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The print on youtube was excellent. I was surprised it was up.

 

I just took at look at the YT copy of House. You're right, it is excellent, probably off the Universal Vault DVD. If someone wants to see it they should look now because there's no garantee it will remain. The copyright lawyers are always shutting now stuff on that website.

 

For years I had looked for an episode of Errol Flynn Theatre called The 1000th Night of Don Juan, a 25 minute TV drama in which Errol Flynn appeared two years before his death. He played an older Juan in it and there were a few jokey references in the screenplay to his getting on in age.

 

About two weeks ago, much to my shock, I found it on You Tube. Not a great looking image but I downloaded it onto my computer immediately. It is rare beyond belief. I was going to tell a friend about it and later that day searched for it again on You Tube. It was gone - taken off for copyright infringement reasons literally within hours of my having downloaded it. I was so happy that I happened across it but ironically the very day it would disappear.

 

I see that there a second copy of House of the Seven Gables on You Tube now but you have to hit a link to have it take you to another website (presumably money will be involved for that viewing). This is all but a garantee that the free version of the same film will disappear one day, I figure. See the free version while you can, folks.

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Tell Me In The Sunlight (1965) Sweet & Sleazy

 

TMITS%2Bposter.jpg

 

Directed by Steve Cochran. Writing Credits go to Steve Cochran, Jo Heims, and Robert Stevens. The cinematography was by Rod Yould and the music by Michael Andersen. 

 

In Nassau in the Bahamas, an American Supercargo on leave picks up a beautiful exotic dancer for a casual fling, but falls in love with her in spite of having just met her. She seems to feel the same way for him, but she already has a boyfriend. This leads to an awkward and unpredictable love triangle that could become dangerous. (from IMDb)

 

A must see for Steve Cochran fans. 7/10

 


 

 

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The Underworld Story (United Artists, 1950) - Hey, this was a really great movie that I hadn't seen before. A collective actors who maybe never really made it big and who mostly worked on films produced by small studios that ended up getting released at places like UA - here we have Dan Duryea, Gale Storm, Herbert Marshall, Howard DeSilva and Alan Hale, Jr. I actually didn't remember who Duryea was sitting down at my TV tonight. Only the first name was sticking out in my brain, and I must confess I had Duryea confused with Dan O'Herlihy and that this was going to be the night honoring the actor from Robinson Crusoe and, much later, Robocop. But, of course, as soon as I saw Duryea, I knew who he was. I'd seen him in everything from The Little Foxes to Ball of Fire to Pride of the Yankees without ever knowing him by name. One of the joys of my long years of TCM viewing is finally becoming so familiar with a character actor/actress that I begin to recognize and identify him/her on sight, and I think this has probably long overdue finally happened with Duryea and me tonight after more than 15 years of being a TCM regular.

 

This is one of those movies where you kind of want to brain the protagonist and say just accept your destiny as a good guy already! Duryea has many, many opportunities to do the right thing and frustratingly refuses to do the right thing until at least a good two-thirds into the movie. There was an interesting, definite racial charge to the whole brouhaha certainly uncommon to movies of its era. Everyone in the cast whom I recognized was terrific. De Silva in particular has a nice psychotic intensity to him. Gale Storm, whom I previously only knew from It Happened on Fifth Avenue, has an unfortunate haircut here, I think intended to make her look older than she really was, but I loved a lot of the dynamic between her and Duryea. An extremely subdued romance, though her (Spoiler alert!) acceptance of an ambulance ride at film's end maybe indicates a romance this indeed was.

 

I would call it a noir? Would the rest of you call it a noir? Submergence of truth regardless that an innocent might die as a result. That's pretty noirish.

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The Underworld Story (United Artists, 1950)

 

Anyone one else surprised that the "black" maid in the film charged with murder is played by Mary Anderson, a Caucasian actress? I mean, come on, this is a 1950 film. Plus the actress didn't even look black, at least to my eyes.

 

Anderson is probably best known today to film fans as one of the cast of Hitchcock's Lifeboat.

 

Some might cite Pinky, made the year before with Jeanne Crain playing a "black" woman, or, at least, a woman of mixed race. I know. But Crain was the star of a major production there and her character was what the film was all about. Obviously Fox was concerned about the box office appeal of a film with a real black actress in the lead, particularly in the southern states.

 

But in Undercover Story the black maid is a supporting role, not one of the leads in the film. She has limited screen time and, if my memory serves me correctly, disappears from the film, even though proving her character's innocence is what drives the story. You would think that they could have cast a real black actress in the part.

 

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And a major plot point of Pinky was that the character could pass as white. As good of actresses as Lena Horne or Dorothy Dandridge might have been, could they pass for white?

