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The Putin Interviews (2017)

 

Actually these interviews were filmed in 2015.

 

Director Oliver Stone travels about with Vladimir Putin and produces four hours of "interview" time. It's not really an interview, as it shows Stone doing some interviewing and also accompanying Putin as he plays a hockey game - something he said he learned just three years before this was filmed (2015) - and as he does some judo - he holds a black belt.

The thing is, Vladimir Putin comes across as an eloquent and thoughtful guy, not like the fat little dictator of North Korea who is well fed versus his starving subjects and always tries to dress "cool" but as a result just looks ridiculous. Every time Stone tries to bring up something unpleasant about either Russia past or present, Putin has an answer. Stone brings up Stalin, what a monster he was, and yet there are still statues to him. Putin brings up Napoleon and how France admits that what he did was a disgrace yet there are still statues to him. He mentions England's Oliver Cromwell and how he became a dictator and that yet there are statues to him in his home country. When questioned about gay rights in Russia, he even has a compassionate liberal answer for that. He is well versed in history and politics past and present of both the West and Russia, and never loses his cool. And remember, this guy was in the KGB from 1975 to 1990.

Stone asks Putin if he has ever seen "Dr. Strangelove". Putin admits he has not. So Putin stops and takes the time to watch the movie with Stone, although from his expression - and it doesn't change much EVER - you can tell he is probably humoring him. In spite of that, at the end, Putin makes some well thought out remarks about the film that could have been forged into a superior review.

The point is - this is not the guy I was expecting. Plus, you can tell he somewhat charmed Oliver Stone. If this is the same Putin that Donald Trump met, who apparently knows how to shift his presentation to his company, Trump could have easily been putty in his hands.

Watch it - all four hours if you have the time - I think it will be a revelation.

 

Source: Showtime

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Don't know why exactly, but for some reason Sans' review of that James Mason flick down below there is remindin' me of that old joke:

 

"Well, other than that Mrs. Lincoln, how'd ya like the play?"

 

Oh, don't say that...The local town theater group put on a rare production of "Our American Cousin" for Lincoln's birthday a few years ago, which I'd been inexplicably curious about since I was a kid, and now that somebody finally was putting it on after all these years, we had company over that weekend and I couldn't go. :(

Never occurred to me to ask, is the text online somewhere?

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Oh, don't say that...The local town theater group put on a rare production of "Our American Cousin" for Lincoln's birthday a few years ago, which I'd been inexplicably curious about since I was a kid, and now that somebody finally was putting it on after all these years, we had company over that weekend and I couldn't go. :(

Never occurred to me to ask, is the text online somewhere?

Yes, on google books.

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"Well, other than that Mrs. Lincoln, how'd ya like the play?"

 

 

Your observation was quite oddly appropriate as I spent much time considering the joys of widowhood.

 

My insignificant duhther remains alive solely due to my recalling one of my favorite lines by Robert A. Heinlein: "Cutting his throat is only a momentary pleasure and is bound to get you talked about.”

 

I will have my revenge for having to watch this movie. It is unfortunate to say that it may require considerable time for me to formulate an appropriate retaliation as I am a sweet, kindly, pure and innocent girl and my charitable mind simply does not have the pathways of malicious cruelty or pathological malevolence necessary to easily concoct a retribution equivalent to an atrocity of this level. It is true however that I love to rise to a challenge.

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Did anyone watch Hour of Glory (1949) (aka The Small Back Room) on TCM late Wednesday evening?

(spoilers ahead!)

I’m not sure I completely understand the dynamic between the main character, Sammy Rice, and his girlfriend Susan.

It was clear that Sammy had a chronic pain issue which he could only address through drugs (‘dope’) or drinking.  The drinking would only temporarily make him not care about the pain, whereas the drugs had serious psychological side-effects, as was so eloquently demonstrated later on in the film.

Susan was well aware of his condition, and at times it seemed like she was encouraging him to take the drugs instead of drinking?  They also had a bottle of some type of alcohol that they were supposed to be saving for  “V-day.”  But Sammy goes on a bender and breaks open the special bottle.  Then at the end of the film Susan replaces the bottle with a new one and for the last line of the film says “Have a drink, Sammy” as Sammy realizes that she has come back to him and repaired all the damage he did to the room while drunk.

I interpreted this ending to mean that this was sort of a Victory Day for them because Sammy had finally stood up to take control of the science research group and they had restored their relationship, but I’m not sure if I really got everything.

