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Silver Dollar (1932) - Based on the life of 19th century politician Horace Tabor. Here named Yates Martin (Edward G. Robinson), he's a gold prospector who travels to the Colorado frontier with wife Aline MacMahon. He eventually becomes a rich merchant and a prime beneficiary of the Colorado silver boom, which makes him even wealthier. He uses his money to enter politics, growing ever more ambitious. However, his decision to divorce his wife for entertainer Bebe Daniels marks the beginning of his downfall.

Robinson made a number of films with this basic plot: a man starting out with nothing achieves great success through force of will, only to have his love of the wrong woman lead to his undoing. His nouveau riche tastes are also frequently a source of amusement, as they are here with his desire to build a high-class opera house, but insisting on all of the inscriptions being in "American". Robinson is good, as is MacMahon (although she's not given much to do here), but the whole thing is just a bit too routine. This does feature one of the few cinematic depictions of President Chester Arthur, though, so there's that.   (6/10)

Source: TCM

silverdollar.jpg?w=253&h=400

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Sinners in the Sun (1932) - Pre-Code romance starring Carole Lombard as a dress-shop mannequin/model who dreams of living the rich life. Her auto mechanic boyfriend Chester Morris just wants to get married and settle down, but she insists on being wealthy, so the two split up. She ends up being the kept woman of a rich married guy, while Morris ends up being the chauffeur/lover of rich woman Adrienne Ames. But can money truly buy happiness or self-respect? Also featuring Alison Skipworth, and Cary Grant, in his second movie, as another rich suitor.

The allure of wealth was particularly strong during the Depression years, and this film deals with the subject in a largely superficial manner. I don't want to give away where things end up, but it's not too hard to guess, even within the first 10 minutes of the movie. Lombard is okay, and Morris is just barely adequate, but I liked Ames, an actress whose work I'm not too familiar with. Grant doesn't have much to do but look handsome. There are some funny pre-Code lines, like when one model tells another ,"You're sitting on what I want", to which she replies , "PUH-leeze!" There's also the obligatory scenes of ladies in undergarments that seem to appear in most pre-Codes. In one scene, Lombard is attending a night-time party, and she finds the men have all gone down to the beach, changed into unitards, and are wrestling in the moonlight. As Lombard changes into a swimsuit to try and attract one of their number, I couldn't help but think that probably wasn't the right pond for her to be fishing in. Despite that, she does lure one rich guy away, who very quickly decides to paw at her and force himself on her - in those days it was called "coming on too strong" but now it would be attempted rape. Ah, the good ole days! :wacko:  (6/10)

Source: YouTube.

MV5BZjc1ZDhiMDktMmIwNy00MmNjLWE1ZmQtZTcw

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7 minutes ago, TomJH said:

One of the problems in viewing Sinners in the Sun is the wretched quality of the prints available of this film today.

The version I watched appeared to have been recorded from a TV broadcast. That being said, I've seen a lot worse on YouTube.

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6 Hours to Live (1932) - Ludicrous obscurity from Fox and director William Dieterle. Warner Baxter is a diplomat from a fictitious country attending a contentious economic summit. When he refuses to agree to a proposal that would harm his nation's people, he is assassinated. Thankfully for him, his girlfriend (Miriam Jordan) has an eccentric father who dabbles in scientific inventions, and he happens to be hosting another fringe scientist who has brought along his new invention: a device that emits rays that resuscitate dead creatures, but only for 6 hours. They use it on Baxter, who sets out to finish the economic summit and discover who killed him. Also featuring John Boles, Halliwell Hobbes, Beryl Mercer as The Widow, and Irene Ware as The Prostitute.

The ridiculous plot doesn't add up to much excitement,  and most viewers will be yelling at the screen at Baxter for wasting big chunks of his few remaining hours on clunky dialogue and half-baked philosophies on death. There is one stand-out scene though, when the scientist's deaf-mute assistant volunteers to be a human electrical conductor after a wire breaks, ensuring that the power gets to where it needs to be. And he's none the worse for wear afterward!   (6/10)

Source: YouTube.

f4bd5c3494a45ab5b113a95c42767967.jpg

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 After finding an available DVD copy at the library after the rush following Jerry Lewis's obits, I finally grit my teeth in curiosity to sit down and watch The Nutty Professor (1963):

It was an older copy, so Lewis was interviewed on the featurette about critics' constant belief he was parodying Dean Martin in his portrayal of obnoxious crooner Buddy Love--Lewis kept saying that despite their disputes, he still loved Dean and wouldn't dream of smearing him like that, that he picked a general-depiction character and most of the comparisons were drawn just by the outfit and the greased hair.  Having sat down and watched it, I'll not only side with him for the record that he's not doing anything that even remotely resembles Dino, but--given that Jerry never had much standing with the Rat Pack because of his breakup with Dean--in voice, singing, body language, line delivery, and general gangster-abusiveness by his character even for comedy, he's doing one of the most thorough intimately-studied and dead-on parodies of Frank Sinatra you could do in 1963 and live :blink: ...If it finally helps break the myth, I'll contribute my own small part.  