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Tom, I must confess while noting just for a moment that the actress was pretty light-skinned, I bought into the illusion that she was actually African-American, as I was pretty wrapped up in the story. That is unfortunate. And here I had gone to bed thinking what a great, dignified role that had been for an African-American actress, only to wake up and read this!

 

But sadly, this was, I guess, not all that unusual for those years. Besides Pinky from 1949, as you mentioned, and this film from 1950, we had Showboat from 1951, which just aired on TCM the other night, in which Ava Gardner played a half-black woman. And this, Ben Mankiewicz noted, after MGM seriously considered Lena  Horne for the role (she certainly would have been a better singer, no offense to Ava). Although again, this was a starring role.

 

You're correct. The maid character, after turning herself in, only appears in one more scene in the film, in which she refuses to confess to murder in exchange for a lighter sentence. The actress, whom I'd never heard of before, makes a strong impression for being in the film for maybe 10 minutes total, but yep, it certainly seems an odd casting decision.  

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Fedya, I guess throwing out all other considerations, your argument makes sense, but to me it sounds like yet another rationalization a studio exec of that era would use to refuse to cast an actor/actress of color in a role that was actually, you know, of color. I think casting a black actress in the role of a black woman, even one passing for white, should trump other considerations. In the ideal little world in my head, anyway.

 

I just thought of an incident of Hollywood moving backward in this era. In the 1934 version of Imitation of Life, the key role of the young woman passing for white was played by an African-American, actress, Fredi Washington. But in the 1959 version, she was played by half-white, half-Mexican Susan Kohner.

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Here's an irony for you.

 

Mary Anderson, a white actress cast as a "black" character in Underworld Story, had a brother who was an actor, James Anderson.

 

And who is Anderson best remembered for playing? The racist Bob Ewell in To Kill A Mockingbird!

 

ToKillMockngbrd_090Pyxurz.jpg

 

Mary died in 2014, at age 96. She had had a small role in Gone With the Wind, having been one of the last three surviving cast members of that film.

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The Wolf Man. Again. Watching this film for the second time on TCM in as many days has led me to speculate about a few things. Curt Siodmak penned the script, but the dialogue that Claude Rains spouts is nothing from the script.I doubt that Claude Rains had a say in the dialogue. Most of Sir John's dialogue is not in the original script. So, any input?

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Mary died in 2014, at age 96. She had had a small role in Gone With the Wind, having been one of the last three surviving cast members of that film.

 

Another and more substantial role of Mary Anderson's career and one yet to be mentioned here is of the somewhat needy and jealous of the Olivia de Havilland character(due to Anderson's film husband's unrequited love of the latter) in TO EACH HIS OWN (1946), and who in the film is given de Havilland's born out of wedlock infant after her own infant dies during childbirth. 

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Another and more substantial role of Mary Anderson's career and one yet to be mentioned here is of the somewhat needy and jealous of the Olivia de Havilland character(due to Anderson's film husband's unrequited love of the latter) in TO EACH HIS OWN (1946), and who in the film is given de Havilland's born out of wedlock infant after her own infant dies during childbirth. 

 

Mary Anderson's most interesting role is as a black women in The Underworld Story and where she says the "N" word.

 

The movies stars Dan Duryea, Gale Strom and the always reliable Herbert Marshall.     

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The Wolf Man. Again. Watching this film for the second time on TCM in as many days has led me to speculate about a few things. Curt Siodmak penned the script, but the dialogue that Claude Rains spouts is nothing from the script.I doubt that Claude Rains had a say in the dialogue. Most of Sir John's dialogue is not in the original script. So, any input?

 

Have you got a copy of the original script?

 

the rest of my input it mostly more questions, like why relatively "name" stars like Warren William (an in-joke on his reputation maybe?) and Ralph Bellamy are relegated to- more or less- walk-on parts. Neither has that much purpose in the story. i know THE WOLF MAN was heavily edited (a scene with a bear was cut), i'd be quite curious what the ORIGINAL SCRIPT looked like.

 

can it be found online?

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Mary Anderson's most interesting role is as a black women in The Underworld Story and where she says the "N" word.

 

The movies stars Dan Duryea, Gale Strom and the always reliable Herbert Marshall.     

 

Yeah, I know James. Ya see, I watched that movie last night on TCM for probably the third time. And btw, you forgot to also give credit here to the wonderful Howard Da Silva in this thing, and who almost(and maybe even does) steals the picture with his portrayal of the ruthless and wisecracking kingpin of that underworld mob.

