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I Just Watched...

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Bedazzled '67- Sadly, it doesn't seem to be out of print everywhere on DVD, and I think it never even got a DVD release in the US. 

 

This was one of my favorite movies through the years and I wore out my videotape. TCM showed it awhile back, so now at least I have a decent DVD recording. I've since seen it at our used DVD store ($5.99) as a "double feature" set coupled with the unwatchable 2000 version.

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Along the Carol Channing lines they did a funny ANNIE one:

 

I'm 30 years old TOMORROW!

And I haven't worked since I played Annie

When I was 10!

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Along the Carol Channing lines they did a funny ANNIE one:

 

I'm 30 years old TOMORROW!

And I haven't worked since I played Annie

When I was 10!

Ha!

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Wow! I'm fairly surprised someone else knows what Forbidden Broadway is. It's one of my all-time favorite things. I know exactly the song you're talking about :)

I find a general rule of thumb for this message board is, if there is some movie, song, show, or actor who you think is just so esoteric that you're about the only person in the world who knows them, there's about 3 to 5 other people here who know twice as much about it as you do.

 

It's why I love it so.

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I just watched "Wizard of Lies" about Bernie Madoff, starring Robert DeNiro  in the title role and Michele Pfeiffer as his wife. This film takes the approach of assuming that the wife and sons knew nothing until Bernie told them right before he was arrested. If there is anything the Bernie Madoff story would teach you, it is "Don't steal from the very rich". The movie emphasized all of the little people who lost everything to the Ponzi scheme, but there were enough people with enough money left over that they could hire attorneys and even claw back money from people who withdrew all of their money before Bernie went bust, even though they knew nothing of the scheme. Compare that to what happened to the banksters who swindled the entire nation - which was absolutely nothing, or Enron, where the law had to practically be shamed into prosecuting the executives who swindled investors.

 

Anyways, back to "The Wizard". Good acting by DeNiro, but Michelle Pfeiffer came across even better IMHO. At one point, while Bernie is under house arrest, she and Bernie decide to commit suicide in "a nice way" using Ambien and a bunch of other pharmaceuticals they have around the house.  It doesn't work - they wake up the next morning. But as they lay in bed expecting to die, who pops up on the TV screen they are watching but Robert Osborne and TCM with him introducing Judy Garland singing "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas". What an odd touch. I didn't even think anybody at HBO knew TCM existed.

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There is a sadness about a performer associated with only a sole character or performance. We all can think of examples where for survival it's resuscitated. Kind of Baby Jane-ish.

 

There's an Irene Cara parody:

 

SAME!

I'll sing this damn song forever. ...

SAME!

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The Woman Who Came Back (1945).

 

Let me take a wild guess. You never heard of this film. I know I hadn't.

 

A Val Lewtonish "B", set in Eben Rock, Massachusetts, which begins with a prologue about the hysteria that had overcome that community regarding witchcraft in the 17th Century. In particular, reference is made to the burning at the stake of Jezebel Trister (and her dog). Jezebel swore to return for her vengeance on the judge who had condemned her.

 

We then fast forward in time to the opening sequence in the film on a bus, with Nancy Kelly returning to that community for the first time in two years. The bus is stopped by a shadowy figure covered by a veil standing in the middle of the road, accompanied by a german shepherd. It's a cackling old crone who wishes a ride to Eben Rock (forced to let her dog run alongside the bus).

 

She sits besides Kelly, introduces herself as Jezebel Twister (the name sounds familiar to Kelly but she still can't quite place it). But Twister knows who she is, and knows she's a descendant of the judge who burned (the other?) Twister 300 years before at the stake. She removes her veil to give a wide smiled cackle scaring Kelly, as the bus veers off the road and plunges into a lake. All aboard will be lost, except for Kelly. The old woman's body is the only one not found.

 

10098-screen2bshot2b2016-10-142bat2b8-44

 

This good opening sequence promises more than the rest of this economy production will, unfortunately, deliver. Kelly becomes convinced that she has taken on the spirit of Trister in a town full of gossips more than ready to believe the same of her. Her fiance, the town doctor, played by John Loder, tries in vain to convince her otherwise. Is Kelly right or is she hysterical?

