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Brian De Palma use of sound and split screens in the prom scene in CARRIE is fantastic.

 

the circumstances of my first viewing of CARRIE (1976) were so unique.

 

i'm not sure if there's anyone else out there who had this happen-

 

i first saw this movie on TBS some time in the late 1980's; this was pre-cinephile Lorna (ca. age 9 or 10), so I DID NOT KNOW WHAT IT WAS ABOUT AT ALL....To compound to this situation, I MISSED THE FIRST 30ish MINUTES OF THE FILM, so:

 

A. I did not know about the extent of the supernatural stuff that had been laid out in the plot

and

B. I sort of thought it was like a nice episode of HIGHWAY TO HEAVEN, or an AFTER SCHOOL SPECIAL...

 

So then, imagine if you will, little 9 year old Lorna, watching on the TV in my parent's kitchen, probably eating frosting out of the can or something like that, all dewy with emotion about Sissy winning prom queen and actually managing to LOOK GOOD RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE 1970'S (no small feat, that!) and making out with William Katt- who was cute in spite of that GD Brillo pad hair...

 

and then the bucket of pig's blood falls and...oh HOLY HELL, EVERYTHING ELSE!

 

It was more scarring than THE MONSTER CLUB or SCARS OF DRACULA.

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I watched MIDNIGHT MARY (1933) for the second time...Loretta Young is so stunning in that movie she takes your breath away.

 

yesterday, I forgot about NOIR ALLEY until late; but I really enjoyed what little I was able to see of HE WALKED BY NIGHT, and Mr. Muller's outro was good, i really really like his set a lot.

 

i also watched a goodly portion of THE FASTEST GUN IN THE WEST this morning, Glenn Ford maybe wasn't that bad an actor...

 

i have been listening to A LOT of classic radio; if I could highlight just three titles- all three are from the series ESCAPE! (and can be found on youtube or at archive.org)-

 

THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER- I was not expecting much from this, but it was an exquisite rendering of the tale with some great acting.

 

EVENING PRIMROSE- this one is NUTS! A struggling writer decides to camp out after hours in a department store and finds that there is a bizarre society of "others" who inhabit the store already.

 

AN OCCURENCE AT OWL CREEK BRIDGE- A thrilling Civil War ghost story by Ambrose Pierce (sp?)- bizarre, dream-like, unsettling- and a startlingly frank look at race relations as well. Startling through and through.

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Fedya said: So you missed the whole part about Lee Remick's panties?

 

When I played in a band and were looking for a name, I suggested: Mrs Manion's Panties

 

That is a great name for a band.  But can you say it without laughing?   (you don't want to upset the judge!).

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Brian De Palma use of sound and split screens in the prom scene in CARRIE is fantastic.

 

Have you seen De Palma's SISTERS, where he also uses split screens? 

 

No, but I saw "Phantom of the Paradise", where he also used split screens--It was basically Early DePalma's one big gimmick throughout his funky 70's years, and did get critics to notice at the time.

 

Unfortunately, when one studio tried taking the new page from DePalma and doing an entire split-screen thriller--"In DuoVision!"--for "Wicked, Wicked" (1973), it...didn't work out quite so well.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070916/

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the circumstances of my first viewing of CARRIE (1976) were so unique.

 

i'm not sure if there's anyone else out there who had this happen-

 

i first saw this movie on TBS some time in the late 1980's; this was pre-cinephile Lorna (ca. age 9 or 10), so I DID NOT KNOW WHAT IT WAS ABOUT AT ALL....To compound to this situation, I MISSED THE FIRST 30ish MINUTES OF THE FILM, so:

 

A. I did not know about the extent of the supernatural stuff that had been laid out in the plot

and

B. I sort of thought it was like a nice episode of HIGHWAY TO HEAVEN, or an AFTER SCHOOL SPECIAL...

 

So then, imagine if you will, little 9 year old Lorna, watching on the TV in my parent's kitchen, probably eating frosting out of the can or something like that, all dewy with emotion about Sissy winning prom queen and actually managing to LOOK GOOD RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE 1970'S (no small feat, that!) and making out with William Katt- who was cute in spite of that GD Brillo pad hair...

