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Janet said about Lon Chaney Jr: But it's just a shame that he didn't go on to be a powerful leading man in the movies.

 

Boy, do I agree with THAT!

 

I find Creighton Chaney an appealing big lug of a guy, not unlike Jack Carson. While Creighton was never "smart alecky" like Carson, he instead projected a gentle, deep, passionate heart that somehow comes through when on screen.

 

Obviously, he learned this from his Dad, or maybe it was just natural, in his DNA.

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Janet said about Lon Chaney Jr: But it's just a shame that he didn't go on to be a powerful leading man in the movies.

 

Boy, do I agree with THAT!

 

I find Creighton Chaney an appealing big lug of a guy, not unlike Jack Carson. While Creighton was never "smart alecky" like Carson, he instead projected a gentle, deep, passionate heart that somehow comes through when on screen.

 

Obviously, he learned this from his Dad, or maybe it was just natural, in his DNA.

 

Well, I've dated many a lug in my day. I just thought that Chaney, Jr did a nice love scene. I've always loved that scene. You know? Gwen offers him a penny in return for the pentagram necklace and he says, "It isn't enough". For the types of roles that junior got and played at Universal, it's damn good.

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I find Creighton Chaney an appealing big lug of a guy, not unlike Jack Carson. While Creighton was never "smart alecky" like Carson, he instead projected a gentle, deep, passionate heart that somehow comes through when on screen.

 

 

I feel that way about him, as well. For what it's worth, I think he was an attractive man. I also think E.G. Robinson was. I didn't say I thought they were handsome, but attractive. You know who I think of as handsome? Eli Wallach. 

Am I alone here?

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He Got Game (1998)

 

I admit that I approached this film, not knowing much about it, with low expectations, afraid it might be a sports movie (not my favourite film genre). What I saw, however, was an emotionally involving, at times powerful, study of the contentious relationship between a father and his son.

 

Written and directed by Spike Lee, basketball plays a key lynch pin in this relationship but the film is not about the sport, per se. Ray Allen plays a basketball high school player who is the nation's top recruit (he's already a star in his neighbourhood) who must choose which university he will attend (and they all want him).

 

But Allen is also a mature young man who has raised his young sister by himself after his father is sent to prison for the death of his mother. The father, played by Denzel Washington, receives an offer from the state governor, a basketball fanatic, to shorten his sentence if he can convince his son to go to the governor's alma mater.

 

Washington is released (with two tough security personnel watching his every move) back into society for one week in an attempt to influence his son's decision. The problem, though, is that the son wants nothing to do with the father following the death of his mother.

 

The sensitivity and intelligence of the film's screenplay makes for an involving film of human emotions. But the film also shows the leeches, exploiters and temptations that can surround a star athlete, even so emotionally grounded a one as that played by Allen here. Allen, by the way, is an NBA player who can really act in a completely convincing portrayal.

 

Milla Jovovich also appears as a pimp abused hooker to whom Washington extends a sympathetic hand.

 

Washington delivers a beautifully controlled understated performance, the power of his emotions just beneath the surface. One of the film's most memorable scenes is that in which the emotionally stoic father visits the grave of his wife for the first time in years. In just a few seconds of screen time Spike Lee powerfully conveys the depth of this man's true feelings for his wife.

 

It's a long film at well over two hours, perhaps my chief grievance with it. Nevertheless, I would highly recommend He Got Game as strong dramatic fare. The on location shooting (Chicago, I believe) brings great credibility to the tale.

 

This is the most recent in a series of Denzel Washington films I have viewed for the first time. I was not disappointed. He's an actor who continues to supply me with unyielding treasures, some big, some small, when viewing his performances.

 

HeGotGame.jpg

 

3 out of 4.

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Glengarry Glen Ross (1992)

 

Four real-estate agents for property developers (Jack Lemmon, Al Pacino, Ed Harris, and Alan Arkin) are given an ultimatum by their boss (Kevin Spacey, accompanied by motivator Alec Baldwin): whoever has the most in closings this month gets a new Cadillac; whoever closes the least gets fired. Of course, the agents are given lousy leads; they'll only get the good leads if they can close deals.