Buddy_Love.jpg

My teeth-gritting was over the prospect of an hour and a half of seeing Lewis do his nerd-dressup act as Julius Kelp of the title--But in the interview, Lewis said that he'd remembered some actual nerdy fan he'd encountered on a train trip, and also thoroughly studied the voice and mannerisms for the performance.  He must have, because he stays absolutely in character to the last detail, and it's the most focused and disciplined comedy we've ever seen him do in his own directed comedies, where he usually just keeps the camera on himself and thinks that if he drags "business" out for twice as long, it's twice as funny.

As the obits said, he was a broken clock that had to be right once.

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So Big! (1932) - Meandering, quirky, satisfying generational drama from Warner Brothers and director William Wellman, based on Edna Ferber's book. Barbara Stanwyck stars as a young woman with a proper, big city upbringing who is forced by circumstance into becoming a school teacher in a rural farming community. She eventually marries a farmer, and becomes a hard-working farm wife. Years later, her grown son Dirk (Hardie Albright) risks becoming a lazy dilettante and kept lover, but artist Bette Davis helps him see the error of his ways. Also featuring Earle Foxe, Alan Hale, Robert Warwick, Dickie Moore, Mae Madison, Dick Winslow, Anne Shirley, and George Brent.

The story's literary origin is evident in the wandering storyline, but that adds to the off-beat feel of this movie, which could easily have devolved into soap opera sentimentality. There are a lot of strange, unique characters and characterizations, and a number of humorous lines. Stanwyck and Davis are both good, and I liked Foxe as the farmer husband. It appears that some amount of the originally filmed footage was scrapped, which may have filled in some blanks, and the ending is a bit abrupt, but neither are serious complaints. This was remade in 1953 with Jane Wyman and Sterling Hayden (I haven't seen it). Recommended.  (8/10)

Source: TCM.

So%20Big%201932-500x500.jpg

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The Devil's Own (1966) has to be one of the most insane witchcraft in small-town England movies ever made. Joan Fontaine is purportedly the star of this picture, but it is English actress Kay Walsh in the second female lead who really monopolizes the picture and brings it to its crazy end.

Walsh was a preeminent English actress, married to David Lean at one time, and starring with Sir Alec Guinness in five films, including Oliver Twist, Last Holiday and Scrooge. She first made an impression in In Which We Serve and she won a BAFTA nomination for Best Actress in The Horse's Mouth. She even collaborated with Lean, helping to write and edit his movies, and acting in several.

I'm not sure how she ended up as the kinky head of a devil worshipping cult, wearing a buck's horn headdress, chanting some foreign language and preparing to sacrifice the town's teenage virgin, so that she (Walsh) could extend her life as a young and beautiful girl again.

The choreography, if you can call it that, was incredible: Walsh in her crazy robes and horns shouted commands to the hypnotized townspeople who responded by writhing on the floor, lifting first one arm then another, lifting right leg then left; eating sacred slithery mud that Walsh has blessed and thrown to them; then simulating **** on the floor with the nearest member of the opposite sex. 

This movie has to be seen to be believed. It has just enough fanatical elements to move it along: Fontaine suffers a nervous breakdown in Africa due to voodoo, then moves to England and finds a local cult in the tiny country town she has come to recover in. Walsh and her cracked brother take her in and there she learns about the local cult. There's a crazy grandma who works her own kind of magic with potions; a sadistic butcher who skins and guts rabbits at the counter of his shop; someone putting voodoo dolls in the trees; and somehow it all comes together and works.

The final sacrifice scene, which Fontaine succeeds in foiling, is worth the price of admission. Though there are lots of these witchcraft genre movies that are terrible, this one stands out.

 

 

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"Frenchman's Creek" (1944)--Starring Joan Fontaine, Arturo de Cordova, Basil Rathbone, and Cecil Kellaway. Directed by Mitchell Leisen.

I found a copy of the film that is NOT washed-out on archive.org. The copy is from a television broadcast, but is MUCH better than the copy TCM showed in 2016. Colors are shown, nothing is whited out, the details are a bit fuzzy, but this copy is the best I've found on the Net, until a better copy is found , or until TCM broadcasts a much better copy.