There was another scene that I found curious - Susan holds up a newspaper in front of the fireplace, and for a moment you can see all the light from the fire coming through the newspaper.  But the newspaper catches on fire so Susan has to throw the paper into the fireplace.  Not sure what she was trying to do with the paper in the first place?

Powell-Pressburger films are always top class but I was somewhat puzzled at times during this one.

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For any posters in a mood to see the bizarre (and carnival freak shows are no longer legal, I understand), there are prints of this film available on You Tube.

 

 

I had considered providing a source for streaming the movie but it did occur to me that curiosity might lead some innocent person to begin to watch it. I would not want that on my conscience. 

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Down With Love.  Still on the Ewan McGregor train, I borrowed this movie from the library and watched it last night (I may have watched it today too) I loved this movie.  I will probably have to procure my own copy of the film.  My birthday is on Thursday, so perhaps I'll add it to my running list of wanted films and see if someone will buy it for me.  Lol.  

 

When this movie hit theaters in 2003, it barely recouped its production costs.  It turned a very minimal profit.  It was considered a bust when it came out.  However, I do not think that that is indicative of the quality of the film.  The film checks off all the boxes for me when it comes to what I consider a "great" film.  Fun? Check. Rewatchable? Very. Check. Great music, costumes, setting? Check. Hot leading man? Check.  I think that audiences did not know what to make of this film when it came out.  

 

Down With Love is an homage to the 1960s Doris Day and Rock Hudson sex farce comedies.  It even features Tony Randall in a small role! The film takes place in 1962 New York City.  Renee Zellweger plays Barbara Novak, a feminist writer who writes a bestselling book entitled Down With Love.  Novak's book instructs women to give up antiquated notions of love and marriage and to encourage them to enjoy sex without commitment.  She also informs women that they don't need men and that men can be replaced with other things that bring the woman enjoyment and satisfaction.  Of course, this book does not go over well with the men in the world.  Ewan McGregor co-stars as Catcher Block, an award winning writer for Know Magazine who specializes in writing sensational exposés about various public figures.  Block is also a notorious playboy, "a ladies man, man's man, man about town."  Novak's editor and best friend, Vicky is portrayed by Sarah Paulson.  David Hyde Pierce rounds out the cast as Catcher Block's best friend and boss who ends up in a relationship with Vicky.  

 

The main plot of the film involves Block being assigned to write a story about Novak.  He finds this assignment incredibly dull, especially since he disagrees vehemently with Novak's premise of "Down With Love."  He then has a change of heart (kind of) and decides that he is going to write an article exposing Novak as a fraud.  He decides that he will seduce her and get her to fall in love with him--completely denouncing her concept that women can have meaningless sex without being in love with her partner.  He ends up creating the disguise of Zip Martin, a glasses-wearing Astronaut from the South.  He takes her out on a ton of dates to woo her.  He also has to stay out of the sack with her, until she falls in love with him, otherwise he'd destroy his plan.  Catcher's plan is working very well until it is working a little too well--and he finds himself actually falling for Novak.  They share a pretty hot kiss which, at first it's just a kiss to keep Novak interested when it seems that she's trying to end the affair, but then it becomes something more--to the point where Catcher literally has to cool himself off afterward.  The film has an interesting plot twist at the end which I wasn't expecting--but it does follow many of the traditional rom-com troupes.  

 

Renee Zellweger is pretty good in this film, though I feel like she isn't someone who a notorious playboy like Catcher Block would fall for.  The leading man in fact is prettier than the leading lady in this film. Zellweger does lend some charm to the film however, so she works for me. Zellweger does wear some fabulous 1960s era clothing however, which is fun and Ewan McGregor wears a lot of great suits.  In great 1960s tradition, the bachelor playboy character has a fantastic pad.  Catcher Block's apartment features a multitude of controls geared toward seducing his female companion within ten minutes of entering the apartment.  Barbara Novak's apartment is more goofy and typical of some of the wackier 1960s decor, whereas Block's is more modern and sleek--just like the man himself.  

 

I believe that had this film debuted a few years later, like during Mad Men which revitalized the interest in mid-century modern, perhaps this film would have found more of an audience.  The film is very stylized as it is supposed to represent the 1960s Technicolor films.  I can also see some audiences not understanding the film and just thinking it's weird.  I love this film, found it fun and entertaining.  Plus, it offered some great eye candy, which after a long day at work, sometimes that's all you want/need in the evening. 

 

There's also a great sequence during the credits featuring Zellweger and McGregor singing a swinging 1960s-esque song, called "Here's to Love."  Zellweger is a great singer, but it is McGregor who really steals the whole song.  This man should record an album. 

