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"The Deadly Mantis" (1957)  got a kick out of one of the newspaper headlines in the film...

 

Congress Calls Mantis A "Hoax"

 

Even back in 1957 the government had issues with fake news. :lol:

 

Guess it took seeing that to for a reality check.

Mantis+monument.jpg

Watched it last night, a real hoot.

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"Left Behind" (2000) this is not the remake with Nicolas Cage.  Millions disappeared leaving their clothes behind. A bit funny the only one left in the church was the pastor.  Apparently he didn't believed what was preached.

 

hqdefault.jpg

 

 

Nicolae Carpathia is the antichrist.

 

400px-LeftBehindGlock17.jpg

Edited by hamradio

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"Left Behind" (2000) this is not the remake with Nicolas Cage.  Millions disappeared leaving their clothes behind. A bit funny the only one left in the church was the pastor.  Apparently he didn't believed what was preached.

 

No offense meant to anyone's personal beliefs, but this movie and its sequels are terrible. I just watched the Nick Cage version the other day, and it was nearly as bad. And not funny bad, just bad bad.

 

For some humorously bad religious viewing, try The Omega Code, or even better, The Judas Project.

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No offense meant to anyone's personal beliefs, but this movie and its sequels are terrible. I just watched the Nick Cage version the other day, and it was nearly as bad. And not funny bad, just bad bad.

 

For some humorously bad religious viewing, try The Omega Code, or even better, The Judas Project.

 

IT'S FUNNY THAT YOU MENTION THIS, as I watched parts of GOD'S (NOT) DEAD on some network in the cable wilderness this morning.

 

It's kind of like nitrous oxide- good for a delirious, continuous laugh until your head starts to hurt, and then you should lay off for a while and drink some water.

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hamradio, on 14 May 2017 - 12:48 AM, said:

 

"Carpathia is the antichrist."

 

As in Carpathian Mountains?  As in "Dracula" (1931), "The Wolfman" (1941), etc. to "The Howling II: Your Sister Is A Werewolf" (1985)??

 

Or as in the R.M.S. Carpathia, the ship that rescued the R.M.S. Titanic's survivors in 1912?

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As in Carpathian Mountains?  As in "Dracula" (1931), "The Wolfman" (1941), etc. to "The Howling II: Your Sister Is A Werewolf" (1985)??

 

LOOK BUDDY!

YOU DON'T KNOW MY SISTER!

MY SISTER IS A SAINT!

 

....and she's a chupacabra, not a werewolf. get your **** straight.

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hamradio, on 14 May 2017 - 12:48 AM, said:

 

"Carpathia is the antichrist."

 

As in Carpathian Mountains?  As in "Dracula" (1931), "The Wolfman" (1941), etc. to "The Howling II: Your Sister Is A Werewolf" (1985)??

 

Or as in the R.M.S. Carpathia, the ship that rescued the R.M.S. Titanic's survivors in 1912?

 

The character is Nicolae Jetty Carpathia, played by Gordon Curry.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gordon_Currie

 

Like to add another funny thing in the film, Nicolae Carpathia came up with an explanation the missing people were due to radiation and they bought it!  Kind of reflects people's gullibility in the real world.

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No offense meant to anyone's personal beliefs, but this movie and its sequels are terrible. I just watched the Nick Cage version the other day, and it was nearly as bad. And not funny bad, just bad bad.

 

For some humorously bad religious viewing, try The Omega Code, or even better, The Judas Project.

 

Well it's a made for television  / direct to video type of film, what do you expect.  I'm yet to see ANY that can rival theatrical movies.  I watched it because there was nothing else on.

 

Bruce Springsteen need to upgrade his "57 Channels and Nothin On" song to 300. ;) 

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Well it's a made for television  / direct to video type of film, what do you expect.  I'm yet to see ANY that can rival theatrical movies.

 

It was intended to be a major theatrical release, as those books were major bestsellers, but the production company dropped the ball and the film was terrible, so they dumped it on video, and tried doing a circuit of screenings for church groups. Before its release, the film was being touted in major outlets as being the first in a new wave of Christian blockbusters. That's not how it worked out, although the 00's did see an increase in religious themed and inspirational films that had moderate success (and of course there's Passion of the Christ, but that's another story). 