In 1600s England, Lady Dona St. Columb (Fontaine) fights with her husband Harry (Ralph Forbes) about going to a party. They go, and while there she is cornered by Lord Rockingham (Rathbone) and kissed. Her husband allows this because he owes Rockingham a large sum of money. The next morning, Dona moves out, with her children, servants, and luggage and goes to their Cornwall estate. There, while exploring in the woods, she is kidnapped by a pirate, who delivers her to the ship of his captain Jean Aubery (de Cordova). The two flirt and fall in love/lust.

The film is truly beautiful to look at, with stunning art direction and costumes. It's obvious why the film won the Oscar for Best Art Direction. The fashions of Restoration England suit Fontaine, and she looks wonderful. She gives a performance radically different from her previous work. She's a delight as a born flirt, and makes the movie enjoyable. Rathbone manages to be menacing, even in a long curled wig, in clothes with almost as much lace as Fontaine's. De Cordova is not much of an actor, but his flirting with Fontaine is fun to watch. Kellaway is good, as always.

A very enjoyable piece of romantic nonsense. When watched on a good print, film is most worth seeing. 3.1/4.

Source--archive.org. Archived as "Gaivota Negra 1944". Will be the only result.

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2 hours ago, marcar said:

The Devil's Own (1966) has to be one of the most insane witchcraft in small-town England movies ever made. Joan Fontaine is purportedly the star of this picture, but it is English actress Kay Walsh in the second female lead who really monopolizes the picture and brings it to its crazy end.

Walsh was a preeminent English actress, married to David Lean at one time, and starring with Sir Alec Guinness in five films, including Oliver Twist, Last Holiday and Scrooge. She first made an impression in In Which We Serve and she won a BAFTA nomination for Best Actress in The Horse's Mouth. She even collaborated with Lean, helping to write and edit his movies, and acting in several.

I'm not sure how she ended up as the kinky head of a devil worshipping cult, wearing a buck's horn headdress, chanting some foreign language and preparing to sacrifice the town's teenage virgin, so that she (Walsh) could extend her life as a young and beautiful girl again.

The choreography, if you can call it that, was incredible: Walsh in her crazy robes and horns shouted commands to the hypnotized townspeople who responded by writhing on the floor, lifting first one arm then another, lifting right leg then left; eating sacred slithery mud that Walsh has blessed and thrown to them; then simulating **** on the floor with the nearest member of the opposite sex. 

This movie has to be seen to be believed. It has just enough fanatical elements to move it along: Fontaine suffers a nervous breakdown in Africa due to voodoo, then moves to England and finds a local cult in the tiny country town she has come to recover in. Walsh and her cracked brother take her in and there she learns about the local cult. There's a crazy grandma who works her own kind of magic with potions; a sadistic butcher who skins and guts rabbits at the counter of his shop; someone putting voodoo dolls in the trees; and somehow it all comes together and works.

The final sacrifice scene, which Fontaine succeeds in foiling, is worth the price of admission. Though there are lots of these witchcraft genre movies that are terrible, this one stands out.

 

 

I agree about this crazy devil worship film.  I watched it recently,  as a devout Joan Fontaine fan.  In recent years I discovered Kay Walsh too.  She was very appealing in several films.  I enjoyed every film this gentle actress appeared in.  I like her  performance in Scrooge and the other films mentioned here.  Also, I recently saw her as a sympathetic school principal in Now and Forever, with Janette Scott.  She also co-starred with Margaret Lockwood and Sir Dirk Bogard in Cast a Dark Shadow.  In this last one, she arrives at their home unexpectedly one evening, following car trouble.  Her real reason for appearing there is soon readily apparent and just might save a life....

You are right about the Choreography of the costumes in The Devil's Own.    IT is all bizarre, to say the least.  However, everything ties in with still lovely Joan Fontaine becoming embroiled in another cult after recovering from another traumatic experience dealing with a similar type of experience...  An unlikely assembly of devil worshippers follows.

Ultimately, in the shocking denouement, Joan's character seems dwarfed from the gigantic figures surrounding her.   The ending has to be seen to be believed.

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42 minutes ago, film lover 293 said:

"Frenchman's Creek" (1944)--Starring Joan Fontaine, Arturo de Cordova, Basil Rathbone, and Cecil Kellaway. Directed by Mitchell Leisen.

