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I forgot about Fonda in The Morning After. Good film....she has a line I'll always remember. A failed actress, she says "The studio was grooming me to be the next Vera Miles.....How can you be the next someone who never was?"

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I forgot about Fonda in The Morning After. Good film....she has a line I'll always remember. A failed actress, she says "The studio was grooming me to be the next Vera Miles.....How can you be the next someone who never was?"

Dayum.

Vera needed some cocoa butter for that burn....

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A very good portrayal of a female drunk is Ann Dvorak in THE WALLS OF JERICHO. She plays Cornel Wilde's socially inept drunken wife. Wilde, a rising politician is embarrassed by his wife's behavior around guests when drunk, her inferiority complex having her lashing out. Wilde realizes she is a liability for his ambitions.

 

Ann also plays a convincing drunk, as well as similar character,  in A Life of Her Own,  the Lana Turner \ Ray Milland film.   

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Laurie holds the film together with her performance as an alcoholic who's seemingly strong, but is lost in dreams of her lover, and her past glories, real and imagined. She makes a flesh and blood character out a cardboard role.

She lost her youth and she lost her Tony, now she's lost her mind?

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My favorite part:

 

"Do you pop out at parties?"

 

Followed by "are you unpoopular?"

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Followed by "are you unpoopular?"

Followed by: "Well are YOU?"

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"White Sun  /Seto Surya"  ( 2016 )  

 

Nepalese film about the Nepal cival war.  Really good movie, caught this film at a recent film festival.

 

 

 

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Re: FAT CITY- Hopefully someday TCM will find it in their heart to show this classic.

 

They just showed it a few months ago....I know because I recorded it. Tried watching it, but just couldn't. The disk is in another pile to try watching again later. Maybe it's a "mood" movie.

 

"Ruby" (1977)--Starring Piper Laurie, Stuart Whitman, and Roger Davis.  Directed by Curtis Harrington.

 

I think I have the movie poster for that. Looked to me like a 60's juvie type film from the images. Poster notes hit song "Ruby De Doo", is it the same movie?

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I watched "Wind chill" (2007) starring Ashton Holmes and Emily Blunt.

 

Most ghost story type movies are a big yawn and not worth wasting time on IMO,but Wind Chill is THE BEST ghost/haunted road movie i can remember ever seeing.

 

It's actually scary,even the 10th time around.Good movie. :)

 

wind_chill.jpg

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I watched "Wind chill" (2007) starring Ashton Holmes and Emily Blunt.

 

Most ghost story type movies are a big yawn and not worth wasting time on IMO,but Wind Chill is THE BEST ghost/haunted road movie i can remember ever seeing.

 

It's actually scary,even the 10th time around.Good movie. :)

 

wind_chill.jpg

 

For many what's scary is having one's car in that situation. ;)

 

wind-chill-3-1.jpeg

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Kee-ripes!

 

that enormous vintage Oldsmobile is terrifying in and of itself. I may not sleep tonight just thinking of the kind of gas mileage it must get!!!

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TikiSoo--Re "Ruby" (1977)--It's a horror film set in the early 50's and a prologue in the 1930's.  That song is not in the film, at least not in the print I saw.

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"High, Wide, and Handsome" (1937)--Starring Irene Dunne, Randolph Scott, Dorothy Lamour,  and Elizabeth Patterson.  Directed by Rouben Mamoulian.

 

This operetta with music by Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II (Hammerstein also wrote the lyrics, story, and screenplay) is about the discovery of oil in western Pennsylvania in 1859.

 

Movie starts out with Sally (Dunne) belting out the title song in a medicine show, trying to sell some quack "medicine" her father has bottled.  A curtain is left on top of a boiling kettle, and their wagon/house burns down.  She takes shelter from Grandma (Patterson) and Peter (Scott).  Peter, who has built a derrick on his property, has an idea he can get rich from Pennsylvania oil.  The rest of the film is about the courtship, marriage, and difficulties of Sally and Peter.

 

Dunne gets the lion's share of the solos, and is in crystal clear voice.  She makes the songs sound better than they are, and is the film's main asset.  Scott doesn't sing, and is thereby saddled with all the baggage of the plot.  Lamour gets only two songs, and more than does justice to them.

 

Film produced two semi-standards, "The Folks Who Live On The Hill" and "Can I Forget You?".

 

Part operetta, part action film, part historical drama, it's obvious that everyone involved has done their utmost to make a classic.  The film misses the mark due to a slow second half with too much talk.  This overlooked film is more than worth a watch.  2.9/4.

 

Source--archive.org.  Archived as "Alegre E Feliz 1937 Leg".  Has Portuguese subtitles.

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I watched Purple Noon, the French adaptation (by Rene Clement) of Patricia Highsmith's novel, The Talented Mr. Ripley. I liked it very much, though it was a bit confusing to see a movie, in French, with French actors playing Americans in Italy. Nevertheless a fine film, with an excellent Alain Delon as the eponymous con artist/murderer.