 

Since the newer, larger budgeted film was also awful, it's possible that the trouble may lie more with the source material. Either way, even the book's co-author Tim LaHaye saw how bad those Kirk Cameron versions were, and sued to get the rights back.

 

The Kirk Cameron version has 16% out of a possible 100 on Rotten Tomatoes. The Nick Cage version is at 2%.

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It was intended to be a major theatrical release, as those books were major bestsellers, but the production company dropped the ball and the film was terrible, so they dumped it on video, and tried doing a circuit of screenings for church groups. Before its release, the film was being touted in major outlets as being the first in a new wave of Christian blockbusters. That's not how it worked out, although the 00's did see an increase in religious themed and inspirational films that had moderate success (and of course there's Passion of the Christ, but that's another story). 

 

Passion's ballot-stuffed box-office opening created "Passionistas", a devoted cult trying to spin-doctor movie headlines of "Religion at the box office!  Are audiences returning to more faith-based movies?"  New Line tried producing "The Nativity Story", and the mainstream answer turned out to be "No".  (The idea of "Let's theatrically re-release Passion every Easter!" also tanked rather spectacularly the next year, since this was before Fathom.)

But Left Behind had started a marketing wave of every Religious-right film entrepreneur to cash in on Millennial-Apocalypse fear-mongering (which all seemed to have a suspiciously, ahem, critical view of Israel's Middle-East troubles), and try to to take down the big boy on the block--Critics saw through the ploy of red-state churches attempts to "grab" movie-marketing money for their exclusive audience, and accused Revelations-thriller producers of cynically "Trying to beat Hollywood at its own game".

And since this was back when the Southern Baptists were on their early-00's Hollywood Is Evil campaign, they took it as a compliment, and plastered the blurb all over Omega Code's front cover.

 

Nowadays, except for the teen or Nic Cage attempts to "reboot" Left Behind (which is what they do to expired 90's-00's fads), most of the "faith-based" movie industry tries to follow the sports lead of "The Blind Side", the stranger-makes-town-more-cuddly lead of "Heaven Is For Real" or public persecution-complexes of "God's Not Dead", and are used as filler or counter programming where no one will notice them.

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"Jet Pilot" (1957)--Starring John Wayne and Janet Leigh.  Directed by Josef von Sternberg and seven different assistant directors.

 

Movie was filmed in 1950, and not released until 1957 due to producer Howard Hughes dissatisfaction with the finished film.  He tinkered with various scenes for seven years, until the new aircraft he had wanted to showcase in 1950 was outdated by the time of the film's release.

 

Very disappointing, boring film was scripted by Jules Furthman.  It plays like a airborne remake of "Ninotchka" (1939) and 1950 anti-Communist philosophizing.  

 

Wayne plays Col. Jim Shannon of the Air Force. He and his squadron spot a Russian plane,flown by Olga (Leigh).  After getting her plane to land at the Air Force base, and questioning her, he falls in love with her.  After courting her at the Pentagon's behalf, so she will let information about Russia slip, he finds out she's a spy.  The plot then goes into comic book territory, and loses all credibility and interest.

 

The script is the main problem.  It changes tone from scene to scene, veering from far-fetched melodrama to crude comedy and back.  Wayne plays his persona, not his character.  Leigh goes from being brainy to being a "dumb blonde", with no explanation.  The two do the best they can to be amusing.

 

I can barely tell von Sternberg directed the movie.  The only sign of him is the many loving closeups Leigh is given.  Winton C. Hoch directed the  beautiful cinematography.  Bronislau Kaper's score is more amusing than the script.

 

Film may be of interest to aviation buffs, and Wayne/Leigh/von Sternberg completists.  All others beware.    2/4.

 

Source--archive.org.

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...Rik Mayall?

No. It's Johnny Rotten. I guess there is a bit of a

resemblance, though not the separated at birth

kind.