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Did anyone watch Hour of Glory (1949) (aka The Small Back Room) on TCM late Wednesday evening?

 

(spoilers ahead!)

 

I’m not sure I completely understand the dynamic between the main character, Sammy Rice, and his girlfriend Susan.

 

It was clear that Sammy had a chronic pain issue which he could only address through drugs (‘dope’) or drinking.  The drinking would only temporarily make him not care about the pain, whereas the drugs had serious psychological side-effects, as was so eloquently demonstrated later on in the film.

 

Susan was well aware of his condition, and at times it seemed like she was encouraging him to take the drugs instead of drinking?  They also had a bottle of some type of alcohol that they were supposed to be saving for  “V-day.”  But Sammy goes on a bender and breaks open the special bottle.  Then at the end of the film Susan replaces the bottle with a new one and for the last line of the film says “Have a drink, Sammy” as Sammy realizes that she has come back to him and repaired all the damage he did to the room while drunk.

 

I interpreted this ending to mean that this was sort of a Victory Day for them because Sammy had finally stood up to take control of the science research group and they had restored their relationship, but I’m not sure if I really got everything.

 

There was another scene that I found curious - Susan holds up a newspaper in front of the fireplace, and for a moment you can see all the light from the fire coming through the newspaper.  But the newspaper catches on fire so Susan has to throw the paper into the fireplace.  Not sure what she was trying to do with the paper in the first place?

 

Powell-Pressburger films are always top class but I was somewhat puzzled at times during this one.

 

First and primarily, I found the film's pace to be extremely slow, cmovieviewer.

 

Secondly, yes, I too was a bit puzzled as to the final message the film seemed to imply or convey. Was Susan giving Sammy her approval for his continued drinking and only because as she had hoped he would finally stand up for himself within his business environment? I don't know.

 

And re the newspaper thing, I had the impression that she was attempting to dry it out as maybe it had become damp or water soaked during its delivery to his flat.

 

(...I mean you know how that weather tends to be over there on that Island of The Superfluous-U, doncha?!)

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I had considered providing a source for streaming the movie but it did occur to me that curiosity might lead some innocent person to begin to watch it. I would not want that on my conscience. 

 

I understand, that, SansFin, but I wanted to assist any masochists that may be reading the thread.

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I watched WANCHO NATAWIOUS (1952) wast night on TCM ON DEMAND

 

I had seen it once before and liked it then, but I was surprised at how much I had forgotten about it. It's an interesting movie who's beginning pulls absolutely no punches – they're very forthright about the fact that a young woman is brutally raped and murdered by someone in the first 15 minutes.

 

It was directed by Fritz Lang, and it's one of those rare efforts of his where I have to say he could've stepped it up a bit. The direction is not quite on par with the screenplay, which really is excellent. Basically the premise is: a guy goes around searching for the man who killed and raped his fiancée and ends up at a ranch run by MARLENE DIETRICH where she is shielding outlaws and he has to guess which of the eight men she is protecting has done it.

 

since Lang shows the rapist and murderer's face in the very beginning- there's no suspense whatsoever about this. Can't help but feel like Lang could've used some of his directorly tricks to hide the identity of the rapist/murder and thus amp up the suspense and mystery a bit more.

 

Arthur Kennedy plays the lead, I'm not a fan and he's too old for the role. Mel Ferrer plays the other male lead, and I actually liked him in this although I've never been interested in him as an actor before. The rest of the cast is a Who's Who of character actors a lot of western fans will recognize- including Jack Elam at his most Elamesque.

 

Marwene is sumptuous as awways tho- she pawades abowat in a sewies of fabuwous wigs and wadwobe.

 

I wonder if she waxed huh wear faw diss...

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Huh wear, huh wear....am I not being cweer here?

 

Why Lorna. Need you ask? You're ALWAYS "cweer" around here, aren't ya ol' buddy?!

 

;)

 

(...sorry, couldn't resist...especially after that "you straight guys and your fascination with women's breasts" comment to me yesterday over in that Liberace thread)

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I taped Operator 13 because I want to be more familiar with Marion Davies's work.  I don't care whose mistress she was; this proves she was one fine actress.  The role called for her to sing and dance, pretend to be bi-racial and play heavily dramatic scenes which she all did excellently.  The ending was a tacked-on "happily ever after" bit but the rest of it was great.

