Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
speedracer5

I Just Watched...

Recommended Posts

The Killer Inside Me (1976) Montana Noir

 

Poster%2BDVD%2Bcrop.jpg

 

Jim Thompson's The Killer Inside Me was written in 1952 it was called "one of the most blistering and uncompromising crime novels ever written, " in the introduction to the anthology collection, Crime Novels: American Noir of the 1950s. In this adaptation the story is moved to Montana and instead of a Texas oil patch peckerwood Lou Ford we get a more "westernized" stoic cowboy version of the character.

 

Directed by Burt Kennedy (The Money Trap (1965), Support Your Local Sheriff! (1969)), and written by Edward Mann (screenplay), Robert Chamblee (screenplay) based on Jim Thompson's novel. The cinematography was by William A. Fraker (Rosemary's Baby (1968), Bullitt (1968)), with Music by Tim McIntire and John Rubinstein.

 

Keach gives us an excellent performance. His exterior calm and collected demeanor is juxtaposed by a stewing maliciousness just under the surface. At first the way Keach is lit is quite flattering, he looks all American down home handsome, then as things start to spiral out of control he's lit in a more sinister way that highlights his cleft lip (probably why he wears a mustache) and makes him look somewhat grotesque, just through lighting.

 

Tyrrell is outstanding as Joyce. Born to play in Noir. Born to play the cheap and tawdry. She seems always off kilter, naturally skewed, with a sleepy bedroom eyes sexuality and a whiskey soaked voice. She's almost as scary sexually as Keach is psychotically.

 

Watching Charles McGraw, Keenan Wynn, and John Dehner do their stuff in this is like slipping into a comfortable old pair cowboy boots. Of the rest of the cast Don Stroud is a real hoot as the slightly goofy Elmer and Pepe Serna is quite compelling as the overly trusting Johnny Lopez.  8-9/10

 

Full review with screencaps in Film Noir - Gangster Thread and with even more screencaps ( a few NSFW) here : 

Edited by TCMModerator1
Link Removed due to Inappropriate Content
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really enjoyed this film when I saw it in a theater. Great write-up but why no love for Jennifer Beal? I think this is where I realized how much she resembled Linda Darnell, and would've done a good portrayal of her in a biopic or other film portrayal of Darnell, if it had been done when Beal was young enough.

 

I agree it is a shame that Denzel didn't do a series of this character.

 

He still could, the series spans the late 1940s into the late 1960s so an older Easy Rawlins would work just like Mitchum did the older Marlowe in Farewell My Lovely

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Curse of the Jade Scorpion (2001)

So, I'm not a huge fan of Woody Allen as a person, but this movie was actually quite enjoyable. It was a take on a bunch of film noirs from the 1940's (one that most likely influenced this one was The Big Sleep). The rest of the leading cast was Dan Aykroyd, the manager of an insurance firm in which Allen works, and Helen Hunt, Aykroyd's secretary who always has time to insult Allen (if you know anything about old films, you'll probably realize just how close these two are, and I don't mean just in the office).

 

The film follows this insurance film as they all try to search for a bunch of lost jewels, not realizing that someone in the office is borderline guilty. The group goes to a nightclub to celebrate Wallace Shawn's 50th birthday, and the entertainment is a "magician" who ends up putting both Allen and Hunt under hypnosis and convinces them to do his will and also that they're in love with each other, with only the utterance of two words: "Madagascar" and "Constantinople" (gee, it'd be a shame if these two words were uttered later in the movie to advance the plot ;) )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

CIGARJOE: The Killer Inside Me (1976) Montana Noir
 
Jim Thompson's The Killer Inside Me was written in 1952 it was called "one of the most blistering and uncompromising crime novels ever written, "

 

 

ME: Jim Thompson is one of my favorite writers of all time, and I've read- and in some cases re-read- maybe 85% of his published output- and it's worth saying that he has written everything from books that i'd rate as without fault to some of the worst stuff i've ever read, but when he's brilliant- he's brilliant.

 

THE KILLER INSIDE ME was the book that reignited my fire for Thompson- which dulled somewhat after THE GETAWAY, which is one-half a GREAT thriller and one-half a real bummer of a book.

