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Sleepy Hollow (1999)

 

Tom, you might want to check out the 1922 version of The Headless Horseman, with Will Rogers. It is a real curio, with Rogers miscast (in my opinion) as Ichabod Crane. The film is fairly dull; however, the ending is a bit creepy.

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Tom, you might want to check out the 1922 version of The Headless Horseman, with Will Rogers. It is a real curio, with Rogers miscast (in my opinion) as Ichabod Crane. The film is fairly dull; however, the ending is a bit creepy.

 

I didn't know there was such a film, but thanks for the notice, Rich.

 

I guess I've done a bit of a variation on Will Rogers' statement, "I never met a man I didn't like." Only in my case it's more like "I've never seen a Will Rogers film I did like."

 

Oh, Steamboat Round the Bend was okay, I guess, but that's about all, John Ford or no John Ford. To be fair, State Fair did have an authentic feel.

 

I find Rogers an acquired taste, and I've just never acquired it. But I wasn't aware that he had any kind of film career during the silents so I might give Headless Horseman a looksee should the opportunity arise.

 

 

P.S.: I see that a print of Headless Horseman is on You Tube. I'll be taking a look at it. Thanks again, Rich.

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"Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs" (2009)--Starring the voices of Ray Romano, Queen Latifah, John Leguizamo, and Denis Leary.

 

Film with breathtaking animation is crippled by overly Cutesy script that has all the subtlety of a Tyrannosaurus Rex, product placements that have NO business existing in the time range of the film ( a "Leggo My Eggo" joke threw me out of the film), jokes that are pounded into the ground, jokes that just don't work, and an overall preachiness that I Disliked.

 

For adult viewers, there's the occasional send-up of movie cliches ("Do I cut the red wire or the blue wire to save my friends life/the Earth/ the Universe?"), an occasional political joke ("Whaddya want, a birth certificate?"), references to other cartoons ( The Flintstones, Scooby Doo), and the quality of the animation, which was what kept me watching.

 

Only John Leguizamo, as Sid, and Ray Romano, as Manny manage to cut through the layers of Cute.

 

Those who don't mind cuteness will enjoy this film.  Those allergic to cuteness may want to give this a look because of the quality of the animation.  Rated C for Cute.

 

Source--archive.org.  Search "Ice Age - Dawn 0f the Din0saurs".

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"Exodus: Gods and Kings" (2014) for the second time.  Wanted to understand the movie better since I didn't record it.  Is anyone glad the pharaoh's so called expert got HANGED?  He gets under one's skin more than some of the plagues.

 

Couldn't happened to a nicer guy (necktie party). :D

 

ben-mendelsohn.jpg

 

 

 

Why did they cast this brat as a "messenger" is beyond me. (anyone got an extra rope?)

 

instagramcapture_697d8cd4-7ad5-432a-a970

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I agree about the ending, Lawrence. The whole business about the need to explain the mystery of the Headless Horseman is the least of the film's charms. 

 

Also, if you read Washington Irving's story, it's teasingly implied there was no horseman (or was there?)  

Disney's cartoon version is much more faithful to the text, where it's suggested that the whole Ride may have been an elaborate prank by town bully Brom Bones to get rid of his competition for the girl, and that Ichabod was ultimately a victim of his own twitchy superstition.  Although, of course, we never know for sure.

 

The scene in the middle of the film where the townsfolk tease Ichabod by faking the Horseman as he crosses the bridge is pretty much where Irving's story ends, period--in fact, it's pretty much all we GET of Irving's story--and where Burton's Made-Up Crap begins...For another hour.

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Also, if you read Washington Irving's story, it's teasingly implied there was no horseman (or was there?)  

Disney's cartoon version is much more faithful to the text, where it's suggested that the whole Ride may have been an elaborate prank by town bully Brom Bones to get rid of his competition for the girl, and that Ichabod was ultimately a victim of his own twitchy superstition.  Although, of course, we never know for sure.

 

The scene in the middle of the film where the townsfolk tease Ichabod by faking the Horseman as he crosses the bridge is pretty much where Irving's story ends, period--in fact, it's pretty much all we GET of Irving's story--and where Burton's Made-Up Crap begins...For another hour.

 

Besides The Legend Of Sleepy Hollow and The Legend Of Rip Van Winkle Irving wrote three similar tales, The Haunted House, Dolph Heyliger, and The Storm-Ship, that are just about as good. 

