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Since the film was made in 1918, it  had a lower frame speed.  Early silents had a frame rate varying from 16 to 26 fps.  Sound has the standardized 24 fps.

 

Ever ran the old home 8mm at a low speed just to make it last longer?

I know what you mean about the frame rate of speed. When I was a young kid in the 60's, we had a show called Fractured Flickers narrated at times by Hans Conried. I remember my dad saying that the Silent films weren't all slapstick and meant to be at fast speeds. At the time they did not have the equipment to enable them to show these films on TV at the right rate of speed. Today we are lucky that most of them are shown at the right frame rate like Lorna Doone, '22 and Cat and The Canary '27. My dad loved Silent films and remembered the serious ones as well as the comedies with Charlie Chaplin.

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I know what you mean about the frame rate of speed. When I was a young kid in the 60's, we had a show called Fractured Flickers narrated at times by Hans Conried. I remember my dad saying that the Silent films weren't all slapstick and meant to be at fast speeds. At the time they did not have the equipment to enable them to show these films on TV at the right rate of speed. Today we are lucky that most of them are shown at the right frame rate like Lorna Doone, '22 and Cat and The Canary '27. My dad loved Silent films and remembered the serious ones as well as the comedies with Charlie Chaplin.

 

I have a Bell and Howell  1950's Filmosound 16mm projector, it has a speed selector that allows one to watch silent and sound films at the proper speed.

 

 

The toggle speed selector is on the right (left is Foward / Reverse) located at the black base of the lamp.  Very slight cosmetic difference.

 

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I have a Bell and Howell  1950's Filmosound 16mm projector, it has a speed selector that allows one to watch silent and sound films at the proper speed.

 

 

The toggle speed selector is on the right (left is Foward / Reverse) located at the black base of the lamp.  Very slight cosmetic difference.

 

maxresdefault.jpg

 

 

 

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That is really neat! It sounds like they could be watched on the projector. It is great that the frame rate was later resolved for TV viewing too.

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I just watched Brute Force (1947). It had been on my DVR for months and I finally got around to watching it. That Munsey character is downrigt psychotic. Definitely got the Hitleresque vibes from him (His uniform, the music he plays). Burt Lancaster was good too. I kept getting reminded of his Hunsecker character in Sweet Smell of Success. It's the eyes. Can't believe this movie didn't get nominated for an Oscar. Not one! Too violent for you, Academy? What a bunch of weenies.

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I just watched Dead Ringer again--it's one of the Bette Davis Baby Jane resurgence movies. Unlike A Stolen Life, where Bette also played twins, it's not a good movie.

 

However, it does have something that you cannot take your eyes off of--Miss Davis, the consummate professional, carrying a mediocre movie and making you totally involved and believing in a plot that is somewhat ridiculous.

 

And if you're not a hopless Bette Davis fan, like I am, at least you should watch this movie just to see the scene where Peter Lawford is "eaten" by a very large Great Dane. Perhaps the producer felt they had to have something reminiscent of the horror of Baby Jane to keep the audience interested. Unfortunately it's the most memorable scene in the movie.

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The Friends Of Eddie Coyle (1973) New England Neo Noir

 

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With friends like these you don't need enemies. Directed by Peter Yates (Bullitt (1968)). Screenplay by Paul Monash based on the book by George V. Higgins. Cinematography by Victor J. Kemper and Music by Dave Grusin (The Long Goodbye (1973), The Nickel Ride (1974), Mulholland Falls (1996)).  

Eddie "Fingers" Coyle (Mitchum). A small time wiseguy. Lives in an older, rundown, Dorchester, Boston neighborhood. He's got a wife and three kids. Eddie's got loads of "friends, : but with friends like these you don't need enemies.

 

Mitchum eyes perpetually at half mast now gives off a look more world weary than that of a cool nonchalance of his earlier roles. He's very convincing as the two time loser faced with doing some serious time.  Boyle is good as the unassuming, under the radar, hit man. Rocco is believable as the lead bank robber, Santos equally as his second banana. Keats steals all the scenes he's in, and Jordan plays the manipulating lawman well.

 

The film really captures the ambiance of the dives and dumps of the South end of Boston in the early 1970's. 7/10 Full review with screencaps here: http://noirsville.blogspot.com/2017/03/the-friends-of-eddie-coyle-1973-new.html

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I would rank The Friends of Eddie Coyle, along with Farewell My Lovely, as, from what I've seen, at least, Mitchum's two best films of the post '60s.