 

and then the bucket of pig's blood falls and...oh HOLY HELL, EVERYTHING ELSE!

 

It was more scarring than THE MONSTER CLUB or SCARS OF DRACULA.

 

 

My sister and I also first saw CARRIE on either TBS or TNT (I know the "bad words" were dropped or changed to the "Oh shoot" variety). This was in the 1990s. 

The part that really freaked out my sister was the dream scene at Carrie's grave. Years later I learned that it was actually Sissy Spacek's hand in that scene.

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I had never heard of, much less seen He Walked by Night but had the good sense to tape it to watch after Church.  WOW!

 

I love this kind of Noir which is right up there with other police procedurals like The Naked City, Mystery Street, and The Sniper.  That it was mostly true and done documentary style with narration made it seem like a long news report.  I couldn't stop watching.

 

Seeing old favorites like Whit Bissell, Jack Webb and John Dehner younger than I ever have before was a treat.  Also like TNC we saw the genesis of a long standing classic TV series as in "The story you are about to see is true" and 'The names have been changed to protect the innocent".  All that was needed were those four opening notes of the theme-you know which one I mean.   

 

Why I like these 40's and 50's stories is that all they have in the way of technology are old-fashioned square rotary phones, Underwood manual typewriters and teletype.  The cops must be their own computers using their brains, determination, chalkboards and feet to solve the case.  While I'm sure that modern PCs and smart phones make the job easier it's nice to remember what we humans can do on our own when necessary.

 

Eddie Muller is a good and knowledgeable host and I enjoyed his comments especially when he mentioned Johnny Roselli's role in the making of the movie.  I knew he was involved in the LA mob and married to actress June Lange but yes, this was indeed ironic.

 

Nice surprise.

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My sister and I also first saw CARRIE on either TBS or TNT (I know the "bad words" were dropped or changed to the "Oh shoot" variety). .

 

Its also extra, extra steamy in that locker room during the opening credits sequence when you watch it on network TV.

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"Carry On Henry" aka "Carry on Henry VIII" (1971)--Starring Sidney James, Joan Sims, Kenneth Williams, and Charles Hawtrey.

 

This entry in the "Carry On..." series turns historical films about British history into a bawdy, rowdy bedroom farce.

 

Film starts with a preface saying that Henry VIII had two additional wives, and this is their story.  James is Henry VIII, who has one queen executed and marries a new one just afterward.  James is hilarious as his Henry is a lech who constantly promises a throne to the nearest woman with a good looking bosom--never minding the fact that he's already married.

 

Joan Sims as the French Queen Marie earns Henry's enmity because of her insistence on eating a clove of garlic before having sex and adding the spice to all the food fixed for Henry and the Court.  She does a near perfect vocal imitation of Genevieve Bujold in "Anne of the Thousand Days" (1969).  Sims is extremely funny.

 

Kenneth Williams is Thomas Cromwell, who is busily trying to get as much money out of everyone that he can.  He is driven to distraction by the King's various legal needs and disruptions of his plans for personal enrichment.

 

Hawtrey is Sir Roger de Lodgerley, who is the King's taster, which eventually leads to him being tortured in The Tower of London.

 

I can't quote my favorite line, but my second favorite exchange is this:

Henry, asking Cromwell about Marie's past: "She's been chaste?"

Cromwell, loudly; "Oh Yes!": under his breath, he adds "She's been chased all over Normandy!"

 

Film is an underrated romp through British history.  The more history you know, the funnier the film is.  Very worth a watch.  2.9/4.

 

Source--dailymotion.com.

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Its also extra, extra steamy in that locker room during the opening credits sequence when you watch it on network TV.

 

I think my favorite "hide the nudity" moment is during the edited-for-TV version of SHOWGIRLS, which stars Elizabeth Berkley -- the so excited, so scared Jessie Spano from SAVED BY THE BELL.

 

I seem to recall that there are some "screen paint" undies hiding certain parts when Elizabeth Berkley walks behind a screen. Then  the undies float in the air when she's behind the screen and then re-appear on her when she moves from behind the screen.