 

This little "B" may be liked by fans of the Val Lewton horrors, films which clearly inspired this production. At times this strikingly photographed production is able to conjure an ominous mood, which will satisfy for an individual scene.

 

Take the scene in which Kelly sits lone in her house, the only light coming from a nearby fireplace as a thunderstorm booms and lightning strikes outside. Sure, it's a cliche but the mood still works to a degree. She's reading a book (appropriately called The Origins of Superstition) and when she leaves her chair for a few seconds to shut a slamming window, the book is missing when she returns, somehow now across the room burning in the fireplace.

 

nightread.jpg

 

In another scene a young woman is walking home along the street at dusk. All is silent except for the sound of a tiny bell occasionally sounding behind her. She turns to look but sees nothing but darkness., She begins to run in terror. This is a scene that could have been right out of The Leopard Man and while it's not nearly as effective, film buffs can clearly see (and appreciate) the scene's inspiration.

 

The film's ending is a disappointing cop out which tries to explain everything away. The film's script is, indeed, a considerable let down. But The Woman Who Came Back to still worth a look for an ominous mood created in a couple of scenes through strong black and white photography and, of course, for that good opening sequence on the bus.

 

For a little film known by so few film buffs that, at least, is something.

 

There is a quite lovely transfer of this film available on VeeHD.com.

 

vlcsnap-2017-05-21-07h54m54s892_zps9y2fs

 

Remember Elspeth Dudgeon from The Old Dark House? She's back as the old crone on the bus.

 

vlcsnap-2017-05-21-08h04m38s178_zpsiaj1y

 

vlcsnap-2017-05-21-08h05m34s399_zps5proi

 

2 out of 4.

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The Woman Who Came Back (1945).

 

Let me take a wild guess. You never heard of this film. I know I hadn't.

 

Me neither. That's why I love this thread. Thanks for the review, Tom. I will be looking for this one.

 

I discovered the original title was to be The Web.

 

Also, IMDb, which lists Jeanne Gail as "Peggy," appears to be in error regarding her birthdate. Gail was born Jeanne Gerdes on October 23, 1936, in Fresno, some ten years after the date given in IMDb. Did she look about 8 or 9 in this movie, or did she look to be in her early 20s? Here is her photo:

 

gale_zpsgjk6phfv.png

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Me neither. That's why I love this thread. Thanks for the review, Tom. I will be looking for this one.

 

I discovered the original title was to be The Web.

 

Also, IMDb, which lists Jeanne Gail as "Peggy," appears to be in error regarding her birthdate. Gail was born Jeanne Gerdes on October 23, 1936, in Fresno, some ten years after the date given in IMDb. Did she look about 8 or 9 in this movie, or did she look to be in her early 20s? Here is her photo:

 

gale_zpsgjk6phfv.png

 

Thanks Rich.

 

Jeanne Gail appears as a little girl in The Woman Who Came Back. She appears during that thunder and lightning sequence to which I made reference in Nancy Kelly's home. The little girl seeks refuge from the storm there but becomes frightened of Kelly, seen from the little girl's viewpoint, to look bizarre and over eager to have her stay there.

 

I didn't mention it in my review but character actor Otto Krueger is also a part of the community as a minister who tries to discourage people from gossiping. You know that Kreuger is a solid down-to-earth common sense type in a film like this because he smokes a pipe.

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Thanks Rich.

 

Jeanne Gail appears as a little girl in The Woman Who Came Back. She appears during that thunder and lightning sequence to which I made reference in Nancy Kelly's home. The little girl seeks refuge from the storm there but becomes frightened of Kelly, seen from the little girl's viewpoint, to look bizarre and over eager to have her stay there.

 

I didn't mention it in my review but character actor Otto Krueger is also a part of the community as a minister who tries to discourage people from gossiping. You know that Kreuger is a solid down-to-earth common sense type in a film like this because he smokes a pipe.

 

That when one is an obscure, forgotten actress when you can't  find a single photo.  Ebay once sold  a lobby card but is too small to see her clearly (thumbnail only).