I found a copy of the film that is NOT washed-out on archive.org. The copy is from a television broadcast, but is MUCH better than the copy TCM showed in 2016. Colors are shown, nothing is whited out, the details are a bit fuzzy, but this copy is the best I've found on the Net, until a better copy is found , or until TCM broadcasts a much better copy.

In 1600s England, Lady Dona St. Columb (Fontaine) fights with her husband Harry (Ralph Forbes) about going to a party. They go, and while there she is cornered by Lord Rockingham (Rathbone) and kissed. Her husband allows this because he owes Rockingham a large sum of money. The next morning, Dona moves out, with her children, servants, and luggage and goes to their Cornwall estate. There, while exploring in the woods, she is kidnapped by a pirate, who delivers her to the ship of his captain Jean Aubery (de Cordova). The two flirt and fall in love/lust.

The film is truly beautiful to look at, with stunning art direction and costumes. It's obvious why the film won the Oscar for Best Art Direction. The fashions of Restoration England suit Fontaine, and she looks wonderful. She gives a performance radically different from her previous work. She's a delight as a born flirt, and makes the movie enjoyable. Rathbone manages to be menacing, even in a long curled wig, in clothes with almost as much lace as Fontaine's. De Cordova is not much of an actor, but his flirting with Fontaine is fun to watch. Kellaway is good, as always.

A very enjoyable piece of romantic nonsense. When watched on a good print, film is most worth seeing. 3.1/4.

Source--archive.org. Archived as "Gaivota Negra 1944". Will be the only result.

I have a lovely print of Frenchman's Creek as well from TV.  The colors are lovely, and most of all, Joan Fontaine is gorgeous and appealing.

Lady Dona (Joan Fontaine), convinces her husband to go to a party  He reluctantly decides to attend,  as it is thrown by Lord Rockingham (Basil Rathbone)   He owes the lecherous Rockingham a great deal of money, so he allows him to make passes at his wife.  She is repelled by his actions and leaves the party to return to their Cornwall estate.

Lady Dona is kidnapped by a pirate as she explores the woods around their estate.  When he delivers her to the handsome ship's captain Jean Aubrey, (Arturo de Cordova),  the two flirt and fall in love.  Joan is  a natural born flirt and is beautifui to look at in the clothes of Restoration England.  The sumptuous sets, gorgeous scenery, and engrossing story make this film intriguing to watch. 

The story takes a shocking turn involving Lord Rockingham, the menacing character who forced himself on Lady Dona earlier.  He discovers the hideout of the pirate's ship and threatens Lady Dona.  His body is discovered soon after he has fallen down the stairs, and the lovely Dona is not suspected.  Her husband (Forbes), a good friend of Rockingham, is saddened and figures he had been drinking too much..  Also, Lady Dona finds that her new love is actually being captured. 

As she copes with these inevitable stumbling blocks in her life, she looks lovelier than ever.  The film glides to its inevitable conclusion, as the saddened Lady Dona turns to her unexciting husband and her young children.

Though Daphne DuMaurier's book is not as exciting as the superb Rebecca, it is also graced by the beautiful Joan Fontaine.  I give it a 4 out of 5.

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9 hours ago, film lover 293 said:

"Frenchman's Creek" (1944)--Starring Joan Fontaine, Arturo de Cordova, Basil Rathbone, and Cecil Kellaway. Directed by Mitchell Leisen.

I found a copy of the film that is NOT washed-out on archive.org. The copy is from a television broadcast, but is MUCH better than the copy TCM showed in 2016. Colors are shown, nothing is whited out, the details are a bit fuzzy, but this copy is the best I've found on the Net, until a better copy is found , or until TCM broadcasts a much better copy.

In 1600s England, Lady Dona St. Columb (Fontaine) fights with her husband Harry (Ralph Forbes) about going to a party. They go, and while there she is cornered by Lord Rockingham (Rathbone) and kissed. Her husband allows this because he owes Rockingham a large sum of money. The next morning, Dona moves out, with her children, servants, and luggage and goes to their Cornwall estate. There, while exploring in the woods, she is kidnapped by a pirate, who delivers her to the ship of his captain Jean Aubery (de Cordova). The two flirt and fall in love/lust.

The film is truly beautiful to look at, with stunning art direction and costumes. It's obvious why the film won the Oscar for Best Art Direction. The fashions of Restoration England suit Fontaine, and she looks wonderful. She gives a performance radically different from her previous work. She's a delight as a born flirt, and makes the movie enjoyable. Rathbone manages to be menacing, even in a long curled wig, in clothes with almost as much lace as Fontaine's. De Cordova is not much of an actor, but his flirting with Fontaine is fun to watch. Kellaway is good, as always.