 

Or did I hallucinate this????.

.

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"Carry On Henry" aka "Carry on Henry VIII" (1971)--Starring Sidney James, Joan Sims, Kenneth Williams, and Charles Hawtrey.

I can't quote my favorite line, but my second favorite exchange is this:

Henry, asking Cromwell about Marie's past: "She's been chaste?"

Cromwell, loudly; "Oh Yes!": under his breath, he adds "She's been chased all over Normandy!"

 

Film is an underrated romp through British history.  The more history you know, the funnier the film is.  Very worth a watch. 

 

I have to confess, I first started looking up the Carry On series because I was trying to look up the "real" Terry Scott, whom up till now I only knew from his doing

.  (With Sir David Jason as DM.)

 

Scott in the Carry On's usually ended up playing the poor long-suffering no-nonsense assistant to Sidney James or Kenneth Williams, so it was sort of hard to tell that was the same voice--

Here, he plays Cardinal Woolsey, who's been sent to bribe a few officials and tries to find out "What's the current going rate of bribery, these days?"  And when he hears the current rate quoted, Scott's comic overreaction goes into perfect Penfold-esque "Oo, 'eck!" register. 

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I think my favorite "hide the nudity" moment is during the edited-for-TV version of SHOWGIRLS, which stars Elizabeth Berkley -- the so excited, so scared Jessie Spano from SAVED BY THE BELL.

 

I seem to recall that there are some "screen paint" undies hiding certain parts when Elizabeth Berkley walks behind a screen. Then  the undies float in the air when she's behind the screen and then re-appear on her when she moves from behind the screen.

 

Or did I hallucinate this????.

.

 

You did not hallucinate the floating undies! 

 

...Unless I did to.

 

I daresay that the edited for TV version of Showgirls is better than the theater version.

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"Sunshine" (2007) just watched this sci fi / thriller on the Audience channel, never heard of it until I saw the program listed in the Directv Guide.  A sunburned lunatic tried to sabotage a mission to revived Earth's dying sun.

 

I am happy the song "You Are My Sunshine" was NOT played in the movie or is part of the soundtrack.

 

am.jpg

 

 

The spacesuits are wild,  looks like a golden Darth Vader. :lol:

 

4c5cf0669cf21481b894f63088e18383.jpg

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I had never heard of, much less seen He Walked by Night but had the good sense to tape it to watch after Church.  WOW!

 

I love this kind of Noir which is right up there with other police procedurals like The Naked City, Mystery Street, and The Sniper.  That it was mostly true and done documentary style with narration made it seem like a long news report.  I couldn't stop watching.

 

Seeing old favorites like Whit Bissell, Jack Webb and John Dehner younger than I ever have before was a treat.  Also like TNC we saw the genesis of a long standing classic TV series as in "The story you are about to see is true" and 'The names have been changed to protect the innocent".  All that was needed were those four opening notes of the theme-you know which one I mean.   

 

Why I like these 40's and 50's stories is that all they have in the way of technology are old-fashioned square rotary phones, Underwood manual typewriters and teletype.  The cops must be their own computers using their brains, determination, chalkboards and feet to solve the case.  While I'm sure that modern PCs and smart phones make the job easier it's nice to remember what we humans can do on our own when necessary.

 

Eddie Muller is a good and knowledgeable host and I enjoyed his comments especially when he mentioned Johnny Roselli's role in the making of the movie.  I knew he was involved in the LA mob and married to actress June Lange but yes, this was indeed ironic.

 

Nice surprise.

 

 

VERY NICE WRITE UP!

 

I was quite happy to discover that HE WALKED BY NIGHT** is available on TCM ON DEMAND, with Eddie's introes and outroes as well as the CRAZY TRAFFIC SAFETY SHORT that aired afterwards; I think it was called RIDING WITH THE DEVIL and it was shot expertly by Floyd Crosby (Oscar winner for TABU.)

 

Quite the double feature!!!!!