 

Eddie Coyle captures the cold harshness of the lives of small time street criminals quite beautifully. It's a film that deserves to be better known. Peter Boyle's duplicity in the film is quite chilling.

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"Mademoiselle Fifi" (1944)--Starring Simone Simon, John Emery, and Kurt Krueger.  Directed by Robert Wise.

 

Only the second film directed by Wise, "Mademoiselle Fifi" is set during the Franco-Prussian of the 1870's.  Simon plays the laundress Elizabeth, who is the poorest passenger on a coach in war-torn France.  Her essential goodness is contrasted with the crassness and self-interest of the richer passengers.  The coach is delayed on a whim of a Prussian officer, nicknamed Mademoiselle Fifi, who wishes to have "dinner" with Elizabeth.  Film goes from there.

 

Film hits viewer over the head with anti-Nazi viewpoint, and labors to make the Franco-Prussian War resemble WW II.  Film is well acted by all, especially Simon, who is quite good as Elizabeth.  Norma Varden is the most memorable of the rich witch* passengers on the coach.  Krueger is appropriately hateful as "Fifi" (he's blond, so you know he stands for Nazi rats).  Film is lacking in subtlety; the hints of what Simon's real occupation is are uncommonly broad, and film really gives the end away near the beginning, when a statue and its' inscription are shown in long shot, medium shot, and then close-up.  At the films' end, the villagers seem to psychically know what's going on.

 

Movie is better propaganda than film, but is worth viewing as a time capsule, as an early example of Wise's work, and as one of the few non-horror films produced by Val Lewton.  2.5/4.

 

*--Otto disapproved of my original word choice.

 

Source--TCM.

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I would rank The Friends of Eddie Coyle, along with Farewell My Lovely, as, from what I've seen, at least, Mitchum's two best films of the post '60s.

 

Eddie Coyle captures the cold harshness of the lives of small time street criminals quite beautifully. It's a film that deserves to be better known. Peter Boyle's duplicity in the film is quite chilling.

Check out The Yakuza (1974) also

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Fire With Fire (2012)

 

When a fire fighter accidentally sees a pair of cold blooded murders committed by an Aryan gang boss he must enter a witness protection program in order to give testimony against him. Then something happens and he decides instead that he must hunt down and kill the white supremacist leader himself.

 

Pointless, brainless action film, with Josh Duhamel as the fire fighter, Rosario Dawson as an officer with whom he becomes involved and Bruce Willis as a weary detective trying to put away the Aryan leader.

 

To give you an idea of the intelligence of this film it has a scene in which Willis agrees to meet alone with the Aryan psychopath leader in a warehouse, surrounded by his gun totting gang of tattooed race haters. The entire purpose of the scene seems to be a demonstration of the macho brainless courage of Willis's character to do so.

 

Strictly a second rate feature for hard core action fans. Another reminder of the sad decline of Bruce Willis's career, the actor giving a tired, lifeless performance in a dull supporting role. It's been a long time since this same actor delivered such a terrific performance in Die Hard. He actually had personality in that film.

 

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2 out of 4.

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So I got food poisoning last night and it was pretty rough but I mostly over it. Just sitting here now looking like Maria Ouspenskaya and I need to get to work, but they're having a pre-code day on TCM

 

Watched UNDER 18 which was a fascinating film- Maltin gives it two stars so it's definitely recommended – and now I'm watching EVER IN MY HEART, which rings so true in today's climate. May just take the whole day off.

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Welcome to Mooseport (2004)

 

Gene Hackman's last film is a genial comedy in which he plays a former president of the United States who retires to a small Maine town and soon finds himself running for mayor against the local plumber who also runs a hardware store.

 

It's the kind of small town in which there is a moose named Bruce who wanders around ("Shouldn't he be in a zoo somewhere?" Hackman asks when he first sees him) and an 80 year old jogger who likes to run down the main street nude. Everyone waves hello to him with a smile without ever looking lower than his face.

 

The plumber for mayor is played by Ray Romano, and the first time Hackman meets him is when he is working on his toilet. "You mean I'm running for mayor against the man who repairs my toilet?" Hackman later says in surprise.

 

There is also a girl with whom Romano has been going for seven years (Maura Tierney) without having the nerve to pop her the big question. Hackman, who's divorced, knows nothing about the relationship and innocently asks Tierney out. She accepts, and it becomes another bone of contention, of course, between them, with the insecure Romano, now having to compete with a former President of the United States for his girl.