 

s-l225.jpg

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That when one is an obscure, forgotten actress when you can't  find a single photo.  Ebay once sold  a lobby card but is too small to see her clearly (thumbnail only).

 

s-l225.jpg

 

There' very little information about Jeanne Gail on IMDB but he says she was later an unbilled chorus girl in Singin' in the Rain. I wonder if she's in the background of this shot.

 

44e4f1f92dee4dfee74f6bbf0006d54c.png

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They need to start selling more SPECIAL EDITION DVDs so they can hire some weekend moderation experts......

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...and BLAM! just like that, it's gone.

 

Thank you, oh Mighty Fighters of the SPAM- whoever ye may be (Moderators? IT guys?) whatever- your Throne awaits in Valhalla.

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They need to start selling more SPECIAL EDITION DVDs so they can hire some weekend moderation experts......

 

 

all kidding aside, and i know i've said this before and it may come off as butt-kissey, but those of you who know me, know I'm the last person to air false praise (or any kind of praise, really)-

 

the moderation staff here has just been excellent since the board redesign 2-3 years ago.

 

I really have no complaints about anything they do...i mean, someone probably just went to use the can for a minute or something and the SPAMATTACK happened....people gots to live.

 

eta: (again, really and truly: THANK YOU.)

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RETURNING THIS THREAD BACK TO THE SUBJECT OF MOVIES, NOT SPAM (WHICH CAN BE DISCUSSED ON A THREAD OF ITS OWN)

 

As a followup, here's a photograph of little Jeanne Gail as she appeared in The Woman Who Came Back.

 

vlcsnap-2017-05-21-12h33m45s579_zps3qg1k

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There' very little information about Jeanne Gail on IMDB but he says she was later an unbilled chorus girl in Singin' in the Rain. I wonder if she's in the background of this shot.

 

 

Jeanne Gail (whose name was sometimes spelled “Gale”) was born in Fresno on October 23, 1936, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Gerdes. She was taken to Hollywood when she was 5, to train for a musical career. She was signed by Bing Crosby’s agency, and appeared in two biblical movies for Cathedral Films when she was 6. She played the piano, and performed on radio station KFAC in Hollywood. In 1945, she auditioned for a part in an Errol Flynn film.* (Apparently, she didn’t get it.)

 

Since her birthday is screwed up on IMDb, my guess is someone confused her with Jeanne Gale, who was an acrobat in the late 1930s.

 

*The Fresno Bee July 13, 1945

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Jeanne Gail (whose name was sometimes spelled “Gale”) was born in Fresno on October 23, 1936, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Gerdes. She was taken to Hollywood when she was 5, to train for a musical career. She was signed by Bing Crosby’s agency, and appeared in two biblical movies for Cathedral Films when she was 6. She played the piano, and performed on radio station KFAC in Hollywood. In 1945, she auditioned for a part in an Errol Flynn film.* (Apparently, she didn’t get it.)

 

Since her birthday is screwed up on IMDb, my guess is someone confused her with Jeanne Gale, who was an acrobat in the late 1930s.

 

*The Fresno Bee July 13, 1945

 

Thanks for the research, Rich, on this little known actress. I don't see any death date listed for Jeanne Gail. Hopefully that means she's still with us.

 

As for that 1945 Flynn film I'm guessing that it was for Never Say Goodbye. There was a part for his daughter in the film (eventually played by Patti Brady) and I know this romantic comedy was filmed in 1945, to be released the following year.

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After many years I watched The Phantom President (1932) again.  It's a Paramount picture with George M. Cohan in the lead.  He plays two parts.  A dour lifeless candidate for President and his more flamboyant doppleganger.  Cohan has a small dance number that is very much in the style that Cagney replicated in Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942).  There are a few smart political songs and some of the dialogue is even spoken in rhyme.  Claudette Colbert is radiant as Cohan's love interest.  Where it may fall down is that we are to believe that a medicine show con artist could actually convince the American public that he is good candidate for President. :lol: He even sings that his stain remover would be good to rid the country of the sitting president's many policies.  He eventually does the right thing and comes clean that he is a fraud.  I can't see that happening in real life!   I firmly believe that this film is the uncredited source of Ivan Reitman's Dave (1993).  I had mentioned that a while ago in another thread.

