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I also find myself, every time I come to the island, annually watching some or all of the 1981 portmanteau film THE MONSTER CLUB directed by Roy Ward Baker.

 

I saw this thing on VHS as a kid and it contributed to my being such a messed up person.

 

The trio of tales are all pretty good, and the interspersed musical numbers are quite frankly great – I specially enjoy the rockin musical number THE STRIPPER that runs right before the third and final story THE GHOULS which is the scariest of the lot, TERRIFIED ME AS A CHILD and IS still effectively creepy, the music, the lighting, the actors, There's even an interspersed animated scene of sorts, they all come together on this one.

 

You can watch the film on YouTube broken up into thirds or in it's entirety. Either recommended.

 

It will **** you up FOR LIFE**

 

 

**(not really, but it's pretty scary still!)

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I also find myself, every time I come to the island, annually watching some or all of the 1981 portmanteau film THE MONSTER CLUB directed by Roy Ward Baker.

 

I saw that only once, when it was new. I thought it was terrible. It sounds like it deserves a revisit!

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Hello My Name is Doris (2015): This movie stars Sally Field, Max Greenfield, and Tyne Daly. It's been on my list for a while now, and I finally got Hulu, so I was able to watch it today on my day off. Field stars as an older woman who develops strong feelings for the new employee at her company (of which she is the accountant). This movie was humorous and Ms. Field was quite enjoyable. Her wardrobe, however, was the true star of this film. 

 

The Hours: This one is the more newer additions to my watchlist, however, I thoroughly enjoyed it. I am now on a mission to read the novel on which the film is based. I was very impressed with the fluidity of the plot settings. There are 3 different women all basically living with some form of depression or other, and the novel "Mrs. Dalloway" is the factor that ties them all together. Virginia Woolf is writing the novel (in 1941), housewife Laura Brown is reading the novel (in 1951), and Clarissa Vaughan is living the novel (in 2001). With 3 different storylines in 3 different decades, there was the potential for disaster, however, I, as the audience, was never left behind. I was aware of what was happening and to which of the 3 leading ladies. 

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"Magdalena: Released From Shame" (2010)

 

Story of Jesus transpires through the eyes of Mary Magdaleneshowing Christ value of women. Crucifixion scene was tame, whipped while wearing garment, no scourging.  The Passion this film is not.

 

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I saw [THE MONSTER CLUB] only once, when it was new. I thought it was terrible. It sounds like it deserves a revisit!

Well....

 

I don't think there's any way it can make the same kind of impression on anyone who wasn't an 8-year-old kid growing up in North Carolina right at the midpoint of the Reagan era whose outlook on life was mostly care bears and lollipops and sunshine and happy endings and all that bull **** who got their dad to rent this from the mall video store because A) VINCENT PRICE and B)Elvira was on the box, and Elvira was always the best part of "Dick Clark's bloopers and practical jokes."

 

(unrelated, but looking back now it's clear that Ed McMahon was the greatest part of "DickClark's bloopers and Practical jokes.")

 

anyway, it blew my mind and I don't think I've ever been quite right in the head since.

 

& Not just THE GHOULS segment but also THE SHADMOCK segment which is the perfect way to start the film. The ending to it is really haunting.

 

The in between segment is funny and well acted and memorable, sort of an Ealing comedy meets a Hammer Horror

 

Say what you will about Roy Ward Baker, his films always have flaws but they also always have something fascinating going on too...And some of the visuals in this are terrific.

 

Someone also does a walk-through of their copy of the comic book, which is very rare, which came out to commemorate the release of the movie back in 1981. Some of the artistry in it is also fantastic.

 

Note: Voice transcription.

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Well....

I don't think there's any way it can make the same kind of impression on anyone who wasn't an 8-year-old kid growing up in North Carolina right at the midpoint of the Reagan era whose outlook on life was mostly care bears and lollipops and sunshine and happy endings and all that bull **** who got their dad to rent this from the mall video store because A) VINCENT PRICE and B)Elvira was on the box, and Elvira was always the best part of "Dick Clark's bloopers and practical jokes."

 

Say what you will about Roy Ward Baker, his films always have flaws but they also always have something fascinating going on too...And some of the visuals in this are terrific.

 

I always grew up confusing Amicus's "portmanteau" films of goofy comic-book-horror anthologies (literally, in the case of '72's Tales From the Crypt" and '73's "Vault of Horror") with the classier stuff coming out of Hammer, because they often shared the good-looking design, cinematography and English character-actor casting by a Roy Ward Baker or Robert Fuest, but never got to see many on TV until they showed up on the cheap at Amazon Prime.