 

Hackman also brings with him to this small town an entourage of assistants, including two zealous security guards in suits, who have way too much time on their hands in this tiny burg.

 

There is nothing political about this comedy. It's an easy going, unpretentious film of small charms. It definitely has some funny moments.

 

For example, Hackman doesn't know it but for years whenever, as President, he went golfing, various agents would hide in the woods in order to toss out any of his balls (like almost all of them) that he hooked there back onto the fairway.

 

When he hooks another ball into the woods, Hackman shouts, "Wait for the bounce." When it doesn't bounce back onto the fairway (because the agents have just been cleared out of the woods) he is asked if he didn't ever hit a golf ball without a bounce. "Not since I was governor," Hackman replies.

 

Later when Hackman becomes exasperated with one of his assistants (Fred Savage) and orders him out of the room he then, in his anger, blurts out to his two security guards to go break his legs. They immediately start to chase after Savage.

 

Hackman turns to an assistant and says, "They know I was kidding, don't they?" When they give him looks that say "What do you think?" he immediately shouts out to the guards, "I WAS JUST KIDDING!!!"

 

Marcia Gay Harden plays an assistant to the President who likes him more than he realizes, while Rip Torn scores well as the President's campaign manager, ready to pull dirty deals to help him win the mayoralty race even in such a small guileless town as Mooseport.

 

Ray Romano and Gene Hackman play well off one another, though I have to say that Romano's aw shucks gee whiz small town nice guy shtick wears out with me after a while. But it's a pleasure to watch the effortless charm and subtle comedic ability of Hackman.

 

If Welcome to Mooseport is a minor little comedy in the final analysis, it is, at least, a pleasant diversion, with Gene Hackman in fine form in his last role before retirement.

 

One more thing, as an Ontarian, I take some pleasure in the fact that much of this film was shot in my province, including a golf match between Hackman and Romano. Toronto comes up in the film's credits a lot. To know that the great Hackman's last film effort was done close to where I live gives me a small sense of local pride.

 

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2.5 out of 4

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i also watched BORDERTOWN (1935) for the first time- which was kind of a mess, but an interesting one. did not know it was the basis for THEY DRIVE BY NIGHT- which for all its faults is a better movie.

 

kind of a postcode Precode; and worth a watch, but Davis is a bit erratic in this one (Lupino does it better in NIGHT)

 

INTRIGUING ENDING.

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BTW Tom:

 

That's RAY Romano in MOOSEPORT.  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Actually, it's his twin brother Roy who stars in the film.

 

Okay, kidding. Thanks for the info and I'll change the spelling. You can tell that I'm a real Romano fan, can't you?

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Welcome to Mooseport (2004)

 

 

I thought Welcome to Mooseport was awful, just pedestrian, unfunny sit-com material, and it has always annoyed me that it's Hackman's last film. Others have had worse final films, but not many. Talk about going out with a whimper.

 

But I liked your write-up, Tom.

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I thought Welcome to Mooseport was awful, just pedestrian, unfunny sit-com material, and it has always annoyed me that it's Hackman's last film. Others have had worse final films, but not many. Talk about going out with a whimper.

 

But I liked your write-up, Tom.

 

Awful, really?

 

Humour, in particular, is subjective, as we all know, Lawrence. Mooseport is clearly a minor film on which to end a career, as I indicated, but I think Hackman went out with a very solid performance. I enjoyed the film well enough.

 

When it comes to terrible final films of a major star nothing could be worse than Errol Flynn and Cuban Rebel Girls.

 

I had a friend at work to whom I would occasionally make praising comments about Flynn as a star. He had never seen a single film of his.

 

One night he stayed up to watch his first Flynn film on television. Wouldn't you know it, it was the actor's last and easily worst film, Cuban Rebel Girls, made when Errol had great difficulty getting film work because of his dissipation after years of self abuse.

 

The next day my friend came to work and said to me, "Tom, I watched Errol Flynn last night. He steeeeenks!"

 

I told him that judging Flynn by that film was like judging Ali (this guy was a big fight fan) just by his fight with Larry Holmes. He merely smiled and repeated, "Fleeeen, he steeeenk!"

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When it comes to terrible final films of a major star nothing could be worse than Errol Flynn and Cuban Rebel Girls.