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After many years I watched The Phantom President (1932) again. It's a Paramount picture with George M. Cohan in the lead. He plays two parts. A dour lifeless candidate for President and his more flamboyant doppleganger. Cohan has a small dance number that is very much in the style that Cagney replicated in Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942). There are a few smart political songs and some of the dialogue is even spoken in rhyme. Claudette Colbert is radiant as Cohan's love interest. Where it may fall down is that we are to believe that a medicine show con artist could actually convince the American public that he is good candidate for President. :lol: He even sings that his stain remover would be good to rid the country of the sitting president's many policies. He eventually does the right thing and comes clean that he is a fraud. I can't see that happening in real life! I firmly believe that this film is the uncredited source of Ivan Reitman's Dave (1993). I had mentioned that a while ago in another thread.

INTRIGUING!!!

Where'd you find this?!

 

Ps- why does everyone always forget MOON OVER PARADOR? is it because it sucks?

 

(think I just answered my own question.)

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Violated (1953) youtube

 

Low-budget flick, filmed in NYC, about a photographer who kills women and cuts off locks of their hair. Producer William Holland plays the photographer, and screenwriter William Mishkin (I know, these are real household names) has a bit. An exotic dancer named Lili Dawn plays one of the victims. She’s not bad looking if you can imagine Hedy Lamarr with about twenty more pounds on her. The musical score consists of a guitar played by Tony Mottola. 

 

Except for the 1950s view of the city, this film doesn’t have much to offer. The acting is pretty bad, and the dialogue is worse.  As the film’s shrink explains, “the human mind is a vast domain. When its door is unhinged it’s open to an endless variety of q u e e r happenings.” Like this movie.

 

Untitled_zpsnjwfzfia.png

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Last night I watched the 3rd of my biography movies: JANIS JOPLIN LITTLE GIRL BLUE first broadcast on PBS American Masters series. Not knowing ANYTHING about Janis except for she was born in Texas and died young from an OD, this film was perfect for me. 

Amy J Berg was the filmmaker, and she told Janis' story through film clips, photos and reading from her own letters to her parents back in Texas.

The interviews were with her siblings, band members, colleagues, friends-all people who actually knew her. They helped flesh out her personality by recounting incidents and her reactions.

 

Thankfully, most of the self indulgent parts of the interviews are DVD "extras", like contemporary musicians explaining how Janis has influenced their careers, and the remaining members of Big Brother Holding Co singing together.

 

It painted a very full & colorful picture of the type of person Janis was. Really, does ANYONE write letters to their parents (or any loved ones) anymore? I could just feel how young and impressionable Janis was when she broke into the music scene. I had no idea she sang in three bands and had several difficult career decisions. I'm glad her drug use was discussed matter-of-fact-ly and not sensationalized. She seems like another one who successfully kicked the habit, then ODed from a relapse.

 

It was also amazing to me that her talent was completely natural, how it all came from within herself, without instruction or training. Many spoke about how she "touched" them spiritually with her performances.

 

Incredibly, just watching this documentary, I was touched spiritually too. I now understand what was so special & unique about Joplin as a singer, performer and person. (plus she had fantastic taste in clothing!)

 

Great job on this documentary.

 

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I practically grew up listening to blues(long story) and when Janis hit the scene, she just KNOCKED ME OUT!  I never thought much of the BAND behind her, but once she got going, you never bothered to notice them.

 

Such power coming from such a diminutive package( She wasn't very physically commanding) was an amazing experience.  I saw her live at Detroit's Grande ballroom, and was only a few lines of people back from the stage.  And that there was still HAIR on my head after she did "Try"  STILL surprises me.  Almost as much as it taking 47 years after her death for you to finally understand what WAS so special about her.

 

 

Sepiatone

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After many years I watched The Phantom President (1932) again.  It's a Paramount picture with George M. Cohan in the lead.  He plays two parts.  A dour lifeless candidate for President and his more flamboyant doppleganger.  Cohan has a small dance number that is very much in the style that Cagney replicated in Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942).