 

Ed Harris gets the idea to burgle the office and steal the leads; everybody swears their way through the movie as they try all sorts of underhanded tactics to close deals of one sort or another.

 

The performances are uniformly excellent, but with the exception of a supporting role by Jonathan Pryce, every single one of them is loathsome. I think I mentioned Under the Volcano earlier in this thread, and I was thinking about that movie a lot as I watched Glengarry Glen Ross: it's hard to watch when everybody is such a horrible human being. At least the protagonists in the Maysles' documentary Salesman all had a human side.

 

9/10, if you're prepared to watch a bunch of unremittingly repulsive people.

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Tom, I omitted He Got Game from my list of recommended Washington films because I wasn't sure if you would enjoy it due to the sports milieu. It goes to show that I should not judge what someone else will like. I like all of the films he's made with Spike Lee, even the frequently maligned Mo' Better Blues.

 

Fedya, Glengarry Glen Ross is one of my favorite stage-to-film adaptations. Even though it retains the stagebound quality, it works in this film, and maybe even enhances it due to the claustrophobic feel. Alec Baldwin's speech scene is one of the best small roles I've ever seen. He completely owns the screen for his short time there, and it changed the direction of his career. But I think everyone was terrific. It was the first time I paid attention to Kevin Spacey ("Will you...go...to...lunch?"), and Ed Harris has rarely been better. Alan Arkin's disbelief that someone would steal the telephones. And while Pacino got the Oscar nod for the movie (his dressing-down of Spacey is hilariously profane), many thought Lemmon would get another Oscar for his role.

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Glengarry Glen Ross (1992)

 

Four real-estate agents for property developers (Jack Lemmon, Al Pacino, Ed Harris, and Alan Arkin) are given an ultimatum by their boss (Kevin Spacey, accompanied by motivator Alec Baldwin): whoever has the most in closings this month gets a new Cadillac; whoever closes the least gets fired. Of course, the agents are given lousy leads; they'll only get the good leads if they can close deals.

 

Ed Harris gets the idea to burgle the office and steal the leads; everybody swears their way through the movie as they try all sorts of underhanded tactics to close deals of one sort or another.

 

The performances are uniformly excellent, but with the exception of a supporting role by Jonathan Pryce, every single one of them is loathsome. I think I mentioned Under the Volcano earlier in this thread, and I was thinking about that movie a lot as I watched Glengarry Glen Ross: it's hard to watch when everybody is such a horrible human being. At least the protagonists in the Maysles' documentary Salesman all had a human side.

 

9/10, if you're prepared to watch a bunch of unremittingly repulsive people.

 

I like your review, although the unremittingly repulsive thing is really just Sales. Should hear my father-in-law talk - he's been in Sales for his entire life. Dog eat dog is putting it kindly.

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IIRC, Lon Chaney Jr. had a bad alcohol problem that got worse, as these things do.

 

I received an autographed card from Chaney in 1966, seven years before his death. As a young teen, I was ecstatic to receive it, having grown up on his Wolf Man and Mummy films.

 

In retrospect, I'm a bit amazed that, despite the man's severe alcoholism at the time, he had a beautifully legible signature, very close to that of his father.

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Rage (1966) Directed by Gilberto Gazcón, it stars Glenn Ford, Stella Stevens, David Reynoso and Armando Silvestre, an interesting Mexican film about a doctor who gets bit by a rabid dog, drags a bit at times, but Stella provides a lot of eye candy, 6.5/10

 

Rage%2066_zps8iylkg0g.jpg

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"The Outlaw and His Wife" (1918) Directv program guide says 1917.

 

Nice film that has a sad ending.  My only problem is the modern interpretation of the crime calling it petty.  This was a time period of hand to mouth survival, every animal a person owns made a difference between food / milk on the table and starving.  Stealing a sheep is far from petty!  Even during the 19th century in the United States the horse was a matter of survival which made stealing one a capital offense.

 

Oh, love the old excuse for trying to kiss Hala on the lips "the devil made me do it".  Man that old line never changes, lol!

 

This site has the best commentary.