 

First off:  Pauline Cushman was an actual Union spy who was portrayed fairly accurately.  Another spy, Emma Edwards, did successfully darken her skin, work behind Southern lines as a slave, and pass on information to the North.  Both survived the war and were hailed as national heroines.  This lends credibility to a plot that might otherwise seem farfetched.   

 

If you like The Mills Brothers here's your chance to hear them do more than Cab Driver.  They perform all through the film and are not the usual stereotypical stupid, ignorant Black characters.  The songs fit the movie's time frame and they do their part in a daring rescue.  In fact most of the Black characters are not the "stepin fechet" types, only a "Mammy" type woman and she's on screen only briefly. 

 

The story also shows what the life of a spy is really like and the toll it takes on them when required to "sell out" people they would otherwise want to be friends with.  Jean Parker is riveting as Eleanor, the Southern bride whose life is destroyed when Gail does her job; the scene when both women must confront the consequences of what has happened is heartbreaking (Eleanor doesn't know what Gail has done and turns to her for comfort; Gail knows she's responsible and shares her pain even when as she knows she's done the right thing). 

 

If there's any problem it's the question of if Gail's Southern lover (Gary Cooper) who's seen Gail as both slave and aristocrat can't tell the difference (he says "Anne" reminds him of someone but can't figure out who).   With the divide between the races and social standing being as great as it was then I'm guessing psychologically it was possible not to know.

 

Perhaps the contrived ending was done to satisfy both areas of the country who still had veterans of the war in their mists.  It might have been better had it been more realistic.  Otherwise I'm glad I discovered this little gem.  This is what TCM does for us; where else could I have stumbled across it?  Thanks, folks!            

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Back again.  Two great ones in a day!

 

Guess who didn’t know Disney made a live-action version of Cinderella a few years ago?  It popped up on an Encore station yesterday and I found I enjoyed it a lot.  I don’t know if feminists would like it but it’s much better than the animated one we grew up with. (I’ve not seen the version Drew Barrymore did yet but want to as I understand that was a real self-actualized one). 

 

The characters are developed here.  We see Ella as a child with loving parents who instill courage, compassion and optimism in her.    When her father remarries after her mother’s death then dies himself- leaving the family broke-again we see the reasons for the stepmother’s anger and hostility towards Ella.  To her credit the girl defends herself when possible and refuses to let the woman and her vapid daughters-something even the mother admits to-destroy her peace.  The relationship between the prince and dying king is very touching as is between the prince and captain of his guard, the only Black character in the film, who proves his worth in the end.  

 

She meets the price-not knowing who he is-not at the ball but out riding when she saves a stag from his hunting party.  He appreciates being treated as a person rather than royalty and is upset when she leaves without telling him who she is. 

 

The next part goes true to form and they meet again at the ball where they really get together.  This upsets the king and his ministers who are pushing an alliance with a princess from a nearby country for state reasons.  When Ella and the king encounter each other she changes his mind.  Of course the clock strikes twelve and she flees losing her shoe and all returning to normal. (I found this scene with horses, footman etc. returning to mice, lizards et al amazing as it was not animated but looked so real you could almost believe it could happen).

 

On his deathbed the king realizes his son would be a better ruler with Ella and tells him to find and marry her.   The rest goes as the cartoon did; stepmother tries to ruin it all but Ella’s animal friends save the day. 

 

There are some heavy weights here; Cate Blanchett, Helena Bonham Carter,  and Derek Jacobi among others.  It’s costumes and sets are spectacular and beautifully photographed .  There’s original music plus some from the 1951 version.  It’s about an hour and a half but seems longer and that’s not in a bad way.  WOW!

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CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF.    Amazing performances by Liz, Paul and Burl Ives.  To think how Liz kept herself together even after the death of Michael Todd while she was filming it.

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The Sign of the Cross (1914) youtube

 

I found this by accident on youtube. I wasn’t aware the film still existed.  Apparently a company in The Netherlands has it. There are two prints online, both of which have Dutch title cards. The lesser print has English subtitles to the cards, and I would recommend that one to anyone who is not familiar with the story. Having just read the novel, I went with the better print. Both prints are 67 minutes (four reels), no musical accompaniment.

 

This is a pretty good adaptation of the novel, faithful in most respects, including the climax. And the sets are impressive considering the time period.

 

Testosterone-laden William Farnum stars as the Roman Prefect Marcus Superbus. Don’t confuse him with his incompetent predecessor, Marcus Belowaveragus. Marcus falls for the Christian girl Mercia. This causes problems, since Nero has just ordered Marcus to kill all the Christians. There are wild scenes of a party at Marcus’ pad, where his friends make fun of Mercia, until Marcus throws them all the hell out. The finale pits Christians vs. the Lions. If these were the Detroit Lions, at least the Christians would have a chance.