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The Reelz Channels has presented several documentaries on the Charles Manson family murders.

 

"Charles Manson: A Life of Scandal" was quite detailed and graphic.

 

charles-manson-national-enquirer-investi

 

 

Trivia....the words Helter Skelter is older than one thinks, The song "Old Straw Hat" sung by Shihley Temple in 1937 had the words...

What is all this dizzy busy hustling for. People running helter-skelter on their way. :blink: 

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Trivia....the words Helter Skelter is older than one thinks, The song "Old Straw Hat" sung by Shirley Temple in 1937 had the words...

What is all this dizzy busy hustling for. People running helter-skelter on their way. :blink: 

 

A helter skelter is also an amusement park ride, one that dates back to at least 1905. It was the ride the Beatles were referring to in the song, one whose meaning was later warped by Manson's family.

 

helter-skelter-2.jpg

 

 

The term "helter-skelter" as used in the Temple song, meaning to move about in a confused or careless way, goes back to at least the late 16th century.

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Trivia....the words Helter Skelter is older than one thinks

 

You thought it a relatively modern phrase? 

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"Godzilla vs. Mothra: The Battle For Earth" (1992)--Starring the title creatures, and Introducing Battra.

 

A meteorite falls from the sky into the "Ogasawara Trench" in the Pacific Ocean.  It awakens Godzilla, and Battra ( a sea going monster with a huge horn in its' forehead, and spikes for skin).  The meteorite inspires an atoll to pop up and expand into an island.  Cut to an Indiana Jones wanna-be, who is busily robbing an ancient tomb somewhere in Indonesia.  After he gets the relic he wants, and escapes from the trap his thievery sets off, he's caught by government men and jailed.  After being freed from jail by a company that wants his relic, He and his ex-wife, who works for the company, go to the new island, "Infant Island".  There they find a giant, multi-hued egg, and discover mini twins, (they're called The Cosmos in this movie) who live in a flower, and will translate the various noises the Monsters make.  A ship is hired to take the Egg back to Tokyo.  It Hatches on the way back.  That's the first 15 minutes or so; you can guess the rest of the plot.

 

Let's see; The Cosmos sing four songs to Mothra, in untranslated Japanese;  Battra's red eyes shoot red lasers, which kill everything they touch;  Godzilla shoots blue lasers from his mouth that make things explode, and which whitens his teeth ( he ought to patent that); and Mothra shoots white..stuff that forms a cocoon for him when he's ready to evolve, or which immobilizes his enemies.  When Battra and Mothra have morphed into their flying forms, they are actually beautiful ( as long as the camera doesn't get too close). Nagoya (sp?), Tokyo, and Yokohama get stomped in this one.

 

Overlong, overcomplicated Creature Feature is still enjoyable.  2.8/4.

 

Source--archive.org.  Archived as "GodzillaVs.MothraBattleForEarth".

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Bad (Andy Warhol's) (1977) Transgressive Underground Neo Noir

 

poster.jpg

 

Crossing into John Waters territory Bad is a product of some of the various underground film movements that flourished in the early 1970s to the mid 1980s. Cinema of Transgression, was a term coined by Nick Zedd in 1985, to describe a New York City-based underground film movement that employed shock value and black humor in their films.

 

Working out of  Andy Warhol's Factory, director Jed Johnson (who was editor for Heat (1972), Flesh for Frankenstein (1973), Blood for Dracula (1974), editor and cinematographer for L'Amour (1973), cinematographer for Women in Revolt (1971)), filmed this "bizzaro," one off, Transgressive Neo Noir.

 

Carroll Baker twenty some odd years down the road from her Baby Doll turn is excellent as the matronly, somewhat heftier, Hazel. Her performance is matter of fact deadpan as she juggles the outlandish, absurd, and at times morbid details of her two jobs efficiently. She even services her hit gals electrolysis needs, deducting the cost from their fees. Susan Tyrrell does a complete 180 from the previous years The Killer Inside Me, in this she is a bewildered, dowdy, mousy, bellyacher, and the mother daughter tête-à-têtes with Hazel are highly amusing.