 

not that anyone asked, but I'd rate among his best: THE GRIFTERS (a perfect novel), POP 1280**, THE TRANSGRESSORS (a real hidden gem of his, I actually tried adapting my own screenplay based on it until i realized i didn't have the talent to take it on). WILD TOWN (which has a prominent supporting role for the main character in THE KILLER INSIDE ME- psycho Sherriff Lou Ford-  and A HELL OF A WOMAN- which honestly, is one of the funniest black comedies i've ever read.

 

 

 

**- is it 1280? i'm bad with numbers....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

CIGARJOE: The Killer Inside Me (1976) Montana Noir
 
Jim Thompson's The Killer Inside Me was written in 1952 it was called "one of the most blistering and uncompromising crime novels ever written, "

 

 

ME: Jim Thompson is one of my favorite writers of all time, and I've read- and in some cases re-read- maybe 85% of his published output- and it's worth saying that he has written everything from books that i'd rate as without fault to some of the worst stuff i've ever read, but when he's brilliant- he's brilliant.

 

THE KILLER INSIDE ME was the book that reignited my fire for Thompson- which dulled somewhat after THE GETAWAY, which is one-half a GREAT thriller and one-half a real bummer of a book.

 

not that anyone asked, but I'd rate among his best: THE GRIFTERS (a perfect novel), POP 1280**, THE TRANSGRESSORS (a real hidden gem of his, I actually tried adapting my own screenplay based on it until i realized i didn't have the talent to take it on). WILD TOWN (which has a prominent supporting role for the main character in THE KILLER INSIDE ME- psycho Sherriff Lou Ford-  and A HELL OF A WOMAN- which honestly, is one of the funniest black comedies i've ever read.

 

 

 

**- is it 1280? i'm bad with numbers....

 

Yea it's 1280

 

What I like about the 1976 version of The Killer Inside Me is that it seems a bit more realistic violence wise. Compared to the 2010 version. The problem I have with the 2010 version (though I do like the correct time frame of the 50s is the unbelieveable beating that Affleck gives to Jessica Alba, she's like one of those punching dummies with the weight on the bottom that keep staying up it gets too cartoonish. In the 76 version the violence is more real, Keach gives Susan Tyrrell one brutal punch that breaks her neck and it's over.

 

Check out Hit Me (1996)  directed by Steven Shainberg starring Elias Koteas, Laure Marsac, and William H. Macy. It tweeks Thompson's A Swell-Looking Babe in a good way.

 

Also check out This World, Then the Fireworks (1997) starred Billy Zane and Gina Gershon as a pair of very twisted siblings. You may have to shower after this one, lol.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yea it's 1280

 

What I like about the 1976 version of The Killer Inside Me is that it seems a bit more realistic violence wise.

 

YAY! I remembered a number right!

 

I am intrigued by Stacy Keach- he directed every episode (i think) of the old radio show TALES OF THE TEXAS RANGERS, which is one of my favorite radio series- and is very much in Thompson territory- although its Lawman protagonist portrayed by Joel McCrea is on the up-and-up, you occasionally come across a crooked local sheriff or deputy on the show. the acting on it is terrific, and some of the shows are relentlessly violent and even bleak.

 

Thompson's father and grandfather (i think) were both Texas law men (sheriffs maybe?), and I recently read one of his last published novels- KING BLOOD- which was a cartoon of over-the-top violence and sexual sadism for true fans of Thompson only- and he makes his Grandfather ( as i recall it) a prominent (heroic) character in the story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really enjoyed this film when I saw it in a theater. Great write-up but why no love for Jennifer Beal? I think this is where I realized how much she resembled Linda Darnell, and would've done a good portrayal of her in a biopic or other film portrayal of Darnell, if it had been done when Beal was young enough.

 

I agree it is a shame that Denzel didn't do a series of this character.

 

 

He still could, the series spans the late 1940s into the late 1960s so an older Easy Rawlins would work just like Mitchum did the older Marlowe in Farewell My Lovely

 

I can't really say that Beals reminded me of Darnell at all, Arturo. She was fine in her role, though, as was everyone in the cast of Devil in a Blue Dress.

