in fact have been murdered by a jealous boyfriend or criminal associate.

 

(He dated Carole Lombard for a while also.)

The details surrounding strange celebrity deaths always fascinate me, in a morbid way.  

 

Have you read how Albert Dekker died? Yikes!

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     Texas Guinan was another interesting actress in this film who died tragically.

She had quite a career in vaudeville, theater and silent films. She was also an owner

and hostess of numerous speakeasies during prohibition.  She died just days after the release

of "Broadway Thru A Keyhole" from amoebic dysentery that she caught in Chicago while doing

a revue on the road. This was her only surviving talkie.

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Yes, that is a strange story...

 

I have since thrown it out, but I had a book that went into detail about celebrity deaths. The entry for Columbo speculated that that may not have been the full story and he might in fact have been murdered by a jealous boyfriend or criminal associate.

 

(He dated Carole Lombard for a while also.)

 

     I highly doubt these various conspiracies. All they do is make for a more interesting, sensationalized demise that readers tend to eat up.

In the past few years I've read two well researched biographies on Russ and both told of the freak accident as the reason for his

tragic death.

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PERSUASION (1995) was on last night, and it was perfectly timed. I'm glad TCM shows this from time to time, even though it's "modern" and apparently was a TV movie, not strictly a theatrical release.

 

Done on a budget of nothing, & with no score- it would have been so easy for this to not work- but it does. It's one of those films that you have to kind of be the "Anne Elliot" of your family to get - and by that I mean the "spinster aunt" who is always drafted for babysitting, watching the house, and cleaning out the spare room because we all know " what else do you have to do?"

 

A wonderfully directed film' which coincidentally really is based on the best book Jane Austen ever wrote ( her deepest, most intimate, most thoroughly thought-out work.)

 

"Nothing happens" in this movie, and yet so very much is going on at every minute and there is not a Superfluous or unnecessary moment in the whole thing.

 

The first shot of Amanda Root was shocking. How could they choose an ugly ducking like that as heroine? It eventually revealed itself. There were making her that way to show her depressed state, which was not without cause. I was tempted to go through the film and record the times she gets verbally put down by family and friends. But I lost patience. Not that she is that bad of course, it's just the time and circumstance and she's just 27 years old and unmarried and perilously headed for full-fledged spinsterhood. Persona non grata in this vicious times. She is not really an ugly duckling as we see later when things are looking up a bit. And her unhappiness was not because of the put downs after all, she actually bore those quite well. It's just that she had been PERSUADED not to marry (not a spoiler) a certain Captain Wentworth (played by Claren Hines) who was not a fit husband for the high borns---at the time, seven years prior. But now ... ??

 

The look of Elizabeth Eliot's (sister), (played by Phoebe Nicholls) prune face and her vaguely sort of pretty but unpleasant countenance made me think immediately of one of the unprepossessing sisters in Cinderella and soon was seized with the sort of fantastical notion that the movie itself might be a kind Cinderella story. I could elaborate on that a little but that would involve spoilers.

 

Often for me there is a little dark sleeper candidate (always a woman) for special consideration that for anyone else would be a ho-mummer but for me jumps out like a big fat wonderful cherry. In this film it takes the form of Sophie Thompson playing yet a third sister named Mary Mulgrove (nee Eliot, of course) who is a smash hit for me. I adore her. It doesn't matter that she has some unsavory character traits. She is an hypochondriac (feigning perhaps), a fussbudget, and at times an out and out manipulator. But alas, laffite, in his delirium can see through all that and the innocence of this charmer (you have to look closely like I can) comes through in a delectable way-----for me.

 

Captain Wentworth is played by Claren Hines who almost doesn't make if for me. He has a halting way of speaking and a sometime facial irregularity that is very evident in later films but only partially visible here. It's not a trait that would facilitate the dashing to-die-for Tyrone Power -looking heart throb (which is what Captain Wentworth is). Incidentally, Claren Hines was SUPERB in an earlier BBC Production of The Mayor of Casterbridge and is I'm sure the absolute definitive Richard Henshaw. I can't conceive of anyone doing it better. The halting speech and the tic-y face eruptions are 100% Henshaw.