 

dapper-devil-alain-delon-purple-noon-196

 

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I watched Purple Noon, the French adaptation (by Rene Clement) of Patricia Highsmith's novel, The Talented Mr. Ripley. I liked it very much, though it was a bit confusing to see a movie, in French, with French actors playing Americans in Italy. Nevertheless a fine film, with an excellent Alain Delon as the eponymous con artist/murderer.

 

Strangely enough, I just watched a movie based on a Patricia Highsmith story, The Two Faces of January. It was good, although not terribly memorable. 

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Dangerous Crossing.  I borrowed this from the library.  I'm making it a goal to try and watch all of the movies in the Fox Film Noir series.

 

So far I've seen: Black Widow; The Dark Corner, Fallen Angel, I Wake Up Screaming, Kiss of Death, Laura, Nightmare Alley, Pickup on South Street, Where the Sidewalk Ends and Whirlpool.  

 

I have these checked out from the library: Boomerang, House of Bamboo and No Way Out

 

Anyway, last night I watched Dangerous Crossing with Jeanne Crain.

 

I think Crain is a very underrated actress.  She appeared in a lot of really great movies: Leave Her to Heaven and A Letter to Three Wives but she wasn't the sole "name" above the title.  Even in films where she is the star (Apartment For Peggy and Dangerous Crossing) she proves she is more than capable of carrying a film.  Crain is a star and worked steadily in good pictures, but it seems she was never able to achieve that next level of stardom.  Outside of the classic movie world, Jeanne Crain isn't really a household name.  

 

Dangerous Crossing is no Laura, but it was interesting and held my attention from beginning to end.  Crain portrays newlywed Ruth Bowman nee Stanton, who is boarding a cruise ship to Europe with her new husband, John (Carl Betz, aka Mr. Stone in The Donna Reed Show).  Shortly after boarding and checking into their cabin (B16), John leaves Ruth telling her he has to check on something.  After much time passes and John hasn't returned, Ruth goes around the ship looking for her husband.  She asks the crew members (who at the beginning of the film had seen Ruth and John together) if they know his whereabouts and all tell Ruth that they never saw her with any man and they don't know what she's talking about.  Everyone on the boat has the same story.  Ruth then discovers that the room she checked into (B16) is not in fact her cabin and she is registered to cabin B18 under her maiden name, Ruth Stanton.  Further undermining her claim to be married is the captain noticing that she isn't wearing a wedding ring.  The crew begins to believe she is mentally unstable and she ends up assigned to the care of the ship's captain, Dr. Manning (Michael Rennie).  

 

Throughout the film, Ruth tries to figure out what happened to her husband while maintaining the facade that she acted foolish earlier and that perhaps she wasn't really married.  Of course, she knows she was.  Mysterious events keep happening which leads Ruth to believe that the crew members are not what they seem.  A couple quick phone calls from an unknown location informs Ruth that John still exists, somewhere.  

 

The ending of the film came together nicely, even if it wasn't entirely surprising.  It is apparent from the beginning of the film that there is something hinky going on. 

 

Crain's performance as the confused and scared wife was excellent as were the supporting players.  Max Showalter, aka Casey Adams, plays the ship's purser and for once in this film, he's not irritating.  He isn't in the film very much and in his scenes, he's whatever.  Co-star Michael Rennie was a bit bland, but he was serviceable in his role as the doctor and seemingly the only person who maybe believes that there is something to Ruth's story.

 

While this wasn't the best noir I'd ever seen, it was entertaining enough to watch from beginning to end. 

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"Robocop" (2014)

 

Couldn't they made a smooth running cyborg?  That noisy racket he makes when moving can drive a person a bit nutty.  Maybe a little WD 40 can help. 

 

Robocop, you KNOW he's coming!

Robocop_2014_poster.jpg

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For many what's scary is having one's car in that situation. ;)


 


wind-chill-3-1.jpeg


 


Or for others, a typical annoyance. Lots of people around here prefer giant autos just for the added weight in those road conditions. I'll check that movie out.


 


Thanks 293 for the RUBY answer....I was mistaken.

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if i remember correctly, the FOX FILM NOIR SERIES DVDs have A LOT of terrific extras, including making of featurettes- i know the one for DAISY KENYON has a marvelous interview with Robert Osborne REALLY worth watching because I think they got him drunk or something- he's really animated and very different from how he always was on TCM.

 

Highly recommended if for no other reason than that and that alone. (although i like the movie; it might even be Dana Andrew's best performance.)

 

ps- BOOMERANG was a real disappointment. My thread when it aired last Oscar month is somewhere in the catacombs here.

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Rikers (2016)
I wasn't surprised, yet I was horrified.
 

 

This PBS documentary, part of the Independent Lens series,  is about life at Rikers Island, which acts as the local jail for New York City. It consisted of conversations with several former inmates of Rikers Island as they recounted the time they spent there - often years - awaiting trial because they did not have bail money.

