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"Return of Daimajin" (1966).

 

Second film in the trilogy is shorter than the first.  It's also set in 1700's Japan, and has basically the same plot as the first (Evil outsiders invade peaceful village that's watched over by Guardian statue.  Outsiders wreak havoc, villagers pray to Guardian, prayers are answered in  spetacular fashion).

 

The cinematography is excellent (I couldn't find the credit on imdb; TCM doesn't list this movie, or not under this title).  The ambitious special effects are by Yoshiyuki Kuroda, the most effective of which is inspired by images from "The Ten Commandments" (1956).  Akira Ifukube contributed a good score, although it sounded familiar from earlier Godzilla films (1962's "King Kong vs. Godzilla?").

 

This film and the first are both filled with crucifixion imagery and fire images; the ingenues' tears seem to be a necessity for setting Daimajin off to restore order and gain vengeance.

 

Again, this film was a happy surprise, especially the special effects.  3.3/4.

 

Source--YouTube.  The print I saw was dubbed into English, although the credits were in Japanese (no subtitles).

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I watched "Stolen Holiday" last night for the third time.  I love Claude Raines as the Bernie Madoff-like Count Orloff.  Also, watching Kay Francis and an assortment of models in Orry Kelly amid art deco sets is a guilty pleasure.  My girl crush on her is growing, especially during early scenes when she has that close-cropped hair.  Watching her make an omlette in the blouse with the voluminous sleeves suspends disbelief. As usual, she ends up with Ian Hunter.  Like Confession, this is a film where he is the good guy, whiile the more interesting  "bad guy" gets all the best lines.  

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I watched "Stolen Holiday" last night for the third time.  I love Claude Raines as the Bernie Madoff-like Count Orloff.  Also, watching Kay Francis and an assortment of models in Orry Kelly amid art deco sets is a guilty pleasure.  My girl crush on her is growing, especially during early scenes when she has that close-cropped hair.  Watching her make an omlette in the blouse with the voluminous sleeves suspends disbelief. As usual, she ends up with Ian Hunter.  Like Confession, this is a film where he is the good guy, whiile the more interesting  "bad guy" gets all the best lines.  

 

I suspect that set decorators would have liked having Ian Hunter appear in one of their films. He would have made their wallpaper look fascinating by comparison.

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Sanctuary (1961) A Southern circa 1920s, William Faulkner's steamy tale. Temple Drake  (Lee Remick, The State Governor's daughter) and her boyfriend, Goodwin, drive to a moonshiner. There, after Goodwin drinks himself passed out drunk, Temple is seduced and raped by a Cajun,  The Candyman (Yves Montand) a bootlegger and pimp.  The Candyman and Temple become lovers and he keeps her in his whorehouse until he is supposedly killed during a bootleg run and a fight with revenuers.  After Temple is rescued she marries Goodwin though she doesn't love him.  The Candyman returns after five years and things get somewhat interesting but not quite enough. 6/10

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And then only because the characters lived in upper-middle-class upstate-NY Tarrytown,

Ahem. Tarrytown isn't Upstate at all.

 

And those of us in the Catskills would generally claim we're not upstate either. (Meanwhile, Western New York has as much in common with the rest of the Great Lakes region as it does with places like Albany.)

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Ahem. Tarrytown isn't Upstate at all.

 

And those of us in the Catskills would generally claim we're not upstate either. (Meanwhile, Western New York has as much in common with the rest of the Great Lakes region as it does with places like Albany.)

 

I'm from Finger Lakes, and learned that anything north of Yonkers is "Upstate".   :lol:

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I suspect that set decorators would have liked having Ian Hunter appear in one of their films. He would have made their wallpaper look fascinating by comparison.

Although not a great picture, Another Dawn has an improbable plot development where Hunter leaves Kay behind while he goes off on some desert military excursion, iwithf younger brother, Errol Flynn left to "look after her".  Whats the poor woman to do when left with that kind of choice?  

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Rubber Racketeers (1942) youtube

 

Not to be confused with Prophylactic Pirates, Rubber Racketeers is an oddball wartime curio dealing with scumballs who replace rubber tires with cheap imitation crap.

 

Our story opens in a defense factory, where our hero, Bill Barry (Bill Henry) uses a machine gun to mow down caricatures of Mussolini, Hitler, and Tojo. He refers to his machine gun as a “j a p exterminator.”

 

Bill has a girlfriend named Mary. (That’s right; if they get married, she’ll be Mary Barry.) While driving home from work, they are cut off by a car carrying Ricardo Cortez, who has just been released from the can after having spent three years in stir. Cortez stiffs Barry for the repairs, then gets the idea of entering the rubber racket.