 

One of the major themes of the story (an aspect of love) is brilliantly dramatized (in that particularly reserved way of the English) that brings everything to a ..... (spoilers avoided).

 

Lorna, I referenced your fine mini capsule review above because as I said in a post just subsequent to it I was bestirred to rent from netflix and view the film myself (after reading what you wrote). I did that and liked it so much I bought a copy for cheap from eBay. I wanted to do some caps but too tired right now, dammit!

 

:blink:

 

==

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Lucy was in one scene but it was on the beach with some lug talking to Russ & Constance. She and another woman were hanging out with the guy and she had one line. I read on imdb that the other woman was Ann Sothern but I didn't get a good look at her and she didn't have any lines. Lucy was a blonde.

 

On her credits page, it says Chorine (uncredited) for Broadway Thru a Keyhole. Amazing that whatever tiny role she had in this film, she was the lead actress opposite Edmund Lowe in Let's Fall in Love (It's been on TCM a few times) the very same year!

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I did not notice. I was interested in seeing Russ Columbo, because he died mysteriously a year after this was made. But his duet with Constance was just AGONY.

 

I ended up going outside and piddling around in the yard and missed a fair portion of the rest of the film.

 

Edit: both Colombo and the other male lead, whose name I forget and who I don't remember from anything else, were very very handsome. And not bad actors either...

 

Gee, I thought it was a pretty decent duet, very natural...

I read that after Columbo died , his family kept the info from his elderly mother for the rest of her life. Just said that he was on the road, touring overseas......

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I came in very late on ATTORNEY FOR THE DEFENSE.  At the part where some supposedly great lawyer quoted his retainer for some case as $50,000.  WOW!  In 1932???

 

Hell, I remember an article about the 1979 movie KRAMER VS. KRAMER in which a few local attorney's claimed HOWARD DUFF's lawyer character's saying the Dad's custody suit would cost that much was "outrageously unrealistic".

 

 

Sepiatone

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I don't know if it's just me, but does anyone else feel like Edmund Lowe could pass as a Doppleganger for William Daniels?  Not just in looks, but in sound too.  After watching "Attorney for the Defense" and "Doomed Cargo", I found myself closing my eyes and saying, "Yep, he could have played John Adams in 1776 or the voice of KIT on Knight Rider"!

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"Mr. Bug Goes to Town" (1941)--The version I saw was titled "Bugville", from a 1989 Legend DVD release (I Think--it has a sloppily prepared title card and matches the Wikipedia description, and the promo video TCM has is of the beginning of MBGtT is an exact match, excepting the title card).  

 

OK Fleischer/Paramount animated feature (Fleischer made the animated 1939 "Gulliver's Travels) about bugs endangered by man has a listenable score by Frank Loesser, very good opening and closing sequences, and a good nightclub scene (watch for the Jitterbug).  Film has too many lulls between the interesting scenes, and in general is cloyingly sweet.  Film is a disappointment.

 

This is the one that was released two days before Pearl Harbor.  Thanks at least partially to bad timing, film was a financial disaster.  Film is hard to find, so is worth a watch.  Just have a pot of coffee close by.  2.3/4.

 

Edit: Found on Archivedotorg.

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Gee, I thought it was a pretty decent duet, very natural...

I read that after Columbo died , his family kept the info from his elderly mother for the rest of her life. Just said that he was on the road, touring overseas......

 

Columbo was fine, and I was very impressed by his earlier violin playing...It was Cummings I took issue with.

 

(and yes, i remember reading that about his mother.)

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     I highly doubt these various conspiracies. All they do is make for a more interesting, sensationalized demise that readers tend to eat up.

In the past few years I've read two well researched biographies on Russ and both told of the freak accident as the reason for his

tragic death.

 

I stand humbled and corrected.

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     Texas Guinan was another interesting actress in this film who died tragically.