 

Perry King in a believable performance provides the beefcake, Stefania Casini is standoffish and deliciously wicked as the cheesecake, and seriously whacked Glenda and Marsha's sisterly bickering will get you chuckling. Watch for Charles Welsh as the blind newsdealer whom Hazel tries scam out of change for a five after handing him a one dollar bill.

 

A very bizarre film that fits in nicely with Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964), Seven Beauties (Pasqualino Settebellezze) (1975), Eating Raoul (1982), After Hours (1985) Delicatessen (1991), Fatal Instinct (1993), The Big Lebowski (1998), Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (2005), Sin City (2005), Sin City: A Dame To Kill For (2014) the delightfully ludicrous black comedy sub genre of Neo Noir.

 

The Cheesy Films DVD (2005). Be forewarned this film can get pretty gross and will definitely not be for everyone 6.5-7/10 Full review in Film Noir/Gangster.

 

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....FOR THE LOVE OF SPOCK (2016)

 

A tribute film by his son, Adam Nimoy.

At best the film uses film clips, Leonard's voice over and letters to tell his story of a talented hard working actor.

Most interesting aspects covered are already well known to Trekkies, such as Nimoy's contribution to the charactor of Spock including the "mind meld" the "Vulcan taser" the hand greeting and even his delivery of "fascinating".

Some of the most fun clips are from Shatner's 2001 film MIND MELD where both stars reminisce together.

 

Nimoy's personal life and his other very successful roles are also covered. It's fun seeing the real man just being a regular person instead of the charactor as we all know him.

 

What really ruins this film is the endless musings and opinions of others that do not contribute to Leonard Nimoy's story. It seems like any random celebrity who agreed to be interviewed was included, like....Jason Alexander?

Really? 

 

Sure, Nimoy's brilliant portrayal of Spock was the role of a lifetime and propelled his career into our consciousness & popular culture. But to interview every distant celebrity that "Spock" influenced wastes a lot of precious screen time, loses focus on Nimoy the person and becomes a real bore. Even the actor who plays a "young" Spock in the new movie franchise is given "opinion" screen time. 

 

Watching became a chore and I turned it off before completing the last 20-25 minutes.

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I've watched quite a few "new" and new movies recently and haven't had a chance to write about them. I'm sitting here at work, bored in one of our other warehouses and I figured I'd write about what I'd seen. I'm writing in my phone, so forgive me for formatting and such.

 

"The Story of Three Loves." This was another of Bob's picks and in the same vein as "Tales From Manhattan," (which I didn't get much out of), the story of the film was told in vignettes. In "The Story of Three Loves," there were three stories. One about James Mason's love of Moira Shearer and Moira's love of ballet, even though she has a health condition that could prove fatal if Moira continues to dance. Agnes Moorehead plays Moira's aunt. She's excellent in this small role, even if it's not the juiciest part she's had. I liked Mason in this film. His love was tragic and he conveyed that well. Plus, he has such a great voice. I am unfamiliar with Moira Shearer, I only know that she was in "The Red Shoes" (which I haven't seen).

 

The second story in this film featured Leslie Caron, Ethel Barrymore, Farley Granger and a very young Ricky Nelson. Caron plays Ricky's governess who is not only trying to teach him French, but she's also trying to get him to develop an appreciation for poetry. Ricky, being a 12-year old boy could not care less about French or poetry. Ricky's friend dares him to go to next door to Barrymore's home. She has a reputation among the town's children as being a witch. Ricky goes there and finds out that the rumors are true. Barrymore encourages Ricky to make a wish and casts a short term Cinderella like spell on him. Ricky wishes he were a grown up. Soon, he transforms into Farley Granger. Then the story gets a little weird. The young boy (now adult Farley Granger) falls in love with Leslie Caron!