 

Rosina Henley, as Mercia, is not unattractive, but, on the other hand, not someone I’d lose my life over. Ethel Grey Terry plays Berenice, the woman who lusts after Marcus. In the scene where he rejects her, she looks like she suddenly gets a case of IBS. I wanted to see more of Sheridan Block, who plays Nero. He seems to be wearing dreamcatcher earrings, and, in one scene, goes s p a s t i c (yes, that word was censored here)  in the manner of Jay Robinson doing Caligula in The Robe.  Charles Vernon, as the chubby, drunken Glabrio, definitely plays his role as "flamboyant."

 

Worth a look, and something TCM should try to get hold of. I’d like to see the 1932 version as well – I hear it’s pretty wild.

 

 

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The Sign of the Cross (1914) youtube

 

Worth a look, and something TCM should try to get hold of. I’d like to see the 1932 version as well – I hear it’s pretty wild.

 

 

 

 

DeMille's 1932 version is a pre code feast of sexually charged scenes, kinkiness and sadism. Any of the scenes involving the Christians will largely put you to sleep but you'll be awakened by those pagan Roman sequences.

 

69cb9bad759b336f2af477f821780a22.jpg

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DeMille's 1932 version is a pre code feast of sexually charged scenes, kinkiness and sadism. Any of the scenes involving the Christians will largely put you to sleep but you'll be awakened by those pagan Roman sequences.

 

69cb9bad759b336f2af477f821780a22.jpg

 

Good thing this was a PRE-code film then, huh Tom.

 

(...or else before this scene was shot, Miss Landi here would have had to have told her director.. "No, I DON'T think I'm ready for my close-up yet, Mr. DeMille.")

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Good thing this was a PRE-code film then, huh Tom.

 

(...or else before this scene was shot, Miss Landi here would have had have told her director, "No, I DON'T think I'm ready for my close yet, Mr. DeMille.")

 

Actually that's not Elissa, Dargo. It's an anonymous, scantily clad (of course) Christian in the Roman Colosseum scene. This film thinks up all kinds of perverse sadistic ways to knock off Christians. Another near naked woman is stretched out screaming as alligators close in upon her, there are pygmies fighting Amazon women, one of them skewered by a sword and raised over the Amazon's head; another Christian is tied to the ground as an elephant approaches, ready to crush him, etc., etc..

 

There is also a scene in which the camera lingers upon a woman's foot as she's taking off her sandals. That didn't mean too much to me until I later learned that DeMille had a "thing" about women's feet.

 

Of course, the film is also famous for Claudette Colbert's bath in a s s e s' milk, as well as Charles Laughton's effeminate take on Nero.

 

But in reference to your original mention of Elissa Landi, one of the more noteworthy scenes is this one, with a woman performing The Dance of the Naked Moon all around Landi, a dance that has clear lesbian overtones.

 

ancaria.jpg

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"Portrait in Black" (1960--Starring Lana Turner, Anthony Quinn, Sandra Dee, Richard Basehart, and Rajah, the all knowing housecat.  Produced by Ross Hunter, directed by Michael Gordon.

 

Would-be film noir has gaping plot holes a tank could drive through, ludicrous situations, and a good performance from an unlikely source.

 

Sheila, the second Mrs. Cabot (Turner) is mega rich, but unhappy.  She is married to cruel Peter Cabot (Dennis Kohler), owner of a shipping line that is the source of Mrs. Cabots' wealth.  He is dying of an unnamed disease.  Mr. Cabots' doctor is David Rivera (Quinn), who is having an affair with Sheila.  Instead of letting nature take its' course, David comes up with the idea of murdering Mr. Cabot, so Sheila and David can be together.  

 

After Mr. Cabot's funeral, Sheila gets a blackmailing letter.  Is it from:  the inscrutable Oriental housekeeper (Anna May Wong)?  The chauffeur with a out of control gambling habit (Ray Walston)?  The secretary who had had a long term affair with Mr. Cabot (Virginia Lee)?  The son whose father was cheated out of Cabot Shipping (John Saxon)?  The first Mrs. Cabot's daughter (Dee), who suspects her stepmother is "stepping out" on Daddy?  Or the Associate CEO of Cabot Shipping, who has had the hots for Sheila for years?