 

I'm glad I saw the ending first (on Sunday, but i missed the first part) because I don't know whether or not i would've had the patience to sit through HE WALKED BY NIGHT otherwise- and that's not a knock on the film, it's a knock on me and my ADD-addled brain. the thing that intrigued me were THE EXTENDED PERIODS OF SILENCE throughout the movie; and even the finale which occurs without much real dialogue. it required REAL VIEWING, and I am not always great at that (but managed for the most part.)

 

Eddie's introduction was the other thing that kept me watching the movie, good backstory that helped pull you through.

 

loved all the fast-edited shots of Basehart (sp?) running with his flashlight through the concrete drains and tunnels of LA; wonder if Carol Reed happened to catch this whilst cobbling together THE THIRD MAN.

 

it's a challenging film, but an interesting film, and it'll be ON DEMAND for a few more days for those of you who wish to watch.

 

 

**- I hate these  "(subject) (verb) BY NIGHT" titles.

makes it so hard to tell them apart.

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"Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" (1973)--Starring Kirk Douglas and Susan Oliver.  Score by Lionel Bart.

 

Thanks to TomJH for mentioning this film in another thread.  This musical television movie has to be the worst of the seven versions of the tale I've seen.  Kirk Douglas is ok when he gets a rare chance to act; his singing should have been dubbed.  Susan Oliver is the lone vocal standout as the barmaid who Hyde abuses; she has the best voice in the cast.  The best of the songs by Lionel Bart sound like leftovers from "Oliver!" (1968), or duds from the worst of Gilbert & Sullivan.  The worst of the score is cringeworthy.  The cinematography is clear as mud.  A misconceived dud.  Skip it.

 

Source--YouTube, in 10 parts.

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"Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" (1973)--Starring Kirk Douglas and Susan Oliver.  Score by Lionel Bart.

 

 

Thanks for the review (and warning), film lover. And congratulations on your dedication in being able to stick out that YT version. I saw it there yesterday but cringed at the poor quality of the image and didn't watch it. Who knows, perhaps your impression of the film would have been a bit better if it had at least been a decent visual image. I had read that Kirk's not bad in the film but the thought of turning this story into a musical sounds terrible. Then, again, there was a little stage hit called Phantom of the Opera but it benefited from some wonderful music that was actually a pleasure to hear. I guess there was no Andrew Lloyd Webber equivalent available for this made-for-TV production in 1973.

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You did not hallucinate the floating undies! 

 

...Unless I did to.

 

I daresay that the edited for TV version of Showgirls is better than the theater version.

 

Thanks, speedracer, for confirming I wasn't hallucinating!

 

I've only seen the edited for TV version of SHOWGIRLS.

In addition to the floating undies there are some interesting dubs that replace the apparently saltier language of the theatrical version. 

"Dancing ain't faking."  (!!!) 

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You did not hallucinate the floating undies! 

 

...Unless I did to.

 

I daresay that the edited for TV version of Showgirls is better than the theater version.

 

Can't wait for November to taste turkey?

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A Hatful Of Rain (1957) Dope & Soap Noir

 

rain-life-06-24-1957-004-a-M5.jpg

 

 

John Pope (Lloyd Nolan) is up from Florida to visit his two sons and his new daughter-in-law. They live in the Alfred Smith housing project in the Two Bridges neighborhood of the Lower East Side of Manhattan. John has bought an option on a beachside bar in Ft. Lauderdale, he's also up to collect the $2,500 that Polo saved up for him to complete the renovations.

 

Johnny Polo (Don Murray) is a Korean War vet and a hero. Polo Pope (Anthony Franciosa) is a bouncer in a NYC bar. Celia Pope (Eva Marie Saint) is pregnant with his grandchild. When John finds out that Polo blew the $2,500 he refuses to speak to him. Polo tells him that he gambled it away but in reality he's been giving to to Johnny who is hooked on heroin. Johnny was wounded in the back and got hooked on morphine while recovering in the VA hospital.