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"Ben Hur Tale of the Christ" (1925) been a while since I've seen it.  The 2 strip Technicolor scenes were nice, color really stood out. 

 

ben-hur-color02.jpg

 

 

At the end Ben Mankiewicz said about the last remake, Rolling Stones thought it was a flop of biblical proportions! :lol: 

 

Trivia...In 2011 the Messala's winged helmet, worn by Francis X. Bushman in Ben-Hur, was sold at the Debbie Reynolds auction of film memorabilia.

 

Debbie_Reynolds_Auction_-_Francis_X_Bush

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Trivia...In 2011 the Messala's winged helmet, worn by Francis X. Bushman in Ben-Hur, was sold at the Debbie Reynolds auction of film memorabilia.

 

Debbie_Reynolds_Auction_-_Francis_X_Bush

 

LOOKING At the smaller pic on my phone, i have to admit that i had no idea what this was for more than a couple of seconds. that odd, translucent bust looks like some kind of bizarre sculpture made out of discarded breast implants.

 

I always feel the need to chime in when someone mentions the silent BEN-HUR that it is vastly superior to the 1959 version. Like four stars vs. two, and i wish they'd run 1925 instead of the latter version on every fifth weekend afternoon of the year because the latter version suh-huh-huhu-huh-hucks a little harder every time i watch some of it. 

 

if you're looking to get into or convert someone to silents, 1925 BEN HUR is a great start. If you're looking to get someone to never ever ever ever ever ever ever take your advice on anything again, ever, by all means, bring out 1959 for them.

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"The Secret Life of Pets" (2016)--OK animated film from Universal.  Animation is good, not great, same for the voiceover artists (Albert Brooks as Tiberius the Falcon is an exception), the music credits everyone from Vivaldi to Queen, the humor is inoffensive.  Best of all, the Cute Factor doesn't have the sledgehammer touch Ice Age III had.  Film is OK, but I prefer Disney.  2.4/4.  

 

Source--archive.org.  Search "The secret Llfe of Pets".

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Kubrick Remembered - Terrific 2014 documentary look at director Stanley Kubrick. This isn't the typical, linear look at a filmmaker's life and career. This is more about Kubrick the person, and his effect on those around him, as well as his filmmaking process. The movie is comprised of interviews with family, actors, crew members and others who worked or lived with Kubrick over the years. The focus is primarily on his post-Dr. Strangelove output, mainly because those people are still around to be interviewed, but some of his earlier work is also touched on. There are also scores of photos and behind-the-scenes video from his later films. Casual fans will find much of interest, and for Kubrick aficionados, this is a must-see.  8/10

 

Source: YouTube (a pristine, HD copy is currently up)

 

stanley-kubrick-slice.jpg

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"Atlantis: The Lost Empire" (2001)--Starring the voices of Michael J. Fox as Milo, James Garner as Commander Rourke, Leonard Nimoy as King Nedakh, and many others.

 

Disney film is more enjoyable than its' reviews would suggest.  Milo Thatch (Fox) is an academic who lives in the basement of a University in 1914.  His latest plan to find Atlantis is turned down by the University's Board, and Milo resigns.  He goes home to find a mysterious blonde waiting for him.  As the animation goes from bright to film noirish at this point, the viewer can predict the plot from this point.

 

The animation varies from good to very good.  The story is cliched, but well done.  Film seems in a hurry to get to Atlantis and the best animation; that's a nice change from films that dawdle along and never really get started.  The musical score by James Newton Howard is good, although I was disappointed that the only song was during the end credits.  

 

Good animation with some spectacular imagery mixed in, good voiceover work, a good score, fast pacing, and a paint-by-numbers plot equals an enjoyable watch.  Not Disney's best, but far from its' worst.  2.5/4.

 

Source--archive.org.  Search "Disney_Classics".  Restrict results to movies only; link should be the first listed; it was archived February 28th, 2017.  Link has 33 cartoons and 43 movies listed; both lists are in chronological order.  "Atlantis..." is link #72. This Disney junkie has some movies to catch up on.

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"Atlantis: The Lost Empire" (2001)--Starring the voices of Michael J. Fox as Milo, James Garner as Commander Rourke, Leonard Nimoy as King Nedakh, and many others.