Always thought Monster Club was the last of the old-school early-70's Amici, coming late to the party in '81, but IMDb proves me wrong.  Apparently the real Amicus wrapped up after the '74-'77 Edgar Rice Burroughs "Land That Time Forgot" trilogy.  (And Vincent Price never worked for Amicus, as he was busy with Amer. Int'l's Poe and Dr. Phibes.)

 

Still, a good place to look for similar goofy/scary package films, although it's only "Tales" and "House That Dripped Blood" that might deliver anything to similarly Eff one up for life.

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"Dinosaurus!" (1960)--Starring the island of St.Croix and two plastic dinosaurs.

 

Awful sci-fi/horror movie whose characters have IQs in the single digits; it makes "The Night of the Lepus" (1972) look like "Citizen Kane" (1941).

 

The plot: Developers are blowing up things in a blocked harbor.  Girl drives up in a motorboat, ignoring the red flag waved at her and the cries of the construction crew to go back. After her boat sets off a bomb Girl dives overboard to "Davy Jones Locker", sees two dinosaurs, and faints underwater. Boyfriend rescues her, spots dinosaurs, says they must have been "flash frozen", and has construction equipment haul their carcasses up on the beach.  A Neanderthal  also is found, and hauled on the beach.  That night, a storm hits, and a three pronged bolt of lightning hits the creatures, thawing them out and reawakening them.  Chaos ensues.

 

The special effects are horrendous-a climactic fight between the dinosaurs and a truck are Obviously using a toy truck and plastic dinosaur; the pool of quicksand resembles a kale milkshake; the Neanderthal is just a man running around in a loincloth.

 

The accented actors all sound like male or female versions of Ricky Ricardo.

 

I was rooting for the dinosaurs to make mincemeat of everyone--the dinosaurs are so much more intelligent than the characters.

 

For BAD movie fans only.

 

Source--archive.org.  Search "Dinosaurus_1960".  

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"Dinosaurus!" (1960)--Starring the island of St.Croix and two plastic dinosaurs.

 

Awful sci-fi/horror movie whose characters have IQs in the single digits; it makes "The Night of the Lepus" (1972) look like "Citizen Kane" (1941).

 

 

Yep, you've got it, fl.

 

I remember seeing this one first-run with my dad in downtown L.A. and after an early day Dodger game at the L.A. Coliseum. This being before Dodger Stadium would open in '62.

 

And yeah, I also remember even to this then 8 y/o thinking what a lousy movie it was as we headed back to the car for the drive home.

 

(...and what self-respecting 8 y/o doesn't like dinosaurs...hell, it even had THAT goin' for it)

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"The Invisible Ray" (1936)--Starring Boris Karloff, Bela Lugosi, Frances Drake, and Violet Kemble Cooper.

 

Better than average Universal sci-fi/horror movie.  Karloff is scientist Janos Rukh, who lives in a castle in the Carpathian Mountains with his wife Diane (Drake) and blind mother (Kemble Cooper).  He has invited a team of scientists, including Dr. Felix Benet (Lugosi) to witness a re-enactment of "past vibrations" from the "nebula of Andromeda". He successfully recreates a vision of a meteor hitting the continent of Africa.  The scientists subsequently invite Rukh to join their planned expedition to Africa to look for the meteor and the powerful elements of it that Rukh calls "Radium X".  Things go dreadfully wrong, of course.

 

Karloff is excellent as the misunderstood scientist who goes Too Far.  Lugosi contributes one of his most restrained performances as one of the good guys.  Drake is effective as the damsel in distress.  Kemble Cooper is very good as The Voice of Doom; Maria Ouspenskaya must have watched this movie before making "The Wolf Man" (1941).

 

Franz Waxman contributed an underrated musical score.  The castle sets that dwarf everyone aren't credited on TCM's webpage, but they are creepily effective.  If my eyes didn't deceive me, some of the laboratory equipment that was prominently featured in "Frankenstein" (1931) and "Bride of Frankenstein" (1935) was reused in the Planetarium sequences.

 

There are flaws.  The native laborers in Africa all sound like they come from the American South, and Janos' name is pronounced "Yanosh" or "Yanush", depending on who is talking.  But overall, this is an underrated horror film.  Very worth the watch.  2.9/4.

 

Source--archive.org.  Search "The_Invisible_Ray_1936"; should be the first result, archived April 11th, 2017.

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"The Invisible Ray" (1936)--Starring Boris Karloff, Bela Lugosi, Frances Drake, and Violet Kemble Cooper.

 

Thanks for the review of a fun Universal I watched again just last year myself, filmlover.

 

There really isn't any horror to find in Invisible Ray, it's really is more of a sci fi exercise. Also of note, this was the first of the Karloff-Lugosi co-starring features in which it was clearly a Karloff vehicle, with Bela in support. But you're right about Lugosi giving an effectively restrained performance.