 

After Mary’s brother is killed by a tire blowout, Bill decides to find the culprits.  As usual, the police are nowhere to be found in movies of this type.

 

Cortez’ girlfriend (the lovely Rochelle Hudson) tries to convince Cortez to give up the racket in the name of patriotism. Nice try. In the climactic donnybrook, Bill’s defense pals beat the crap out of Cortez and his gang. Hudson goes to work at the defense factory and demonstrates her skill at using a “j a p exterminator.” Then we bomb the **** out of Japan … as I recall.

 

Cortez is his usual suave d-bag. John Abbott plays a moron killer named Dumbo who doesn’t speak and plays with rubber rings, which is obviously where Captain Queeg came up with the idea of playing with his steel balls. Alan Hale Jr. shows up as a muscle-bound pal of Bill, and Milburn Stone plays a crook.

 

The movie manages not to be tiresome. However, the filmmakers spared every expense, threatening to fire Stone, and jacking up the price of admission.

 

 

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My grandparents lived in Westchester county and I spent many

a weekend crossing the Tappan Zee bridge which I think goes

by Tarrytown. I didn't pay much attention to it as a kid.

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Ahem. Tarrytown isn't Upstate at all.

 

And those of us in the Catskills would generally claim we're not upstate either. (Meanwhile, Western New York has as much in common with the rest of the Great Lakes region as it does with places like Albany.)

It's not even in The Hudson Highlands, lol.

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My grandparents lived in Westchester county and I spent many

a weekend crossing the Tappan Zee bridge which I think goes

by Tarrytown. I didn't pay much attention to it as a kid.

 

The new Tappan Zee should be done this year. B) 

NNYB170227_12lr_zpsjpuihtfm.jpg

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Palmetto (1998) Just Another Sucker Southern Noir

 

Palmetto%2Bposter.jpg

 

A Southern Noir, from the Sunshine State. Based on the James Hadley Chase novel "Just Another Sucker." Chase had a number of his novels turned into films, No Orchids for Miss Blandish (1948), The Grissom Gang (1971), and others. The film was directed by Volker Schlöndorff (The Tin Drum (1979)) and the screenplay was by E. Max Frye (Something Wild (1986)). The cinematography Tak Fujimoto (Fear (1996)). The bluesy soundtrack was by Klaus Doldinger (Das Boot (1981)).

 

The film stars Woody Harrelson as a framed jailbird who is sprung in order to be recruited to carry out a fake stepmother-daughter fake kidnapping scheme. It all goes Noirsville when Harry gets back with the loot and finds Odette dead.

 

 

Every-time Elisabeth Shue is on screen the film sizzles. She in the running for admittance into the Pantheon of Great Femme Fatales. She turns it on like a **** in heat. She gets a certain wild eyed, out of control look when she's telegraphing obvious sexual come and get it signals all the while the brain in your upper head is strobe flashing danger ahead warning lights. But baby you don't care. 7/10

 

Full review with some screencaps in Film Noir/Gangster page and with even more screencaps here: http://noirsville.blogspot.com/2017/04/palmetto-1998-just-another-sucker.html

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The new Tappan Zee should be done this year.

 

I just drove over it last week & "this year" would be miraculous.

 

I just started watching my "Barbara Stanwyck never seen festival" of 4 titles recorded March 7th. 

 

EAST SIDE WEST SIDE ('49) was my first viewing. I loved it. It is so fun to still have some old movies to discover-especially with a fave actress!!

 

The movie reminded me of Martha Ivers in plot & pace involving a disfunctional person-control freak really. This time played by James Mason. He easily convinces us despite his handsome & classy demeanor, he's a slimeball. And Babs gets to play his well liked, faithful, intelligent wife. 

Ava Gardner and Cyd Charisse were also in the movie -wowie- the women in this movie wear stunning gowns! Both actresses often had limited roles and this was no exception, though both did well making themselves memorable.

 

Ava did a great job as the siren, with an exciting nasty scene near the end. I never saw what was so charismatic about Ava, but she sure acted well in the role of sex goddess. Maybe that moniker just stuck to her from this role, as she filled it out perfectly.

 

Van Heflin is the other major player and as in Martha Ivers, plays the "good" guy. Despite his odd hammerhead shark face, Heflin is another good enough actor to convince me of his charms. 

Notable bit parts featured Gale Sondergaard, Beverly Michaels, William Frawley and Nancy Davis.