 

Devil in a Blue Dress is a great title, of course, but I don't quite get it since Beals's character does not turn out to be any kind of devil (though she may look it in that killer dress) and is, in fact, more of a victim in the film.

 

I would love to see Hollywood followup on Cigarjoe's suggestion by having Denzel Washington as an older Easy Rawlins. I thought he was terrific in the film and last year's Fences shows that, two decades later, Washington has certainly lost none of his power as an actor and great screen presence. I have found him to be a consistently strong, sometimes great, actor, having seen him now in about twenty or so films.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Meet Danny Wilson" (1951)--Starring Frank Sinatra, Shelley Winters, Alex Nicol, and Raymond Burr.

 

This musical has Sinatra in the title role as a bantam rooster of a fellow, who picks fights with anyone who annoys him, but has a marvelous singing voice.  Winters is Joy Carroll, a nightclub thrush Danny falls in love with.  Nicol is Mike Ryan, Wilson's manager, piano player and roommate.  Burr is a gangster who owns the nightclub where Joy sings, and where Danny gets his big break.  You can guess the rest of the plot from here.

 

Sinatra is in good voice here, especially on "That Ol' Black Magic" and his duet with Winters, "A Good Man Is Hard To Find".  His acting is not good: aside from their duet, Sinatra has zero chemistry with Winters.  Winters does well in her scenes with Burr and Nicol, but she seems angry in almost all of her scenes with Sinatra.  Burr makes an good impression as the gangster Nick Driscoll.

 

From what I've read in Winters' autobiographies and biographies of Sinatra, the two apparently couldn't stand each other, and the film almost didn't get finished.  They both walked off the set more than once, had multiple screaming matches, and during the shooting of a hospital scene, Winters capped off one screaming match with Sinatra during the filming of a hospital scene by throwing a bedpan at him.  It connected.  The film ends abruptly, with the two stars in separate shots, never together in the same scene.

 

Sinatra's and Winters' singing, Burr's menacing gangster, and echoes of Sinatra's actual career  make this worth watching.  2.5/4

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched He Walked by Night which I recorded when it was on Noir Alley.  I really like it and the end in the sewer tunnels was quite exciting.  This was the second time I've seen the LA tunnels - the first time  was in THEM! (no ants in these tunnels - just Richard Basehart).The camera work was excellent.

 

Some other observations:  Eddie Mueller said Joseph Breen and some gangster guy were behind the studio's financing.  Roy Roberts, whom I remember from 50's and 60's tv shows, played Captain Breen.  Big ego,Joe Breen?  I guess enforcing the Code wasn't enough for you.

 

Pay heed immediately when your dog notices something going on.  Do not take time to smoke cigarettes and wash your face.  Dogs are smart and pick up on stuff before humans do!

 

Yes to Richard Basehart; loved him in Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea TV show which my mom and I watched every.week.

 

Whit Bissell - it seems like he's always playing a scientist (mad or sane) or in some related field when I see him.  If I am in an alternative movie world, I want Whit to be my doctor/scientist (preferably sane) or electronics guy.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Taking of Pelham 123 (2009)

 

Director Tony Scott's remake of the 1974 thriller about the hijacking of a NYC subway car makes for involving viewing.

 

This time it's John Travolta as the head hijacker and Denzel Washington as the transit administrator forced into acting as negotiator with him. There are a number of character differences here from the original film, however.

 

Rather than the icy, stoic mastermind played so memorably by Robert Shaw previously, Travolta has fun with his characterization as a loquacious, loud, anger issued hijacker, every bit as ruthless as Shaw but, if anything, even more inclined to suddenly execute a subway passenger because of that anger and then blame the city for it.

 

Walter Matthau was solid in the original version as the negotiator, but Washington's character is more complex, a fine showcase for the actor, as a flawed being, facing bribery charges and demoted from his position to be transit communicator for the subway line hijacked that day.

 

Still, Washington is able to communicate with the volatile Travolta enough to calm him down at times.