 

My favorite story was the third story featuring Kirk Douglas and Pier Angeli. I had heard of Pier, but I had never seen her in a film. She was very pretty and excellent in this film. It's tragic that she died so young. In this story, Kirk Douglas plays a former trapeze artist who retires after his partner dies in a horrific trapeze accident. She was trying to perform a stunt that Kirk's character had designed. One day, while out in town, Kirk witnesses a woman, Pier, trying to commit suicide by jumping off a bridge. Kirk rescues her. Soon, they get talking about their respective depression and Kirk decides to get his trapeze act going again and decides to recruit Pier into the act. She's the perfect partner, she has no fear of dying. Kirk trains her from scratch. Kirk and Pier have a great chemistry in their training and the vignette culminates with Kirk and Pier performing the dangerous stunt (sans net) that killed Kirk's former partner. This was the best story of the three.

 

"Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid." This was a very interesting film, especially an interesting film for William Powell. This is a fantasy film and features Powell as a soon to be 50-year old man who is having a bit of a mid-life crisis but not as big a crisis as everyone around him thinks he's having. The film is told as a flashback with Powell explaining to a psychologist about the mermaid he fell in love with while on vacation. We flashback to Powell's vacation and see him fishing. He's hooked a big fish and he struggles awhile trying to catch it. Finally he pulls his prize onto his boat, only to discover that he's hooked himself a beautiful mermaid, portrayed by Ann Blyth. Blyth has no dialogue in this film. She sings and makes little noises, but does not speak. She's excellent at conveying a wide array of emotions with facial expressions and gestures. Powell decides to keep his mermaid a secret and hides her in what may be the biggest hotel pond in the world. At some point, everyone decides Powell is having an affair and is also going through some major crisis. This was a really fun film that I enjoyed immensely.

 

Part Two of my post to follow later...

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I've watched quite a few "new" and new movies recently and haven't had a chance to write about them. I'm sitting here at work, bored in one of our other warehouses and I figured I'd write about what I'd seen. I'm writing in my phone, so forgive me for formatting and such.

 

"The Story of Three Loves." This was another of Bob's picks and in the same vein as "Tales From Manhattan," (which I didn't get much out of), the story of the film was told in vignettes. In "The Story of Three Loves," there were three stories. One about James Mason's love of Moira Shearer and Moira's love of ballet, even though she has a health condition that could prove fatal if Moira continues to dance. Agnes Moorehead plays Moira's aunt. She's excellent in this small role, even if it's not the juiciest part she's had. I liked Mason in this film. His love was tragic and he conveyed that well. Plus, he has such a great voice. I am unfamiliar with Moira Shearer, I only know that she was in "The Red Shoes" (which I haven't seen).

 

The second story in this film featured Leslie Caron, Ethel Barrymore, Farley Granger and a very young Ricky Nelson. Caron plays Ricky's governess who is not only trying to teach him French, but she's also trying to get him to develop an appreciation for poetry. Ricky, being a 12-year old boy could not care less about French or poetry. Ricky's friend dares him to go to next door to Barrymore's home. She has a reputation among the town's children as being a witch. Ricky goes there and finds out that the rumors are true. Barrymore encourages Ricky to make a wish and casts a short term Cinderella like spell on him. Ricky wishes he were a grown up. Soon, he transforms into Farley Granger. Then the story gets a little weird. The young boy (now adult Farley Granger) falls in love with Leslie Caron!

 

My favorite story was the third story featuring Kirk Douglas and Pier Angeli. I had heard of Pier, but I had never seen her in a film. She was very pretty and excellent in this film. It's tragic that she died so young. In this story, Kirk Douglas plays a former trapeze artist who retires after his partner dies in a horrific trapeze accident. She was trying to perform a stunt that Kirk's character had designed. One day, while out in town, Kirk witnesses a woman, Pier, trying to commit suicide by jumping off a bridge. Kirk rescues her. Soon, they get talking about their respective depression and Kirk decides to get his trapeze act going again and decides to recruit Pier into the act. She's the perfect partner, she has no fear of dying. Kirk trains her from scratch. Kirk and Pier have a great chemistry in their training and the vignette culminates with Kirk and Pier performing the dangerous stunt (sans net) that killed Kirk's former partner. This was the best story of the three.