 

This was Cohan's only film appearance. I have to wonder if Warner Brothers acquired a print of it in order for Cagney to study his dancing style. I have never read that Cohan and Cagney actually met one another, though I believe that George M. gave Yankee Doodle Dandy a positive nod of approval shortly before he died. I can understand why. Quite frankly, Cagney in the role is a lot more likable than the real Cohan (based on an ancient memory I have after seeing Phantom President many years ago).

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Hot Skin And Cold Cash (1965) - Times Square Hooker Neo Noir

 

"FILM NOIR HAD AN INEVITABLE TRAJECTORY…

THE ECCENTRIC & OFTEN GUTSY STYLE OF FILM NOIR HAD NO WHERE ELSE TO GO… BUT TO REACH FOR EVEN MORE OFF-BEAT, DEVIANT– ENDLESSLY RISKY & TABOO ORIENTED SET OF NARRATIVES FOUND IN THE SUBVERSIVE AND EXPLOITATIVE CULT FILMS OF THE MID TO LATE 50s through the 60s and into the early 70s!" The Last Drive In  

 

Screenshot%2B%25288989%2529.png

Shelly ((Victoria Astor)) in Times Square

 

A day in the life of Times Square street walker Shelly (Victoria Astor). It's Hooker Noir. We have our PI's our Femme Fatales, our washed up boxers, our amnesia victims, our falsely accused, our hitch-hikers, our small time losers looking to score one last dream, and now we have a lady of the evening as the subject of our tale. It's a clever realistic angle for a quasi sexploitation flick shot on the gritty streets of Manhattan. This diamond in the rough curiously delivers.  Astor is great, there are none of the usual clichés, she's just a working girl selling her body for $25 a trick where Broadway and 7th intersect. It's also another great time capsule to the tawdry side of Times Square circa 1965.

 

Directed by Barry Mahon who (believe it or not) was a distinguished fighter pilot during WWII. He was shot down and imprisoned in Stalag Luft III where Mahon worked on the same escape tunnels made famous by the movie The Great Escape (1963). It has been said that the part of Steve McQueen in that film was partially based upon Mahon. He's mainly known for producing a number of Errol Flynn and Gina Lollobrigida pictures Crossed Swords (1954), Cuban Rebel Girls (1959), as well as a considerable amount of children's programs and for the most part quickie, mostly bad sexploitation features. 

 

As Mahon is quoted (explaining his style of low-budget filmmaking), "We have not aimed for the single picture that is going to make us rich. We are looking for the business that's like turning out Ford cars or anything else. If there is a certain profit per picture and we make so many pictures, then we have established a business that is on a basis that's economical." Luckily for us a few of these  justmay hit on all cylinders.

 

There are curiously no writing credits on the film proper, though a script girl is listed. The film consists of a series of realistic encounters that a hooker might have on her typical day. It's possible that it's just a rough sketch gleamed from interviews with actual prostitutes, who knows. The cinematography is by Joseph Mangine (The Lords of Flatbush (1974), The Sword and the Sorcerer (1982)) and the effectively cheap sleazy jazz score is by Al Klap.

 

The film stars Victoria Astor (Some Like It Violent (1968)) as Shelly, Charles Howard, John Connant as the lawyer Mr. Stone, Phil Fitzpatrick as the College boy, Michael Garlock as the Weirdo, Allen Joseph (Naked City TV Series (1958–1963), The Fugitive TV Series (1963–1967), Eraserhead (1977), Raging Bull (1980)) as the Priest, Scott Lehman as the Police lieutenant and Dixie Van Cortlandt (as possibly the rival prostitute).

 

Again, what makes some of these these low budget films worthwhile, to quote V. Vale & Andrea Juno in Incredibly Strange Films, is the "unfettered creativity. Often the films are eccentric-even extreme-presentations by individuals freely expressing their imaginations..." To quote Picasso "Ah, good taste! What a dreadful thing! Taste is the enemy of creativeness."

 

Fuller review in Film Noir/Gangster thread.

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