 

In addition to being a thriller, the film is also a two actor showcase, as none of the subway passengers or even fellow hijackers are brought to life, at all. This can be a bit of a problem for the viewer emotionally since he doesn't really care too much about the passengers as individuals who now have their lives on the line. Nor does he/she work up any feelings about the hijackers themselves, except for Travolta.

 

Director Scott seems to have a problem, at times, with keeping his camera stationary for more than three seconds. This is particularly true in the film's opening sequence, depicting the hijacking of the subway car, under the titles. With the accompanying sounds of rap music on the soundtrack, there are fast edits, camera swirls, blurry one second images, in which the viewer is trying to keep up with exactly what is happening.

 

Fortunately, though, Scott settles down a bit more after that. Later in the film, though, there is a conversation on the street between the mayor (James Gandolfini) and an assistant in which Scott's camera takes a 360 degree turn around them in their one minute conversation. It left me thinking, was this little trip really necessary?

 

Still, I found The Taking of Pelham 123 (the title of the 1974 original spells out the three numbers in English, while they are numerical in the remake) is a taut, suspenseful thriller, with the performances of its two lead actors helping to maintain the interest. The film's final chapter, though, becomes standard action fare, with an incredible, over-the-top completely unbelievable character turn in Washington. This is a knock on the silly script, not the actor.

 

SPOILER ALERT: One scene in this film captured my attention, in particular. Travolta's character has access to the internet on the subway and discovers that Washington has been charged with bribery. Much to Washington's embarrassment, he presses him on the issue, with the police and transit authorities hearing their conversation over the speaker phone.

 

Travolta asks him about the bribe, to which Washington replies that he is innocent of the charge. Travolta doesn't buy it, and explodes, putting a gun to a passenger's head and telling him he will kill him if he doesn't tell him the truth. Washington's attempts to calm him down are futile and, at the last second, as Travolta counts down to executing the passenger, Washington breaks down and confesses his guilt to the bribery - with all around hearing him, including his own boss.

 

Washington stammers, his eyes glistening, shame clearly upon his face, as he appeases the hijacker to save the passenger's life, saying that he accepted $35,000 to select one subway car design from Japan over another one from Canada. No one around him, including his supervisor, says anything, as Washington lowers his head.

 

Then comes the kicker. Travolta asks Washington what he did with the money. Washington resists replying at first but when Travolta screams for an answer, chokes out that he used it to pay the tuition fee for his two daughters to go to college. The reply moves even the hijacker, stunned into silence before telling him he just saved a kid's life.

 

It's a very human moment, beautifully played by Washington in closeup. He's understated and moving, conveying his high anxiety through small facial gestures and the choke in his voice. In a film full of tense action and exploding violence at times, this little moment of anguish and nobility was my favourite.

 

vlcsnap-2017-05-11-08h51m52s677_zpsuns9d

 

A screen snapshot of Denzel Washington in the confession scene, an unexpectedly lovely scene in an action thriller, fully reflecting his sensitivity as an actor.

 

3 out of 4

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

...Devil in a Blue Dress is a great title, of course...

 

Well, Mitch Ryder evidently thought so anyway.

 

(...sorry) ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"The Deadly Mantis" (1957)  got a kick out of one of the newspaper headlines in the film...

 

Congress Calls Mantis A "Hoax"

 

Even back in 1957 the government had issues with fake news. :lol:

 

Guess it took seeing that for a reality check.

Mantis+monument.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Taking of Pelham 123 (2009)

 

Director Tony Scott's remake of the 1974 thriller about the hijacking of a NYC subway car makes for involving viewing.

 

This time it's John Travolta as the head hijacker and Denzel Washington as the transit administrator forced into acting as negotiator with him. There are a number of character differences here from the original film, however.

 

VUDU On Us just showed the Matthau-Shaw 1974 original last month, and there's just something about mid-70's NYC films, just between Abe Beame and Ed Koch, that can't be duplicated at any other time in history--Imagine remaking "Midnight Cowboy", "Dog Day Afternoon" or "Taxi Driver" in modern NYC.

(And yes, a comprehensive list of Greatest Villains of Movies would have at least three Robert Shaw roles on it.)