 

We all know about the sad decline of Lugosi's career. He was lucky that Universal finally agreed to cast him in a repeat his most famous role, Dracula, in Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein. But Lugosi's name meant so little to the studio by that time (1948) that Bela was not asked by them to promote the film. Who was? Karloff, even though he wasn't even in the film!

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"The Bad And The Beautiful"  (1952)  starring Lana Turner, Kirk Douglas, Dick Powell

 

Have seen this movie many times, but always a good watch.  This film has a loaded cast, a cool story, and great cinematography.  Plus Lana Turner, and you can't go wrong with Lana Turner. 

 

 

 

 

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Who Killed Teddy Bear (1965) Sleazy New York Noir Creepshow

 

MPW-19269.jpg

 

Camp Cult Classic? Late Night Shlock? Sleazy Trash? Decadent Depravity? Homoerotic Hoke? Sexual Psychodrama? Lost Noir? Yesssss!!! All of the above and beyond.

 

More on Film Noir/Gangster page, but full review with NSFW screencaps here: http://noirsville.blogspot.com/2017/04/who-killed-teddy-bear-1965-sleazy-new.html

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Hey. Back at my vomputer now, soes I can post some clips related to THE MONSTER CLUB, which I mentioned earlier:

 

here is a really interesting interview between Vincent Price and (an apparently sober!) John Carradine around the time of the film. they disCUSS horror Films and actors they admire (they discuss John Barrymoore, who Carradine knew and it's pretty neat)

 

 

here is the trailer for THE MONSTER CLUB, which does include some spoilers, but is pretty cool nonetheless:

 

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Who Killed Teddy Bear (1965) Sleazy New York Noir Creepshow

 

Camp Cult Classic? Late Night Shlock? Sleazy Trash? Decadent Depravity? Homoerotic Hoke? Sexual Psychodrama? Lost Noir? Yesssss!!! All of the above and beyond.

 

 

 

If I ever watch this one, Joe, I'll make sure to have a shower nearby just in case I feel the need for one afterward. Thanks for the warning!

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"The Invisible Ray" (1936)--Starring Boris Karloff, Bela Lugosi, Frances Drake, and Violet Kemble Cooper.

 

Better than average Universal sci-fi/horror movie.....  Kemble Cooper is very good as The Voice of Doom; Maria Ouspenskaya must have watched this movie before making "The Wolf Man" (1941).

 

 

Nope. A NIGHT AT THE OPERA.

 

ps- I love THE INVISIBLE RAY and would probably give it three and a half out of four stars.

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"The Invisible Ray" (1936)--Starring Boris Karloff, Bela Lugosi, Frances Drake, and Violet Kemble Cooper.

 

Better than average Universal sci-fi/horror movie.  Karloff is scientist Janos Rukh, who lives in a castle in the Carpathian Mountains with his wife Diane (Drake) and blind mother (Kemble Cooper).  He has invited a team of scientists, including Dr. Felix Benet (Lugosi) to witness a re-enactment of "past vibrations" from the "nebula of Andromeda". He successfully recreates a vision of a meteor hitting the continent of Africa.  The scientists subsequently invite Rukh to join their planned expedition to Africa to look for the meteor and the powerful elements of it that Rukh calls "Radium X".  Things go dreadfully wrong, of course.

 

 

 

 

 

Part of plot....

A visionary astronomer, Dr. Janos Rukh (Boris Karloff) has invented a telescope that can look far out into space — into the Andromeda Galaxy and photograph rays of light that will show the Earth's past, something which he has theorized as possible for some years, to his discredit among his scientist-colleagues. 

 

 

Not to get off topic but did the producers realized they are stating fact, when you look further back into space, the further back in time one is seeing.  I say that is visionary.

 

Hubble Deep Field View

 

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Sleepy Hollow (1999)

 

Director Tim Burton's elaborate take on Washington Irving's tale of Ichabod Crane and the Headless Horseman doesn't have much in common with Irving but excels as a Gothic exercise in atmosphere and dark humour.

 

This rich visual feast demands a viewer's attention with its stunning photography and art direction, with countless memorably framed shots of 18th Century New York, with its foggy woods and small town cobblestone streets. Lurking about, too, of course, is the legendary Headless Horseman who seems to be collecting an increasingly large number of heads of his hapless victims.

 

This brings about the arrival of Crane, transformed by Burton from Disney's spindly school teacher of animation fame into an analytical would be Sherlock Holmes type detective. Only this detective is decidedly squeamish about blood (not to mention spiders) and, on at least one bloody occasion, will pass out. The role is an ideal showcase for Johnny Depp, whose Crane is both darkly handsome and a bit prissy. Depp is truly endearing in his part, an engagingly idiosyncratic individual who will eventually turn reluctant hero.