The animation varies from good to very good.  The story is cliched, but well done.  Film seems in a hurry to get to Atlantis and the best animation; that's a nice change from films that dawdle along and never really get started.  

 

 This Disney junkie has some movies to catch up on.

 

There's a reason THIS one felt it dawdled along and never got started:  Originally, late-90's/early00's post-Hunchback Disney wanted to get into Great Books, and wanted to do "Journey to the Center of the Earth".  (They also at one point wanted to do "Don Quixote", but after fans nitpicked Hunchback's "dumbing-down", unquote, they didn't want to take a chance with what Spain would say.)

But, directors Gary Trousdale and Kirk Wise thought Verne's book was "too slow", wanted a steampunk pseudo-Verne adventure with "More monsters!" in it, but time and budget by that point only allowed one monster, ie. the robot-lobster thingy they never get around to explaining.

 

So they had to fill in the first half's plot void with stretching business out for supporting "wacky characters", but, er...there's a difference between "Lovable eccentrics" and "Detestable certified mental nutcases who do absolutely nothing for the first half of the movie but school-bully our poor stumblebum hero, literally."  (We're supposed to LIKE the character whose only gag is to give Milo "Two for flinching", just because they help out in the climax?)  

And if they did a little less of it, they might have more time to tell us what the Sam J. Freakin' Hill was going on in the second half of the story.  The video-sequel ("Milo's Return") was the pilot for a Disney Afternoon TV series, had a little more time to give the characters and setup some breathing room to make sense, and is...arguably better than the first feature.

 

There was a three-way battle for "Worst Disney Animated" before Chicken Little came along, and this, sadly, was in the three.  (Adding more fuel to the nutty '01-'03 industry-analyst manias of "Gosh, why aren't audiences going to 2D animateds?...Is it a new sociological trend?")

Still, as one junkie to another, what else do you Need to Catch Up On?--And it's on Hulu with most of post-Lion King Disney, you don't have to watch everything on Archive.org.

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"The Three Caballeros" (1945)--Starring Donald Duck, Aurora Miranda, and company.

 

This was the second film that Disney made to improve foreign relations with South America (the first was "Saludos Amigos" (1943).  "Caballeros" is an enchanting film that's a series of cartoons featuring Donald Duck, and the scenic beauty of South America.

 

Film mixes live action with animation, partially animated scenes with live action, three dimensional animation, all in hues of eye-popping color.

 

I spotted images from the works of Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, Pablo Picasso, and Salvador Dali.  Those who Really know their art history will be able to spot images influenced by other painters.  The last fifteen minutes of the film look to be directly influenced by Busby Berkeley and the surreal imagery of "The Gang's All Here" (1943), especially the dancing cacti.

 

The copy I saw on archive.org was chopped off along the edges; still, film is very worth the watch.  3/4.

 

Source--archive.org.  Search "Disney_Classics".  Link was archived Feb. 28th, 2017, and contains multiple films; "Caballeros" is #39.

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Tom, you might want to check out the 1922 version of The Headless Horseman, with Will Rogers. It is a real curio, with Rogers miscast (in my opinion) as Ichabod Crane. The film is fairly dull; however, the ending is a bit creepy.

 

thank you for this info, i don't particularly care for Rogers, so i might check this out.

 

(unless: does he live?)

 

i gots to recommend the DISNEY version, which is- as i recall- less than an hour and was released as a package with THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS. It's gorgeous, well-narrated by Bing Crosby and scary as Hell.

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i listened to a fascinating episode of SCREEN DIRECTOR'S PLAYHOUSE last night, an hour-long radio adaptation of THE GHOST AND MRS. MUIR with Charles Boyer and Jane Wyatt in the title roles.

 

posting here; as i recall some folks mentioning they were big fans of Wyatt in my BOOMERANG! post and bemoaning the fact she didn't do more movies.

 

 

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i also caught this short on TCM this morning, THE ROMANCE OF CELLULOID, an MGM promo that starts out in decidedly un-PC territory, then becomes a fascinating, but all-too-brief, story of how film is made and processed.

 

it ends up becoming a long coming attractions promo for MGM'S 1938 line-up, some of which ended up being cast with different actors than announced (THREE COMRADES.)

 

 

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i gots to recommend the DISNEY version, which is- as i recall- less than an hour and was released as a package with THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS. It's gorgeous, well-narrated by Bing Crosby and scary as Hell.