The things they had to say about other inmates I did not find too surprising - show no weakness, attempts at friendship are probably just attempts to ferret out weakness, show any weakness and other inmates will steal all of your stuff including your food, don't be a deep sleeper and if you don't have a home-made weapon at your ready you are in trouble, always stand up for yourself. One inmate said he joined a prison gang just to survive on the inside.

The institution itself was a bit of an education, at least for middle class me. The inmates said the guards were no better than the inmates. They would loose two prisoners who hated each other and take bets on who won the inevitable fight. Guards would let fights in progress finish before they intervened, again betting on the outcome, and if you tried to get a guard in trouble they would put you in solitary. There you are in dim drab surroundings, you get no visits, and you don't get enough food to sustain yourself so you have to save food so when you are really hungry you have something to eat. Apparently these people are not just whining because several multi million dollar settlements have been paid out by NYC on behalf of the treatment of prisoners at Rikers, and all have agreed that Rikers should be divided into five smaller jails dispersed throughout the city.

One interesting thing - the inmates who were interviewed were eloquent and insightful, about themselves and the institution, but they all "fit the narrative" you might say of people you would expect to get in trouble with the law. They came from broken homes or drug addicted parents, they came from poverty, had little education, and one girl spent three years there because she could not make bail only in the end to be acquitted of all charges. I would say, all fit the narrative but one - There was one woman who was raised middle class, was white, had a bachelor's degree, had a husband and three children, and had a good job with a law firm only to one day decide to help herself to 300,000 dollars from a trust fund. I was interested in her story so I googled her just to see what happened.

In 2009 she was working at ANOTHER law firm, this time in Pennsylvania, and AGAIN stole money - this time 100K - partially to pay restitution to the law firm in New York City! Maybe "ban the box" is not such a good idea after all! At any rate, this is a very good documentary that largely lets the inmates - and some hidden cameras - speak for themselves. Just don't be expecting an uplifting experience.

 

9/10

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I saw "Rikers" too when it was on recently, calvinnme.  It was pretty stark, but having seen news stories about the place and reading about it in the past, I was actually surprised that it looked a bit better than I expected.  Still, the conditions inside as related to the inmates and their relationship with jail staff was pretty depressing and at times, gruesome.  And to think, Rikers Island is just a holding facility for people who are awaiting trial or a resolution to their court cases.

 

I was surprised to see one of the ringleaders of "The Latin Kings" gang was now an ordained minister.  He must be Episcopalian, because he was wearing a Catholic priest's collar and he was shown in the interviews sitting next to his wife.  However, the Catholic Church has accepted Episcopal priests into its clergy recently as converts to that particular faith, even if they might be married.

 

I remember the woman who committed the white collar crime in order to secure funds to pay her mortgage.  Her scheme only cost her her marriage, her family, and a good relationship she had with her in-laws.  Way to go, huh?  It was further into the program that it was explained what she did to get put into Rikers.  Prior to that revelation, I was wondering what she could have possibly done to wind up there.  She certainly did not fit the stereotypical type of inmate one would expect to see there.

 

It was particularly sad to see the one guy who was murdered the same day he collected his court settlement from New York City because of the harsh treatment he received from guards and other inmates.

 

For those who survived the place and did time in the New York State Corrections System and went on to counsel people on how to live a more fulfilled life without ever having to go through what they did, I hope they are having great success in getting their message out to those who are seen as 'at risk'.  But then again, people all too often surmise..."It happened to so-and-so, but it won't happen to me.".

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"The Whale That Exploded" (2009)

 

What a mess.

 

Couldn't help to laugh at the remarks of an eye witness stating he thought it was a suicide bomber. :lol:

 

Goodness are people getting that fat?

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"The Amazing Transparent Man" (1960)--Starring Marguerite Chapman.  Directed by Edgar G. Ulmer.

 

First, the man isn't see-through.  He's invisible.  Second, this is a sci-fi movie that's only good for horselaughs, snickers at 1960 slang, and snorts at plot holes a tank would fit through.

 

A man who is an expert safecracker breaks out of prison, and countless rounds of ammunition fired at him all miss.  His girlfriend Laura (Chapman) picks him up, and takes him to a farmhouse where nuclear material is being kept, and nobody wears protective clothing, not even a hat.  A scientist is working with the nuclear material, only because his daughter is being kept prisoner.  You can guess the plot from there.

 

Two good lines: Laura, to safecracker: "Lay off the giggle water!" (vodka).

 

Clueless Laura to a suddenly visible safecracker after a heist: "What's wrong??"

 

That last line got the biggest laugh of the 57 minute movie from me.

 

The brain dead script was officially blamed on Jack Lewis.

 

For bad movie lovers only.  BTW, film was last reviewed on TCM.com in 2008.

 

Source--YouTube.

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"The Amazing Transparent Man" (1960)--Starring Marguerite Chapman.  Directed by Edgar G. Ulmer.

 

Here is Chapman, auditioning for a part in It Happened One Night.

 

untitled4-2.jpg

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