 

None of the rest of the cast, while capable, make much of an impression next to Depp. A few old timers occupy that cast, however, including Christopher Lee, Michael Gough and Martin Landau. However, Christopher Walken also appears, chillingly, in a significant role.

 

It's a shame, of course, that Burton's skills with narrative story telling are not nearly as effective as his flair for visual dramatics (as unquestionably impressive as the latter are here) and, as far as the story itself is concerned, the film is confused and falls a bit flat. Nor are the horror elements of the story all that horrifying, though this is a film in which the decapitations by the Horseman will keep the heads a rolling. Burton largely treats these moments of bloodshed and "terror" as darkly humourous more than anything else.

 

More than any of the special effects involving the Headless Horseman, what stays with me are Depp's performance and, particularly, the Gothic elegance of this production. That alone makes Sleepy Hollow well worth the investment of a viewer's time.

 

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2.5 out of 4 (dramatically)

3.5 out of 4 (as a Gothic visual treat)

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Sleepy Hollow (1999)

 

That was probably the last Tim Burton movie that I really enjoyed, although I haven't yet watched his latest two (Big Eyes and Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children). I wasn't crazy about the ending of Sleepy Hollow, either. The carriage chase seemed like it was from another movie. But Depp was funny, and the costuming and visual designs were very good.

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Sleepy Hollow (1999)

 

Director Tim Burton's elaborate take on Washington Irving's tale of Ichabod Crane and the Headless Horseman doesn't have much in common with Irving but excels as a Gothic exercise in atmosphere and dark humour.

 

This rich visual feast demands a viewer's attention with its stunning photography and art direction, with countless memorably framed shots of 18th Century New York, with its foggy woods and small town cobblestone streets. Lurking about, too, of course, is the legendary Headless Horseman who seems to be collecting an increasingly large number of heads of his hapless victims.

 

This brings about the arrival of Crane, transformed by Horton from Disney's spindly school teacher of animation fame into an analytical would be Sherlock Holmes type detective. Only this detective is decidedly squeamish about blood (not to mention spiders) and, on at least one bloody occasion, will pass out. The role is an ideal showcase for Johnny Depp, whose Crane is both darkly handsome and a bit prissy. Depp is truly endearing in his part, an engagingly idiosyncratic individual who will eventually turn reluctant hero.

 

None of the rest of the cast, while capable, make much of an impression next to Depp. A few old timers occupy that cast, however, including Christopher Lee, Michael Gough and Martin Landau. However, Christopher Walken also appears, chillingly, in a significant role.

 

It's a shame, of course, that Burton's skills with narrative story telling are not nearly as effective as his flair for visual dramatics (as unquestionably impressive as the latter are here) and, as far as the story itself is concerned, the film is confused and falls a bit flat. Nor are the horror elements of the story all that horrifying, though this is a film in which the decapitations by the Horseman will keep the heads a rolling. Burton largely treats these moments of bloodshed and "terror" as darkly humourous more than anything else.

 

More than any of the special effects involving the Headless Horseman, what stays with me are Depp's performance and, particularly, the Gothic elegance of this production. That alone makes Sleepy Hollow well with the investment of a viewer's time.

 

MV5BMTY4MTA3NzA2N15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTYwMDk1

 

SH-Sets.png

 

7bace-hollow6.png

 

2.5 out of 4 (dramatically)

3.5 out of 4 (as a Gothic visual treat)

 

They just concluded the season's finale of "Sleep Hollow" on Fox a couple of weeks ago.  Like the Ichabod Crane character played by Tom Mison best so far. One think he actually is from the 18th century. Love the theme music by Brian Tyler.

 

Ichabod-Crane-Screencaps-ichabod-crane-s

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That was probably the last Tim Burton movie that I really enjoyed, although I haven't yet watched his latest two (Big Eyes and Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children). I wasn't crazy about the ending of Sleepy Hollow, either. The carriage chase seemed like it was from another movie. But Depp was funny, and the costuming and visual designs were very good.

 

Sleepy Hollow is my favorite Depp film (ok that isn't saying much);  I found him to be very charming and funny without being over the top like he is in some of his other films.    I also a fan of Christina Ricci and to me she was perfect for the role.

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That was probably the last Tim Burton movie that I really enjoyed, although I haven't yet watched his latest two (Big Eyes and Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children). I wasn't crazy about the ending of Sleepy Hollow, either. The carriage chase seemed like it was from another movie. But Depp was funny, and the costuming and visual designs were very good.

 

I agree about the ending, Lawrence. The whole business about the need to explain the mystery of the Headless Horseman is the least of the film's charms.  I've seen three of Depp's films with Burton, the others being Edward Scissorhands and Ed Wood and I have had a very good time with all three. I particularly liked Ed Wood, and was wondering afterward how accurate the film was in its depiction of the relationship between the director and Lugosi.

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