She had quite a career in vaudeville, theater and silent films. She was also an owner

and hostess of numerous speakeasies during prohibition.  She died just days after the release

of "Broadway Thru A Keyhole" from amoebic dysentery that she caught in Chicago while doing

a revue on the road. This was her only surviving talkie.

 

Fascinating.

 

It would be a very interesting, if slightly morbid, night of programming if TCM scheduled a bunch of films wherein quite a few of the players died within 10 years (or less) after the release.

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Fascinating.

 

It would be a very interesting, if slightly morbid, night of programming if TCM scheduled a bunch of films wherein quite a few of the players died within 10 years (or less) after the release.

 

I thought the same idea. Morbid but intriguing. Off the top of my head I think of "Dinner At Eight". Made in 1933 several cast members died within 10 years. There was Marie Dressler (died 1934), Louise Closser Hale (died 1933), Jean Harlow (died 1937), John Barrymore (died 1942), Phillips Holmes (died 1942) and  May Robson (died 1942).

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Fascinating.

 

It would be a very interesting, if slightly morbid, night of programming if TCM scheduled a bunch of films wherein quite a few of the players died within 10 years (or less) after the release.

You're right LornaHF, it would be morbid, and unfortunately, there are plenty of possibilities out there to dedicate more than one night of programming to such a project.  All too often we think of Hollywood's most popular stars and power brokers behind the scenes (or anyone else who has achieved fame and notoriety, for that matter) as super extraordinary people who were larger than life.  In truth, away from the limelight, they were fairly ordinary people who performed the daily and mundane tasks everyone does to earn a living and live life as close to their own terms as possible.  The bizarre or tragic circumstances of their deaths, particularly at a young age always carries a "what if" factor to whether or not they would have maintained or improved their status as an icon in the public's eye (for better or for worse).

 

I had never seen "It's Love I'm After" during the Bette Davis SUTS day.  I found it to be quite enjoyable.  Leslie Howard in a comic role while not playing in a period piece was a revelation to me.  It would have been interesting to see how his career as an actor or director would have matriculated had he not met his unfortunate end in 1943.

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I thought the same idea. Morbid but intriguing. Off the top of my head I think of "Dinner At Eight". Made in 1933 several cast members died within 10 years. There was Marie Dressler (died 1934), Louise Closser Hale (died 1933), Jean Harlow (died 1937), John Barrymore (died 1942), Phillips Holmes (died 1942) and  May Robson (died 1942).

 

and THE MISFITS (1961.)

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I also enjoyed NIGHT AFTER NIGHT, Mae West and her Marie Dressleresque companion STOLE THE PICTURE, (especially the scene where the woman quite clearly thinks Mae's oft-mentioned "business"- to which Mae invites her to join- is being a prostitute and she goes on extolling the virtues of "such women, who aid the domesticity of the home and therefore free time for household matters to be attended to..." so as not to offend Mae.)

 

It also dispelled that Myth dropped here and there that Mae West was secretly a man- that was a RACK she was sporting SANS BRA and in rather sheer and alluringly plunging satin for most of the movie. THOSE WERE REAL.

 

It was also interesting to see Raft so young- still an awful actor, but with the dew of youth about him (someone really liked to put him in black Nehru jackets back in the day, huh?)

 

I also enjoyed Iris- the DEEEEEEEEEERANGED ex-girlfriend of Raft's who- for some reason utterly intangible to me- wants him back and is will to KILL TO GET HIM.

 

Once again: a woman in a film was willing to kill in order to "win" the "affections" of George Raft....hard to believe, I know.

 

It was one of those interesting films that come along periodically from the Golden Era where the leads are dull as dishwater, BUT EVERYONE ELSE IN THE PICTURE IS PUTTING IN  110% to get the finished result "over the plate" with the audience.

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The details surrounding strange celebrity deaths always fascinate me, in a morbid way.  

 

Have you read how Albert Dekker died? Yikes!

Oh yeah.

And sadly, it's kind of ALWAYS on my mind whenever I see him in something.

Politicians. They're all the same..

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