 

Mix them all that acting talent with well written dialogue, good photography, well edited, good production and you have that meal classic movie lovers live on.

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Rubber Racketeers (1942) youtube

 

Not to be confused with Prophylactic Pirates, Rubber Racketeers is an oddball wartime curio dealing with scumballs who replace rubber tires with cheap imitation crap.

 

wonder if this somehow inspired THE THIRD MAN in an odd, backdoor kinda way...

 

please tell me that this movie was successful enough the spawn two sequels: GREASE GRAFTERS and STOCKING STUFFERS about the shameless bacon drippings/nylon hosiery black market that thrived on the homefront during the war.

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"My Little Chickadee" (1940)--Starring Mae West, W.C. Fields, and Margaret Hamilton.

 

This only screen teaming of West and Fields keeps threatening to be explosively funny, but never quite reaches that level of amusement.  West is Flower Belle Lee, Fields is Cuthbert J. Twillie.  They meet on a train after Flower Belle has been evicted from town because she aided a bandit who robbed the stagecoach.

 

Film is a series of routines for the two comics.  West is unusually subdued, probably because the censors were watching her every move, but she gets off a few one-liners;

 

While subbing for the schoolteacher, she sees the sentence "I will be a good boy" on the blackboard and mutters "What is this, propaganda?!"  Her version of arithmetic; "1+1=2, 2+2=4, and 5 will get you 10 if you know how to work it".  Her battle with Indians attacking the train is also memorable.

 

Fields' scene with a goat is maybe the highlight of the picture.

 

Hamilton screams and shrieks her way through the film, and is dependably funny.

 

Potentially hilarious film only manages to produce sporadic laughter .  Still a fun watch.  2.5/4.

 

Source--archive.org.

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"My Little Chickadee" (1940)--Starring Mae West, W.C. Fields, and Margaret Hamilton.

 

 

While subbing for the schoolteacher, she sees the sentence "I will be a good boy" on the blackboard and mutters "What is this, propaganda?!"  Her version of arithmetic; "1+1=2, 2+2=4, and 5 will get you 10 if you know how to work it". 

 

Mae%20West%20My%20Little%20Chickadee_zps

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"My Little Chickadee" (1940)--Starring Mae West, W.C. Fields, and Margaret Hamilton.

 

 

It's been a while since I sat through this film but I recall being disappointed by it. It will, however, always be remembered for being the only screen collaboration between two of the iconic figures of film comedy. It's a shame they didn't mesh better.

 

As to which of the two comedians comes off best, I suspect it comes down to towards which of the two the viewer may be more favourably predisposed. For myself, I'm a Fields fan.

 

Some of his best moments in the film, for me, are simply Fields's comments and droll asides coming out of the corner of his mouth, such as when he is a bartender tending bar in one scene.

 

"Squawk Mulligan tells me you buried your wife several years ago," a bar patron says to him at one moment.

 

"Ah, yes, I had to. She died," Fields responds.

 

Fields then tells a tall tale about "Chicago Molly," proudly bragging that he had leaped over a bar to knock her down.

 

"You knocked her down?" says another bartender, "I knocked her down."

 

"Ah, yes, that's right," Fields concedes, "But I was the one who started kicking her."

 

That was the thing about Fields's irreverent humour, be it regarding children or tough dames, neither would be spared his scorn or brags of ungentlemanly behaviour, at times.

 

 

Annex%20-%20Fields,%20W.C.%20(My%20Littl

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...oh, forgot to mention that i listened to THE LUX RADIO THEATER presentation of FIVE FINGERS starring James Mason as a disarmingly suave valet who may be a German Spy and his wife Pamela as Le Countess; a special broadcast for Armed Servicemen overseas (in Korea and Europe, this was 1951.)

 

Really a lot of fun, and it's funny how on some of these, you can sense/hear the live audience's enthusiasm for the story.

 

on youtube and (i'm sure) archive.org; not a bad way to kill an hour.

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The new Tappan Zee should be done this year.

 

I just drove over it last week & "this year" would be miraculous.

You know it was practically brand new (5 years old) when Elizabeth Taylor drove over it at the end of BUtterfield 8 (1960)

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The new Tappan Zee should be done this year. B)

NNYB170227_12lr_zpsjpuihtfm.jpg

Yes, I see an article on it every once in a while. Maybe someday I'll

take a sentimental journey up there. And no, it didn't take a whole

weekend to cross the Tappan Zee bridge.