 

It's also now available (for how much longer?) on Blu-ray, and if you get the 2-movie Special Edition, https://www.amazon.com/Adventures-Ichabod-Mr-Toad-Blu-ray/dp/B00K7BCWLW/, they'll throw in "Fun & Fancy Free" and the complete Robert Benchley "The Reluctant Dragon", for nothin'.

 

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Tom, you might want to check out the 1922 version of The Headless Horseman, with Will Rogers. It is a real curio, with Rogers miscast (in my opinion) as Ichabod Crane. The film is fairly dull; however, the ending is a bit creepy.

You know there is another film that dealt with The Headless Horseman, but a sound picture in modern times for then, (late 40s or 50s). The only scene I remember is that the Legend Of Sleepy Hollow story was told to a character and that he's walking in a snow storm along a road back to his home and he hears the distant sound of hooves coming closer and closer and the guy is panicking.  It turns out to be a truck or car with it's tire chains partly broken and they are beating against the mud flaps or something

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"The Three Caballeros" (1945)--Starring Donald Duck, Aurora Miranda, and company.

 

This was the second ilm that Disney made to improve foreign relations with South America (the first was "Saludos Amigos" (1943).  "Caballeros" is an enchanting film that's a series of cartoons featuring Donald Duck, and the scenic beauty of South America.

 

Caballeros is better known, but most people don't remember to watch Saludos first, which plays like the travelogue-documentary "featurette" to explain the second film.

 

(Tried watching the 00's "Walt & El Grupo" documentary, but there was too much scenic artwork, and not enough historical context about what Walt, RKO and the Good Neighbor Policy hoped to get out of the junket.

It's only in the end credits that we hear Walt joke about how South America reacted to Caballeros:  "Uruguay complained that all they got was a plane.") 

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You know there is another film that dealt with The Headless Horseman, but a sound picture in modern times for then, (late 40s or 50s). The only scene I remember is that the Legend Of Sleepy Hollow story was told to a character and that he's walking in a snow storm along a road back to his home and he hears the distant sound of hooves coming closer and closer and the guy is panicking.  It turns out to be a truck or car with it's tire chains partly broken and they are beating against the mud flaps or something

 

She, as that would be the very Val Lewton-y scene of Ann Carter lost in the snowy climax of The Curse of the Cat People (1944), thank you.

 

(And then only because the characters lived in upper-middle-class upstate-NY Tarrytown, and teachers and crazy old actresses telling the "local" Sleepy Hollow story to over imaginative lil' Amy might not be the best idea...)

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She, as that would be the very Val Lewton-y scene of Ann Carter lost in the snowy climax of The Curse of the Cat People (1944), thank you.

 

(And then only because the characters lived in upper-middle-class upstate-NY Tarrytown, and teachers and crazy old actresses telling the "local" Sleepy Hollow story to over imaginative lil' Amy might not be the best idea...)

Thanks, I vaguely remembered it. 

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The 39 Steps (1935) directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring  Robert Donat, Madeleine Carroll, Lucie Mannheim. Rewatched this last night, Richard Hannay (Donat) is a Canadian visitor to London. At the end of a vaudeville like "Mr Memory's" show in a music hall, he meets Annabella Smith (Mannheim) who is running away from secret agents after her. He hides her in his flat, but in the night she is knifed in the back. Afraid of both the counter agents and the police he goes on the run to Scotland with some rather cryptic information to try and break up the spy ring. Some great cinematography, with a nice escape sequence on the Firth of Forth Bridge.

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"Daimajin, Monster of Terror" (1966); TCM has it under the name "Majin" and dates it 1968.

 

First, thanks to LawrenceA for making this a subject of a Trivia question; I had never heard of it before.

 

Film is Japanese sci-fi-horror about a statue of a god that comes to life when it is prayed to to overcome evil.

 

I hadn't heard of any of the actors or the director.  The actress who is the High Priestess? Nun? is especially good.  The cinematography by Fujio Morita is especially good.  The music by Akira Ifukube is atmospheric (but the lyrics are untranslated by the subtitles).

 

This movie is several steps up from Godzilla movies.  The special effects vary from passable (the ghosts) to impressive (the god when he gets Mad).

 

I went into this movie with low expectations and was pleasantly surprised.  3/4.

 

In Japanese with English subtitles (the songs are without subtitles).

 

Source--YouTube.

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