 

Denzel now seems to ONLY be playing cool hostage negotiators, but it doesn't capture the 70's Barney Miller days when NY's Finest were NY's Weariest, and being cynical about your city was almost a way of expressing affection for it.

This is one example of how most modern remakes are made out of reading a famous title's plot synopsis in Leonard Maltin's Guide.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"North West Mounted Police" (1940)--Starring Gary Cooper, Madeleine Carroll, Paulette Goddard, and Preston Foster.  Directed by Cecil B. DeMille.

 

Melodramatic DeMille epic about Canada's 1885 Riel Rebellion in Saskatchewan that was led by the Metis (who were part French-Canadian, part Indian), supported by the Cree and Assiniboine tribes, and opposed by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.  The Metis believed that the government of Canada had failed to protect their land, and the Metis wanted to overthrow the government and set up their own government, with the help of the Indians.

 

Into this setting comes Dusty Rivers (Cooper), a Texas Ranger who is after one of the Metis leaders because he killed a man in Texas.  April Logan (Carroll) is a  a visiting nurse who Rivers falls in love with.  Robert Preston is April's brother Ronnie, who is in lust with Louvette (Goddard), the treacherous daughter of Cooper's quarry.  Foster is an officer in the RCMP, who is determined to put down the rebellion and try the leaders in Canada.  He too is in love with April.

 

NWMP was DeMilles' first color film.  It shows.  The color is garish for the first half hour, then gradually becomes more realistic.  The script is full of terrible lines; a sampling:

 

Louvette, to Ronnie: "I love you so terrible bad, I feel good."

 

April, to Dusty: "You're an angel in leather";  Dusty: "I'd look funny in leather wings, heh heh."

 

Ronnie, to Louvette: "You're the sweetest poison that ever got into a mans' blood." 

 

Cooper is acceptable, but looks embarrassed when he has to spout the scripts' love talk to Carroll.  Carroll is ok when she plays a no-nonsense sort, but goes back to silent screen overacting when the script calls upon her to cry (which is too often).  Goddard overacts entertainingly.

 

Don't look for subtlety in this film.  The good guy wears a white hat, the bad guy a black hat.  Look for Lon Chaney Jr., Richard Denning, and Robert Ryan in small roles.

 

NWMP was one of Medved's "50 Worst Films of All Time".  It's nowhere near That bad, but it's not among DeMilles' best work.  A painless way to pass two hours.  2.4/4.

 

Source--archive.org.  Archived as "LegioDeHerris1940Leg".  Has Portuguese subtitles.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"North West Mounted Police" (1940)--Starring Gary Cooper, Madeleine Carroll, Paulette Goddard, and Preston Foster.  Directed by Cecil B. DeMille.

 

Isn't this the film where somebody mentions getting up early for reveille and Cooper thinks they are talking about ravioli?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"North West Mounted Police" (1940)--Starring Gary Cooper, Madeleine Carroll, Paulette Goddard, and Preston Foster.  Directed by Cecil B. DeMille.

 

 

I grew up watching this film on TV so have nostalgic feelings about it. Still, as you pointed out, film lover, subtle it ain't.

 

My favourite line howler is delivered by Russian accented Metis fur trapper Akim Tamiroff after he is shot and dying.

 

"The Big Trapper got me by the neck."

 

Akim%20Tamiroff%20%20North%20West%20Moun

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

scsu1975--Yes, it is.  Exchange is between Foster and Cooper, 20 some minutes into the film. :)

Thanks.

 

Stories abound about this production.

 

Supposedly Paulette Goddard started hawking a "midnight blue lipstick" developed by her and Wally Westmore, after she had seen herself in the film.

 

Lynne Overman, who forgot his studio pass one day, managed to gain entry to the Paramount lot after convincing a new security guard  that he was C. B. DeMille. He also said he could no longer work with Madeleine Carroll because "every time I have to do a scene with her, I get to looking in her eyes, and, well, I just can't remember my lines."

 

Columnist Sheilah Graham lamented that Robert Preston died in the movie, noting he had also died in Moon over Burma, Beau Geste, and Union Pacific. "This gives him a death score of four out of every five pictures. He's a nice boy. I'd like to see him live more often."