 

Don Murray is compelling as a man with a monkey on his back, Lloyd Nolan is doing his regular schtick, and Eva Marie Saint is still in her frumpish plain jane looking stage quite a far cry from her turn in North By Northwest, it's hard to believe they are the same actress. Henry Silva, Gerald S. O'Loughlin, and William Hickey needed to be utilized a bit more.

 

It all just seems a bit too talky and not enough showy, the apartment sequences seem to drag a lot betraying the films play source. The film comes alive with the lower East Side NYC location shots and dies in the apartment/housing project sequences. 6/10

 

Full review with more screencaps from a Youtube stream here: http://noirsville.blogspot.com/2017/05/a-hatful-of-rain-1957-dope-soap-noir.html

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Renegades (1930).

 

renegades.jpg?w=400&h=610

 

There were a number of minor French Foreign Legion adventures churned out during the early talkies, and the primary interest of this Victor Fleming directed affair for some today is probably in the surprising casting of some of its future famous players.

 

It's a largely turgid Fox production, with Warner Baxter as one of four troublesome legionnaires in jail who gets out, fights for the legion and, along with three of his buddies, deserts it to eventually improbably be ruling over a band of natives, setting up a rival little kingdom of his own in French Morocco.

 

We are apparently not supposed to question why a group of black natives in the desert would allow themselves to be ruled over by a white man, with two white assistants. In any event Baxter spots a former flame (Myrna Loy) who had betrayed him years before as a spy for the enemy (shades of Mata Hari) and has her kidnapped and brought to his camp, where he will seek vengeance upon her by having her treated and degraded as just another camp follower.

 

"Say, are you crazy? You can't treat a white woman like that!" protests burly cohort Noah Beery. After Baxter tells him his sad tale of betrayal, though, Beery then has to be stopped from whipping her.

 

Also mixed into the proceedings is a heavily bearded Bela Lugosi as an Arab chieftain. To be honest I didn't recognize the actor at first (Dracula would make him a star the following year), though his distinctive voice and accent later gave him away to me. Loy escapes from Baxter to become Lugosi's mistress at his camp, constantly trying to goad him into anger at Baxter and his followers. (Now Loy wants vengeance big time upon her former lover, of course).

 

There is much stilted dialogue exchanges and, quite frankly, Victor Fleming is not the master of these scenes that he would soon prove to be at MGM (with the famous Red Dust just two years away).

 

Myrna Loy fans might be surprised at her casting here and, to be honest, the lady is dreadful in her role, constantly shouting her lines of drivel dialogue, in a classic cardboard characterization of a vamp. Best actor in the show: Lugosi as the Arab chief, flamboyantly throwing his Arab garment over his shoulder at one point as he exits a tent. He also has fun with his dialogue, musing how women like to cause trouble for men (which in the case of Loy's character here couldn't be more true).

 

The film's best moments come at the end, when there is finally a bit of action as the legionnaires and Arabs do battle with one another (Baxter, a renegade, conflicted about which side to fight on). There is also a very unexpectedly downbeat ending which took me a bit by surprise.

 

A curio primarily for fans of Lugosi (who will probably be pleased with his pre-Dracula character performance) and Loy, who was an awful (emphasis upon the word "awful") long way from playing Nick Charles's martini mixing bantering wife. What the right bit of casting will do for an acting career (not to mention a script that actually works).

 

myrna-loy-bela-lugosi-in-renegades.png

 

 2 out of 4.

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I've only seen the edited for TV version of SHOWGIRLS.

 

Then you are seriously missing out.

The "fish flop" scene, for example, is- i believe- not included in any network edit.

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Renegades (1930).

 

renegades.jpg?w=400&h=610

 

There were a number of minor French Foreign Legion adventures churned out during the early talkies, and the primary interest of this Victor Fleming directed affair for some today is probably in the surprising casting of some of its future famous players.

 

It's a largely turgid Fox production, with Warner Baxter as one of four troublesome legionnaires in jail who gets out, fights for the legion and, along with three of his buddies, deserts it to eventually improbably be ruling over a band of natives, setting up a rival little kingdom of his own in French Morocco.