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I haven't written on here in forever! I've been so busy with my new position at work (Inventory Control Lead!) and it's just been crazy.  May is promising to be even crazier.  My manager is saying that we should be planning to work 7 days a week next month! It'll be tough physically, but financially, it'll be nice to get a minimum of 64 hours at time and a half! Do I be responsible and pay down some bills? Or do I buy a bunch of movies? Who knows?! 

 

Anyway...

 

I watched a few movies recently...

 

Illicit.  This was a 1931 Barbara Stanwyck pre-code that I watched last week.  This film features a very young Stanwyck.  She is the best part of this film.  This film involves a couple who is "living in sin" and very happy.  However, the couple's family and friends, especially Stanwyck's beau's (Dick) father, have been pressuring the couple to marry and make their relationship legitimate.  Stanwyck, a very progressive woman for 1931, does not want to marry because she feels that it'll negatively impact her relationship with Dick.  Stanwyck reluctantly agrees to marry and as she expected, their relationship ends up going sour.  

 

This was an okay film, but I didn't enjoy it nearly as much as I did other Barbara Stanwyck pre-codes, Night Nurse, Baby Face or Ladies They Talk About.  As interesting as the film's premise sounded, it ended up being kind of boring.  A young Joan Blondell also appears as one of Stanwyck's friends and has a hilarious line where she shames Stanwyck for considering to wear underwear on her wedding night.

 

---

 

Tales of Manhattan.  I was really looking forward to seeing this film as I'm a big fan of Rita Hayworth and Ginger Rogers.  I hate to say it, but I thought this film was boring? Maybe I'm missing something.  I just thought it was too long and nothing really interesting happened.  I liked the vignette with Rogers, Cesar Romero and Henry Fonda, but other than that, nothing grabbed me.  

 

Am I missing something?

 

I don't even have anything else to say about this film.  That's how forgettable it was.

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Tales of Manhattan.  I was really looking forward to seeing this film as I'm a big fan of Rita Hayworth and Ginger Rogers.  I hate to say it, but I thought this film was boring? Maybe I'm missing something.  I just thought it was too long and nothing really interesting happened.  I liked the vignette with Rogers, Cesar Romero and Henry Fonda, but other than that, nothing grabbed me.  

 

Try the obscure adult film Tails of Manhattan instead.

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Tales of Manhattan.  I was really looking forward to seeing this film as I'm a big fan of Rita Hayworth and Ginger Rogers.  I hate to say it, but I thought this film was boring? Maybe I'm missing something.  I just thought it was too long and nothing really interesting happened.  I liked the vignette with Rogers, Cesar Romero and Henry Fonda, but other than that, nothing grabbed me. 

Try the obscure adult film Tails of Manhattan instead.

 

Don't listen to Rich here, speedy. Ya see, I've seen that flick he just suggested and frankly I thought it sucked...errr, I mean I thought it was lousy.

 

However, IF you might be into westerns at all, back in the '70s I once watched an "obscure adult film" that I THOUGHT was pretty good.

 

(...but finding a copy of Hard On the Trail  might be a bit tough now days...and it sure as hell won't be found on YouTube)

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"Hellzapoppin'" (1941)--Starring Ole Olsen, Chic Johnson, and Martha Raye.

 

Film is a non-stop series of gags loosely based on the Broadway show.  Film opens with a skewering of  "Ziegfeld Girl" (1941) and rarely slows down.  Other targets are "Citizen Kane" (1941), The Hays Office, sappy love songs and pretentious Broadway shows, to name a few.

 

Highlights include Martha Raye's "Watch the Birdie", a jam session that turns into a wild jitterbug number, and the destruction of a Broadway bound show (the final 20 minutes of the film).

 

This is the first time I saw Olsen & Johnson, and I thought they were funny.  Martha Raye is the funniest performer in the film.  Kudos also go to Mischa Auer as a fake Russian count.  Jane Frazee sings nicely, and doesn't do any harm to the film.

 

Most of the film's gags hit their targets, and those that missed I barely noticed.  Film is a fast paced, fun watch.  3.2/4

 

Source--archive.org.

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"Hellzapoppin'" (1941)--Starring Ole Olsen, Chic Johnson, and Martha Raye.

 

 

In the odd but true category (folks, you're not ever going to see this anywhere else) I came across an autograph album in an antique store once chock full of signatures of show biz stars from the '20s and '30s. The album is dated 1934.

 

Among the signatures I found, this one had to be the most unique because of the drawing that either Olsen or Johnson did on the page. The photos of the two comedians were glued onto the page by the album owner.

 

It's a little bit of a crazy autograph page, I guess, just like Hellzapoppin would later be in its humour.

 

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