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

North West Mounted Police has it all

 

There's Paulette Goddard stealing all her scenes as a tempestuous half breed beauty

 

vlcsnap-2017-05-12-18h03m45s255_zpsqvnqa

 

There's illicit love in a hayloft

 

vlcsnap-2017-05-12-18h05m36s660_zpsdiwph

 

There's Gary Cooper serving a cup of coffee

 

"Look, just sorta surround some of this high lopping java."

 

(No, I didn't make that line up. Cooper says that in this scene).

 

vlcsnap-2017-05-12-18h12m23s703_zpszgdxv

 

There are closeups of Madeleine Carroll and Paulette Goddard together, and you get to judge which one you think is hotter

 

vlcsnap-2017-05-12-18h08m34s002_zpsxgbzj

 

And there's great dialogue

 

vlcsnap-2017-05-12-18h10m19s212_zpsuywbc

 

"The Big Trapper got me by the neck."

 

Curiously, NWMP is the only DeMille talkie spectacle that never got a home video release of any kind in North America (though the film can be found on the internet).

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Audition (1933 Vitaphone one-reeler)

 

Bland bandleader Phil Emerton gives an audition for an impresario, who is unimpressed. Said impresario wants them to bring in some sex appeal in the form of a lady singer, Hannah Williams.

 

Hannah sings "Get Happy" long before Judy Garland ever tortured it. Further suggestions are made for setting the band on location, which has them in overalls on a levee while girl group the X Sisters sing over stock footage.

 

One more suggestion involves having novelty tap dancers (Larry & Larry), before the inane punch-line to this whole dreck is given.

 

Emerton never made another movie, according to IMDb. Neither did Williams, playing herself. Larry & Larry also never showed up anywhere else, while the X Sisters apparently have three other credits.

 

Dreadful. 0/10.

 

It's on the DVD of The Mayor in Hell, or at least the one that's part of the Warner Bros. Gangster Collection (Vol. 3), and The Mayor of Hell is worth it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Audition (1933 Vitaphone one-reeler)

 

So no one cuts off any limbs with piano wire in that one?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't this the film where somebody mentions getting up early for reveille and Cooper thinks they are talking about ravioli?

 

He had this same problem with pasta in Marco Polo when he thought a bowl of spaghetti was snakes.  Maybe this is why he was never miscast as a Mafia boss like Jason Robards' "Al Capone" in The St. Valentine's Day Massacre

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"La La Land"  (2016) starring Emma Stone, Ryan Gosling and John Legend.

 

Good chance to see this movie again on the big screen as it ends its theater run.  Good date night film, some solid songs by the cast.  I'm not as big on this film as maybe some others, maybe it's because i'm such a fan of musicals, but still a well made movie with a good cast and GREAT cinematography.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two great white sharks.   Went to Dana Point CA for a swim but I didn't stay in the water long!

 

I'm not a fan of drones (often a total invasion of privacy),  but at the beach they were useful for spotting the sharks and alerting us swimmers to get out of the water.  

 

Seeing a large fin out in the water about 100 feet away gets one's blood flowing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Dogora" (1964)--Directed by Ishiro Honda.

 

First, thanks to LawrenceA for mentioning this in a Trivia question; I had never heard of the film.

 

Japanese caper/monster from Space movie.  Monster lives on carbon and diamonds, makes humans levitate, and eats through safes to get diamonds.  Its' first form is like a shiny silver doorknob, but after eating more coal, it mutates into what looks like a giant green octopus/squid in the sky.  It vacuums up any coal or diamonds in the vicinity.

 

There are the requisite scenes with screaming, panicking villagers.  The heist plot thread is mostly filler until the monster strikes again.  The special effects vary from inept (the miniature work) to oddly beautiful ( the Thing(s) in the sky).  Watch the clouds around the monster--one of the clouds has the face of a screaming woman.  Film has too much talk, the characters are horrendous shots, and the dubbing is lousy.  Still, for Creature Movies, this one isn't bad; I've seen much worse.  2.4/4

 

Source--archive.org.  Archived as "Space Monster Dogora".  Opening credits are in untranslated Japanese; end credits are in English.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


© 2019 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...