 

We are apparently not supposed to question why a group of black natives in the desert would allow themselves to be ruled over by a white man, with two white assistants. In any event Baxter spots a former flame (Myrna Loy) who had betrayed him years before as a spy for the enemy (shades of Mata Hari) and has her kidnapped and brought to his camp, where he will seek vengeance upon her by having her treated and degraded as just another camp follower.

 

"Say, are you crazy? You can't treat a white woman like that!" protests burly cohort Noah Beery. After Baxter tells him his sad tale of betrayal, though, Beery then has to be stopped from whipping her.

 

Also mixed into the proceedings is a heavily bearded Bela Lugosi as an Arab chieftain. To be honest I didn't recognize the actor at first (Dracula would make him a star the following year), though his distinctive voice and accent later gave him away to me. Loy escapes from Baxter to become Lugosi's mistress at his camp, constantly trying to goad him into anger at Baxter and his followers. (Now Loy wants vengeance big time upon her former lover, of course).

 

There is much stilted dialogue exchanges and, quite frankly, Victor Fleming is not the master of these scenes that he would soon prove to be at MGM (with the famous Red Dust just two years away).

 

Myrna Loy fans might be surprised at her casting here and, to be honest, the lady is dreadful in her role, constantly shouting her lines of drivel dialogue, in a classic cardboard characterization of a vamp. Best actor in the show: Lugosi as the Arab chief, flamboyantly throwing his Arab garment over his shoulder at one point as he exits a tent. He also has fun with his dialogue, musing how women like to cause trouble for men (which in the case of Loy's character here couldn't be more true).

 

The film's best moments come at the end, when there is finally a bit of action as the legionnaires and Arabs do battle with one another (Baxter, a renegade, conflicted about which side to fight on). There is also a very unexpectedly downbeat ending which took me a bit by surprise.

 

A curio primarily for fans of Lugosi (who will probably be pleased with his pre-Dracula character performance) and Loy, who was an awful (emphasis upon the word "awful") long way from playing Nick Charles's martini mixing bantering wife. What the right bit of casting will do for an acting career.

 

myrna-loy-bela-lugosi-in-renegades.png

 

 2 out of 4.

 

Also shades of The Barbarian (1932) where a white English woman is mistreated (Myrna Loy) by the eponymous scoundrel (at times) played by Roman Novarro. I haven't seen your movie but I'm guessing that Myrna comes off a little better in TB. A very interesting curio and an early example of palpable eroticism on desert sands. Myrna has a daring bath scene.

Edited by laffite

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A young MYRNA LOY in a bathtub?

 

I've GOT to see THAT movie!  :P

 

 

Sepiatone

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Also shades of The Barbarian (1932) where a white English woman is mistreated (Myrna Loy) by the eponymous scoundrel (at times) played by Roman Novarro. I haven't seen your movie but I'm guessing that Myrna comes off a little better in TB. A very interesting curio and an early example of palpable eroticism on desert sands. Myrna has a daring bath scene.

 

I saw The Barbarian a few years ago, and sort of recall the bathing scene. If I remember properly she was a proper young lady in that film mistreated by Novarro (shades of The Sheik and Son of the Sheik, with Valentino).

 

In Renegades Myrna is just a manipulative, bad person. I kept waiting for a softer side to come out in her character but it doesn't happen.

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Last night on Amazon Instant Video, I watched the entirety of "Beetlejuice" for the first time. The last time I attempted to watch it, I only got about halfway through until I had to leave for rehearsal, and then I never got back to watching it. It was pretty much what I expected from a Tim Burton-directed film. I am a fan of essentially everyone in the film; it was nice to see some of them in a creepier movie than what I was used to. 

 

Another 80's film I watched for the first time recently, was "Footloose" (1984). I think the only film of Kevin Bacon's I've seen was "The River Wild" with Meryl Streep (where he played a villain), so this was a huge contrast. I was struck with the whole ideology of the town, and that they outlawed dancing/music and all other enjoyable activities. What really got to me, was when some of the townspeople started burning books, because in my mind, that's a huge offense. Overall, I was quite impressed with the cast. I need to watch more of Diane Wiest's films... 

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