 

However, and although as has already been said in this thread of her role in that Duryea flick being one she does as well as she can despite the fact of her being miscast in it, I don't know if I can also say that that was her "most interesting" one in her career.

 

(...as I've always found her roles in Hitchcock's LIFEBOAT and the aforementioned TO EACH HIS OWN quite interesting and memorable, also)

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the rest of my input it mostly more questions, like why relatively "name" stars like Warren William (an in-joke on his reputation maybe?) and Ralph Bellamy are relegated to- more or less- walk-on parts. Neither has that much purpose in the story. i know THE WOLF MAN was heavily edited (a scene with a bear was cut), i'd be quite curious what the ORIGINAL SCRIPT looked like.

 

 

The most egregious cut was a walk-on by Groucho Marx, who, after seeing Maria Ouspenskaya, warbles "boogie boogie boogie."

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Yeah, I know James. Ya see, I watched that movie last night on TCM for probably the third time. And btw, you forgot to also give credit here to the wonderful Howard Da Silva in this thing, and who almost(and maybe even does) steals the picture with his portrayal of the ruthless and wisecracking kingpin of that underworld mob.

 

 

Da Silva was good in that film, but this would be one of his last films in Hollywood because of the blacklist. He would get a little TV work but no film role again until the early '60s.

 

I enjoyed the scene in which a smiling Da Silva, so cocksure of himself, was making Duryea understandably squirm, Dan not knowing if he was going to survive the evening or not.

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"Female on the Beach" (1955)--Starring Joan Crawford, Jeff Chandler, Jan Sterling, and Cecil Kellaway.

 

One of Crawford's last romantic melodramas, film showed it was time for Crawford to act her age.  She could no longer get away with being a "specialty dancer", even in the recent past.  In her closeups, especially in the clinch with Chandler in the last half hour of the film, their noses, and especially her fingers(?), are fuzzy and indistinct, like the cameraman is using too many filters/too much Vaseline on the lens.  The fact that Crawford is older than Chandler is only accentuated by closeups.

 

The plot; Lynn Markham (Crawford) takes possession of her late husband's house on the beach the day after the previous tenant Miss Crandall (Judith Evelyn) did a swan dive off the balcony--with or without help.  The Crime Scene Investigation Unit is still doing work below the broken balcony railing. When Joan asks the real estate agent (Jan Sterling) what's going on, she is told "Oh, some government business."

 

"Beach bum" Drummy Hall (Chandler) has a key to Markham's house, as she finds out the next morning when she wakes up and finds him in her kitchen.  He lives with his procurers (Kellaway and Natalie Schaefer) in exchange for giving them a percentage of his profits from rich women.  You can predict the plot from here.

 

The performances vary from good (Kelly and Schaefer) to overwrought (Crawford).

 

As the camera was no longer kind to Joan, it settles for ogling Chandler and providing a fashion show for Joan, who models each of her outfits (she actually twirls for the camera in two outfits).

 

Other memorable scenes: the opening credits, which try hard for a "From Here to Eternity" (1953) feel; the telephone scene where Crawford rubs her rear; Crawford running along the beach in high heels.

 

A fun watch; on a "so bad it's good scale", 3/4: taken seriously, 2/4.

 

Source--archive.org--Search "Universal"; limit results to only movies, list by date of archiving.  There have been over 75 Universal movies archived in the last three months; Female on the Beach was a Beautiful print, so it may be worth your time to see what all has been archived (two titles I noticed were "The List of Adrian Messenger" (1963) and "College Confidential" (1960)--the last a Mamie Van Doren film I haven't seen.)

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Tom, I definitely agree about how good Howard Da Silva is in The Underworld Story. Lots of nice low-angle shots, especially of Da Silva, in the film. It seems odd to have a white actress in a role that isn't a "pass for white" story. Mary Anderson plays the part well, however. The director is Cy Enfield, and if you've seen films like Try and Get Me, Hell Drivers, Zulu, and Sands of the Kalahiri, you know what a good director he can be.

 

A big shout-out to TCM for showing Another Part of the Forest. Lillian Hellman's prequel to The Little Foxes is cleverly written; the cast is first-rate; and Michael Gordon's direction is really outstanding. Some imaginative camera movements bring a welcome fluidity; an adaptation of a play can easily be stodgy, stiff, and dull. (Hm, why does Mourning Becomes Electra come to mind?)

 

These may be my favorite performances by Edmond O'Brien and Ann Blyth, and I can't help rooting for O'Brien as the slick and smiling Ben, though he's certainly no good guy. Dan Duryea plays a sometimes laughable, sometimes detestable, and sometimes pathetic loser like no other actor can. (He's playing the father of the character he plays in The Little Foxes.) Fredric March plays the villainous father with admirable restraint. All of these characters are three-dimensional. Florence Eldridge as the mother of the three little foxes rises to her big scene at the end, crowned by a fine crane shot as she ascends the outdoor stairs from the garden behind the house. That set is particularly admirable.