 

http://www.silentfilm.org/the-outlaw-and-his-wife

 

 

Swedish poster

 

220px-Berg-Ejvind_och_hans_hustru_1918_f

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"The Outlaw and His Wife" (1918) Directv program guide says 1917.

 

Nice film that has a sad ending.  My only problem is the modern interpretation of the crime calling it petty.  This was a time period of hand to mouth survival, every animal a person owns made a difference between food / milk on the table and starving.  Stealing a sheep is far from petty!  Even during the 19th century in the United States the horse was a matter of survival which made stealing one a capital offense.

 

Dang, I really wanted to watch this, but I forgot it was airing. I was even watching The Effect Of Gamma Rays... which was on right before it! How absent-minded is that? ;(

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I hope no one minds....

 

I just want to say, the "review" posts in this thread have been most enjoyable. Most every contribution is easy to read & one can enjoy the insights. No big egos, no snarky. The thread can take off topic comments here & there but still manages to stay on track for the most part. I've been inspired to seek out some of the mentioned titles & enjoyed them as well.

 

An excellent example of a movie message board at it's best!

Thank all who contribute!

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Dang, I really wanted to watch this, but I forgot it was airing. I was even watching The Effect Of Gamma Rays... which was on right before it! How absent-minded is that? ;(

 

The Effect of Betty The Loon on people? :lol:

 

Can't believe that weird thing became such a famous stage play! :blink:

220px-MarigoldsPoster.jpg

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TCM aired an old, old copy of "The Outlaw and his Wife" (1917) last night that has the wrong, much faster film speed, resulting in everything moving a lot faster than intended, including title cards that don't stay on the screen long enough for you to read.  In 2008, Kino released a DVD that used the same print with the same speed (and same running time), but with improved readability for the title cards.

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I received an autographed card from Chaney in 1966, seven years before his death. As a young teen, I was ecstatic to receive it, having grown up on his Wolf Man and Mummy films.

 

In retrospect, I'm a bit amazed that, despite the man's severe alcoholism at the time, he had a beautifully legible signature, very close to that of his father.

 

I just figured out how to post the autographed card.

 

aa6d197c-9a69-4fa1-bbf6-0766dfcdf074_zps

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TCM aired an old, old copy of "The Outlaw and his Wife" (1917) last night that has the wrong, much faster film speed, resulting in everything moving a lot faster than intended, including title cards that don't stay on the screen long enough for you to read.  In 2008, Kino released a DVD that used the same print with the same speed (and same running time), but with improved readability for the title cards.

 

Since the film was made in 1918, it  had a lower frame speed.  Early silents had a frame rate varying from 16 to 26 fps.  Sound has the standardized 24 fps.

 

Ever ran the old home 8mm at a low speed just to make it last longer?

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Since the film was made in 1918, it  had a lower frame speed.  Early silents had a frame rate varying from 16 to 26 fps.  Sound has the standardized 24 fps.

 

Ever ran the old home 8mm at a low speed just to make it last longer?

 

My point was that since an improved version with more readable subtitles was already available, TCM probably should have obtained and aired the improved version instead.  TCM has obtained and aired many of Kino's improved versions of silent films, e.g. Metropolis, so I don't know why the same wasn't done for "The Outlaw and His Wife."  This film's title cards happen to be pretty verbose, so you would really need to be a speed reader to watch last night's airing.

 

Btw, last night's airing came from a print that is over 3 decades old.  It came from the 1986 restoration by Swedish Film Institute, and it was released on VHS and laserdisc by Kino back then.

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The Effect of Betty The Loon on people? :lol:

 

Can't believe that weird thing became such a famous stage play! :blink:

It was strange! I felt let down by the ending. I wanted this family to better themselves ( outside of Mathilda's newly found confidence. )

I wanted Betty and Ruth to be kind to Grannie Annie. I wanted Betty to have some respect for Mathilda's geekiness. I didn't want the damn rabbit to die. Just left me dissatisfied...

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"Horrors of the Black Museum" (1959)--Starring Michael Gough, June Cunningham, and Shirley Field.