 

Ha! That's actually one of the ones I was thinking of when I said, "Others have had worse final films." Also Veronica Lake and Flesh Feast.

 

As for the Mooseport humor, you're right about humor being subjective. And it also matters what the viewer brings to the film, what biases and what they have and have not seen, which can make the stale seem fresh. I knew some people who enjoyed Mooseport, but they were also big fans of Ray Romano and his TV show.

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I thought Welcome to Mooseport was awful, just pedestrian, unfunny sit-com material, and it has always annoyed me that it's Hackman's last film. Others have had worse final films, but not many. Talk about going out with a whimper.

 

But I liked your write-up, Tom.

 

Ohh, I forgot about that one!  I always used to say that Gene Hackman had NEVER delivered a bad performance except for "Two of a Kind".   (Granted, I hadn't seen Marooned either, but...)

 

Yes, he was even the only thing worth watching in "Superman IV" and "Uncommon Valor".

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Ha! That's actually one of the ones I was thinking of when I said, "Others have had worse final films." Also Veronica Lake and Flesh Feast.

 

As for the Mooseport humor, you're right about humor being subjective. And it also matters what the viewer brings to the film, what biases and what they have and have not seen, which can make the stale seem fresh. I knew some people who enjoyed Mooseport, but they were also big fans of Ray Romano and his TV show.

 

I haven't seen Flesh Feast but I've read a few shuddering reports about it.

 

I had never seen Ray Romano before so he meant nothing to me. I'm a Hackman fan, and he made Mooseport pleasurable for me. Cuban Rebel Girls is depressing for most Flynn fans, I'm sure.

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The House of the Seven Gables (1940) youtube

 

This film bears little resemblance to the 19th century Hawthorne novel (which may be a good thing, since nothing happens for about the first two-thirds of the book). On the other hand, this film could have been a whole lot better. Still, it’s a decent way to kill 90 minutes.

 

George Sanders gives his usual pompous a** performance as a scumbag trying to cheat brother Vincent Price out of the family fortune, even though the family is bankrupt. When their father vapor locks during an argument with Price, Sanders accuses his brother of murder.  The jury convicts Price without deliberating. Ah, the good old days of law and order. Eventually, Price’s sentence is commuted, and he figures out a way to get even.

 

Sanders and Price try to out-ham each other, with neither succeeding.  Price does get to sing while pretending to play the harpsichord. Lovely Margaret Lindsay gives a fine performance as Price’s cousin and lover, transitioning from an effervescent beauty into an old maid. In the novel, her character and Price’s character are siblings – but Hawthorne was not that kinky.

 

There is an unnecessary subplot concocted by the screenwriter involving abolition and Sanders making money off the slave trade. I guess somebody felt his character wasn’t repulsive enough.

 

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The House of the Seven Gables (1940) youtube

 

 

I agree with you, Rich, that Margaret Lindsay is the most persuasive performer in The House of the Seven Gables. While I know that most film fans will be more interested in the participation of George Sanders and Vincent Price as part of the cast, I think it can be argued that this film may well have been the highlight of her career as an actress. She has a dominant role in a class "A" production and neither of her more illustrious male co-stars dwarf her.

 

Not long after this 1940 production Lindsay would be getting throwaway support roles in "A" productions (ie. The Spoilers and Scarlet Street).

 

By the way, the Universal Vault MOD of this film is quite gorgeous. I've included a couple of screen snapshots taken from the DVD-R to prove my point.

 

 

vlcsnap-2017-03-31-18h04m23s087_zpsq03qc

 

vlcsnap-2017-03-31-18h12m47s103_zpsnhdve

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I agree with you, Rich, that Margaret Lindsay is the most persuasive performer in The House of the Seven Gables. While I know that most film fans will be more interested in the participation of George Sanders and Vincent Price as part of the cast, I think it can be argued that this film may well have been the highlight of her career as an actress. She has a dominant role in a class "A" production and neither of her more illustrious male co-stars dwarf her.

 

Not long after this 1940 production Lindsay would be getting throwaway support roles in "A" productions (ie. The Spoilers and Scarlet Street).

 

By the way, the Universal Vault MOD of this film is quite gorgeous. I've included a couple of screen snapshots taken from the DVD-R to prove my point.

 

 

vlcsnap-2017-03-31-18h04m23s087_zpsq03qc

 

vlcsnap-2017-03-31-18h12m47s103_zpsnhdve

The print on youtube was excellent. I was surprised it was up.

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