 

The supporting cast includes John Dall as the foolish young gallant whom Regina (Blyth) loves, Betsy Blair as his fluttery sister, Dona Drake as a can-can dancer, and Fritz Leiber in the small but pivotal role of the old-school Southern gentleman Colonel Isham. If you like The Little Foxes, you'll probably like Another Part of the Forest, too.

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Have you got a copy of the original script?

 

the rest of my input it mostly more questions, like why relatively "name" stars like Warren William (an in-joke on his reputation maybe?) and Ralph Bellamy are relegated to- more or less- walk-on parts. Neither has that much purpose in the story. i know THE WOLF MAN was heavily edited (a scene with a bear was cut), i'd be quite curious what the ORIGINAL SCRIPT looked like.

 

can it be found online?

 

I wish I had the original script. I have a book - Universal Film Script Series of the Wolf Man which has the original script.

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"Carry On...Don't Lose Your Head" aka "Carry On Pimpernel" (1966)--Starring Sidney James, Kenneth Williams, Jim Dale, and Joan Sims.

 

British spoof of "The Scarlet Pimpernel", along with bits and pieces from "A Tale of Two Cities", "Marie Antoinette", " The Three Musketeers", and an ending spoof of every bad sword fighting scene you've ever watched.

 

In 1789, the foppish Sir Rodney Effing (James) and Lord Darcy Pue (Dale) are bored with their easy life in England.  They hear of the Revolution occurring in France, and determine to go over there and rescue the aristocrats fated for the guillotine.  They do this in various disguises and Effing becomes known as "The Black Fingernail".

 

James does well at parodying all the actors who were too old for the roles they were cast in, and playing up the extremes of his double role.  Williams is howlingly funny as Citizen Camembert, who acts superior to everyone and is constantly being outwitted by "The Black Fingernail", his wife, and others around him.  Dale is usually in the background.  Sims is hilarious as a Cockney accented nitwit who married up in Society.  The gag involving her, a Dangerously low-cut dress, and a locket is one of the movies' highlights.

 

I can't post my favorite line from the film, but two other good lines:

 

Williams (wailing, as 30-odd swordsmen are destroying his property) "Watch The Furniture! ... My petit point!"

 

Announcer at a costume ball: "Count and Countess de la Plume de ma Tante".

 

Politically Incorrect, bawdy, silly spoof is slow starting, but is hilarious at times, and only has one gag that is a complete failure (the ingenue does a song on the harp called "She Loveth Me"--awful, but just provided time to catch my breath).  3/4.  

 

Source--DailyMotion.com

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James, I just watched The Underworld Story last night, and I gotta say, I don't remember Mary Anderson saying the N word. Now, she says the OTHER N word, the one that rhymes with "Begro", to describe her race, but nothing shocking about that. I'm 99.9 per cent sure the only time the "N" word is uttered in the entire movie is when Herbert Marshall's slimeball son says it.

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Da Silva was good in that film, but this would be one of his last films in Hollywood because of the blacklist. He would get a little TV work but no film role again until the early '60s.

 

I enjoyed the scene in which a smiling Da Silva, so cocksure of himself, was making Duryea understandably squirm, Dan not knowing if he was going to survive the evening or not.

 

Yeah Tom, I knew of Da Silva being blacklisted. In fact, you have NO idea how close I came to also mentioning that fact in my earlier reply to James and when I first mentioned Da Silva's name in this thread and how I felt he almost steals the movie with his fine work as that mob boss.

 

(...BUT, seein' as how just the MENTION of the Hollywood Blacklisting back in the day seems to tick off a certain few folks around here lately, and especially whenever nasally Ben M mentions it on the air, I decided I'd just let that sleeping dog lie, as they say!)

 

;)

 

LOL 

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filmlover posted: British spoof of "The Scarlet Pimpernel"  

(snipped)

In 1789, the foppish Sir Rodney Effing 

 

 

Was that a joke like we say "F-bomb"? Wow.

 

And yes, of course classic movie scripts can be found online at the internet movie script database.

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(...BUT, seein' as how just the MENTION of the Hollywood Blacklisting back in the day seems to tick off a certain few folks around here lately, and especially whenever nasally Ben M mentions it on the air, I decided I'd just let that sleeping dog lie, as they say!)

 

 

As long as Ben doesn't suffer from nasal drip when on camera, he's OK with me.

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