 

"Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid." This was a very interesting film, especially an interesting film for William Powell. This is a fantasy film and features Powell as a soon to be 50-year old man who is having a bit of a mid-life crisis but not as big a crisis as everyone around him thinks he's having. The film is told as a flashback with Powell explaining to a psychologist about the mermaid he fell in love with while on vacation. We flashback to Powell's vacation and see him fishing. He's hooked a big fish and he struggles awhile trying to catch it. Finally he pulls his prize onto his boat, only to discover that he's hooked himself a beautiful mermaid, portrayed by Ann Blyth. Blyth has no dialogue in this film. She sings and makes little noises, but does not speak. She's excellent at conveying a wide array of emotions with facial expressions and gestures. Powell decides to keep his mermaid a secret and hides her in what may be the biggest hotel pond in the world. At some point, everyone decides Powell is having an affair and is also going through some major crisis. This was a really fun film that I enjoyed immensely.

 

Part Two of my post to follow later...

I just had to comment on these two films. I love The Story of Three Loves and prefer the vignette with James Mason and Moira Shearer. I agree that Mr. Mason had a distinctive style of acting and a commanding presence. Also, his speaking voice added to his wonderful delivery of his lines. I read an article which was written by a fan some years ago and it sums it all up; his brilliance and charm. This lady said she would fall for him even if he read from the phone book! She loved his looks, his voice, and acting style. I agree that Agnes Moorhead was wonderful in her small role as the aunt of the fated ballerina. She knew the secret of her niece's reluctance to dance. Yet, she couldn't help dancing, for love of the art as well for the ballet impresario portrayed by James Mason. I also love the vignette with Leslie Caron and Farley Granger. Ethel Barrymore was delightful there as a magical elderly woman.

 

 

MR. Peabody and the Mermaid is one of my favorite fantasy films about mermaids. I saw it long ago as a child on TV and was quite entranced by Ann Blyth, the charming mermaid who did convey her feelings by facial expressions. Are we to conclude that William Powell's character did briefly fall in love with a mermaid? His wife was out of town and the mermaid was in the bathtub, delighted with some combs he had given her. Sadly, she vanished later when his wife returned. All sorts of comic adventures ensue while the mermaid is there, as she develops a jealousy of a woman who flirts with William Powell. Later in his talk with a psychiatrist, he concludes it was a mid-life crisis that brought on this lovely encounter.

I still believed in mermaids at 5 or 6 when I first saw this lovely film.

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"Saskatchewan" (1954)--Starring Alan Ladd and Shelley Winters.  Directed by Raoul Walsh.

 

Entertaining Northern, set in 1877 Canada,  after Custer's Last Stand.  Thomas O'Rourke (Ladd) discovers the burnt remains of an covered wagon and dead bodies.  He finds Grace (Winters) who is the sole survivor of the attack.  On their way to the nearest fort, the Indians attack again.  This time they are successfully driven off. The film follows a predictable path from there.

 

The main attraction of the film is the beautiful cinematography by John Seitz.  The film was almost completely shot in Canada. 

 

Ladd and Winters play their roles with deadpan humor and are fun to watch.  Walsh's direction is well paced, fitting in all the plot while not hurrying the film--until the last ten minutes, when the plot falls apart and the movie lurches to the finish line. Maybe Universal went over budget and cut some scenes?

 

Anyway, film is an entertaining watch.  2.6/4.

 

Source--archive.org.

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"Saskatchewan" (1954)--Starring Alan Ladd and Shelley Winters.  Directed by Raoul Walsh.

 

 

Saskatchewan was filmed in Banff National Park, Alberta. I don't know that any of the crew placed a single foot during filming in the Canadian province next door, Saskatchewan (in spite of the film's epilogue thanking the people of that province for their cooperation during filming).

 

In fact, take a look at the bottom left of this poster for the film, with its "Actually Filmed in the Canadian Rockies" description. And in what provinces are the Canadian Rockies to be found? British Columbia and Alberta.

 

Poster_of_the_movie_Saskatchewan.jpg

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