 

The actors eat the scenery in this one, with the best performances given by Ray Walston and Sandra Dee.

 

"Significant" looks are as common in this film as death rays are in 50's sci-fi movies.  Three more of the absurdities:

 

Sheila thrashes about in bed at night, wracked with guilt, then gets up, clothes and makeup perfect, and hair unmussed.  For reasons of plot, Sheila doesn't know how to drive, yet when she must, she drives a car along a curving road, in the dark, in the rain--but can't even figure out how to turn on the windshield wipers!

 

For those who think things like grammar and word choice don't matter: the killer gives himself away  by both ways three times in a single conversation.

 

Rajah, the house cat does his utmost to alert people of danger and who is guilty of what.

 

The final words of the film are "Oh, shi....!".  Fill in the blank as to what you think the word may be.

 

Film boasts a lush musical score credited to four composers.

 

Film is 2.2/4 or on a "so bad, it's good" scale, 2.9/4.

 

Source--archive.org.

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Thanks for the correction here, Tom.

 

It's been quite a while since I've watched this one, and so I just figured the lady about to be mauled there must have been the heroine and lead actress of the film.

 

(...in closing, Quo Vadis, dude) ;)

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Old Glory (1939).

 

Uncle Sam (voiced by Shepperd Strudwick) teaches Porky Pig the importance of American values.

 

This is an odd short, in part because there is by design no humor here. If it had been made in World War II, that would make sense. But it came out in 1939.

 

The other interesting thing is the use of rotoscoping to animate all the figures from American history. (Archive sound of John Litel from an early WB live-action short is used for Patrick Henry's voice.) The rotoscoping is excellent, and makes the short worth a watch.

 

8/10 for the rotoscoping; 5/10 for the rest.

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"Kong:  Skull Island" ( 2017 )

 

Recently went to see this movie on its second run.  Have never much cared for the King Kong movies, and "monster" films in general I can give or take, but the late Spring-early Summer releases this year have been a bit off.  SO... decided to check this film out.  Glad I did, an entertaining film this was.  Not much in the way of characters...basically a HUGE CGI ape defends the homeland against outsiders and various other extra large creatures.  BUT...is what it is, an entertaining film.  

 

This film isn't "Pride and Prejudice" or "A Streetcar Named Desire", and thankfully its not designed to be.  No dull and watered down drama film here, this one is silly but fast paced and entertaining.  Solid watch.  Props to John C. Reilly, he had the best role.

 

 

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Old Glory (1939).

 

Uncle Sam (voiced by Shepperd Strudwick) teaches Porky Pig the importance of American values.

 

This is an odd short, in part because there is by design no humor here. If it had been made in World War II, that would make sense. But it came out in 1939.

 

That would be when an prewar-isolationist FDR administration would have been trying to push the Pledge of Allegiance into schools and every public function, which the entire short seems to be a government public-service infomercial for.

 

It's not meant to be actual Warner/Looney "history" like Yankee Doodle Bugs:

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x3ui6x0_yankee-doodle-bugs_fun

("Well, they're T-tacks now, haw-haw!" cracked me up into the Sillies when I was a kid, and still does.)

 

Fletcher Christian

Kong:  Skull Island" ( 2017 )

 

Recently went to see this movie on its second run.  Have never much cared for the King Kong movies, and "monster" films in general I can give or take, but the late Spring-early Summer releases this year have been a bit off.  SO... decided to check this film out.  Glad I did, an entertaining film this was.  Not much in the way of characters...basically a HUGE CGI ape defends the homeland against outsiders and various other extra large creatures.  BUT...is what it is, an entertaining film.  

 

Well, on its second run was pretty much the only place you could see it, after Disney fangirls drove a steamroller over it last March...

 

Still, given that--like a certain failed Tom Cruise monster movie this past week--"what it was" was supposed to be the flagship for a new Corporate Franchise Universe instead of its own actual independent A-B story unto itself, didn't you think that Kong would, I dunno, go to NYC, sightsee all the tall skyscrapers, and maybe, oh, climb one of them, or something?  

Maybe meet a nice girl, even though he couldn't fall off the building and she could end up 'twas-killing him, because they needed him for after the next Godzilla sequel?

 

Instead, we get something with Vietnam soldiers, and...notice how even the POSTER tries to parody the Marlon Brando "Apocalypse Now" poster?

 

(Let's just pass the popcorn and see what happens to instant non-comic-book "Franchise Crossover Universes" after Universal's Folly.

Sony tried to make one out of Ghostbusters, and that's two down...)  

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