 

Okay British/U.S. horror movie where a bestselling author hypnotizes a helper into committing various gruesome murders the author then writes about.  Movie tips its' hand as to who the murderer is about ten minutes into the movie, and from there the plot is guessable.  The fun is in seeing what movies the film borrows its' plot from, and the various ways the unsympathetic characters are bumped off.

 

Film is generally well acted, although Cunningham's whispery attempts at imitating Marilyn Monroe don't work, and Gough has a tendency to put vocal exclamation marks around important lines.  The ending is abrupt.

 

Print I saw was minus the thirteen minute prologue about hypnosis the film had on original release.

 

2.4/4.

 

Source--archive.org.  Search "hoftbm".  Should bring up one result that was archived October 27, 2016.

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I watched "The Effects of Gamma Rays on Man-In-The-Moon Marigolds" and I enjoyed it to a certain extent.  Not exactly the kind of movie that motivates one to watch it repeatedly, though, is it?  I think it's definitely an acquired taste.  I know no one else in my family would enjoy it no matter how well-acted it is.  I liked it all right and I would watch it again sometime.  But not right away!  Maybe if TCM airs it again in 2019 I'd be up for another viewing.      

 

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It was strange! I felt let down by the ending. I wanted this family to better themselves ( outside of Mathilda's newly found confidence. )

I wanted Betty and Ruth to be kind to Grannie Annie. I wanted Betty to have some respect for Mathilda's geekiness. I didn't want the damn rabbit to die. Just left me dissatisfied...

 

I thought the ending was hopeful enough. You cant expect a happy ending for characters like this.

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I watched "The Effects of Gamma Rays on Man-In-The-Moon Marigolds" and I enjoyed it to a certain extent.  Not exactly the kind of movie that motivates one to watch it repeatedly, though, is it?  I think it's definitely an acquired taste.  I know no one else in my family would enjoy it no matter how well-acted it is.  I liked it all right and I would watch it again sometime.  But not right away!  Maybe if TCM airs it again in 2019 I'd be up for another viewing.      

 

It's a downer, but I am moved when I watch it. Well acted, funny and sad. Woodward cant shake entirely her likeability underneath, but she does a good job. Nell Potts (Newman) is wonderful as the younger daughter. And Judith Lowery says more in a look than lines of dialogue.

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Song of Bernadette - A moving and haunting film. I just re-watched a fabulous film I had taped in 1986! (The commercials are within the film. As long as they are brief I do not mind. Kind of fun to see what year it was - "Get your Dodge Vans at 1986 prices!" It was the end of the year). But I am spoiled by our wonderful TCM. Frankly, it was irritating to sit through The Federated Group's three minute commercial selling electronic equipment -- and demonstrating the sale cut in half by splitting it with an axe! And then Ajax no wax floor cleaner, etc. Just when we think the film is coming back on, there is just one more ad. I remember those days as a kid, the Cal Worthington Doge ads, etc.

For those that have seen the film I will just say that Jennifer Jones was superb as Bernadette Soubrious who saw and heard a vision in the grotto in Lourdes. Throughout the film there are excellent supporting performances; by the great Gladys Cooper, one of the presiding nuns at her school who doubts her story, and Charles Bickford, a skeptical high priest who begins to believe in Bernadette. Little by little the villagers begin to see evidence of the miracle. Holy water flows from an unknown spring, a blind man washes in it and his sight is restored. Vincent Price is excellent as the prefect of police who declares Bernadette is insane or drawing attention to herself. Throughout the film we see so many wonderful choices for the roles. Ann Revere is excellent as Bernadette's mother who feels conflicted. At the denouement of the film a unique event occurs, which may strengthen Bernadette's story. For those that have not seen it, I will not spoil it.

 

 

One other superb aspect of the film is the beautiful and haunting musical score by Alfred Newman.

I give this great film a score of 10+.

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I just figured out how to post the autographed card.

 

aa6d197c-9a69-4fa1-bbf6-0766dfcdf074_zps

I am still in awe of the late Lon Chaney, Jr. His unforgettable performance in The Wolf Man and man other films is very riveting. That is surprising that he still had great handwriting after being a severe alcoholic. He left behind a great legacy of special horror films.

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