A very enjoyable piece of romantic nonsense. When watched on a good print, film is most worth seeing. 3.1/4.

Source--archive.org. Archived as "Gaivota Negra 1944". Will be the only result.

Wanted to thank you for posting about archive.org. I went to the site after I read your post and there are some great movies there, particulary some foreign films that I couldn't find anywhere else online or on Netflix DVD. I immediately signed up and started watching....again, thanks. It seems like a good source for classic films and some oddities too. sorry for the huge quote couldn't get the last line of your post to "quote" without getting the whole thing. I haven't watched "Frenchman's Creek" yet...but I plan to cause of your post.

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10 hours ago, film lover 293 said:

"Frenchman's Creek" (1944)--Starring Joan Fontaine, Arturo de Cordova, Basil Rathbone, and Cecil Kellaway. Directed by Mitchell Leisen.

 

I have always found Frenchman's Creek to be a visually lovely but silly film. If only director Mitchell Leisen had been as concerned with the dramatics of his film as he obviously was with the sets and costumes. Joan Fontaine arguably never looked better but I have an exceedingly difficult time drumming up much sympathy for this woman who turns her back on her foppish husband and child in order to have a fling with a "dashing" French pirate (as played with a minimum of charismatic charm by Arturo de Cordova).

SPOILER ALERT: And the ending, in which she gives up her "great love" in self sacrificing style for the sake of her child rings particularly hollow. Come on! Where was this great concern for that child throughout the film? When the film has five minutes to go she suddenly remembers she's a Mommy. Give me a break!

But the colour cinematography by George Barnes (for a while married to Joan Blondell) is terrific, if you can find a good print, that is (glad to hear the one on archive.org is decent, filmlover) and the romantic musical score by Victor Young is truly lovely.

Basil Rathbone's supporting villainy is fun but, in all honesty, he doesn't really have that much to do in the film until towards the end. Well, a little of Rathbone is better than none. But that wig that he wears for many of his early scenes, almost like a poodle landed on his head and drooped down past his shoulders, is a tad distracting, to say the least.

frenchmans1.jpg.a93ab7733e19abcc1013f3680dd66da1.jpg

Basil with his untrimmed poodle look

 

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12 hours ago, marcar said:

The Devil's Own (1966) has to be one of the most insane witchcraft in small-town England movies ever made. Joan Fontaine is purportedly the star of this picture, but it is English actress Kay Walsh in the second female lead who really monopolizes the picture and brings it to its crazy end.

Walsh was a preeminent English actress, married to David Lean at one time, and starring with Sir Alec Guinness in five films, including Oliver Twist, Last Holiday and Scrooge. She first made an impression in In Which We Serve and she won a BAFTA nomination for Best Actress in The Horse's Mouth. She even collaborated with Lean, helping to write and edit his movies, and acting in several.

I'm not sure how she ended up as the kinky head of a devil worshipping cult, wearing a buck's horn headdress, chanting some foreign language and preparing to sacrifice the town's teenage virgin, so that she (Walsh) could extend her life as a young and beautiful girl again.

The choreography, if you can call it that, was incredible: Walsh in her crazy robes and horns shouted commands to the hypnotized townspeople who responded by writhing on the floor, lifting first one arm then another, lifting right leg then left; eating sacred slithery mud that Walsh has blessed and thrown to them; then simulating **** on the floor with the nearest member of the opposite sex. 

This movie has to be seen to be believed. It has just enough fanatical elements to move it along: Fontaine suffers a nervous breakdown in Africa due to voodoo, then moves to England and finds a local cult in the tiny country town she has come to recover in. Walsh and her cracked brother take her in and there she learns about the local cult. There's a crazy grandma who works her own kind of magic with potions; a sadistic butcher who skins and guts rabbits at the counter of his shop; someone putting voodoo dolls in the trees; and somehow it all comes together and works.

The final sacrifice scene, which Fontaine succeeds in foiling, is worth the price of admission. Though there are lots of these witchcraft genre movies that are terrible, this one stands out.

 

 

Sound like you're saying it is so bad it is good.  (ha ha).   I have seen the film and the first 1\3 or so is fairly routine in the 'something odd is going on' mode with Joan in the middle.    But yea as the film reveals what this 'something is' it starts to go off the rails until its very campy ending.   

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1 hour ago, marcar said:

sorry for the huge quote couldn't get the last line of your post to "quote" without getting the whole thing.

Just a quick tip for this. If you go to the post you'd like to quote and highlight a selection of text, a little black box that says "Quote this" will pop up. Click on that, and it will add only your selected text as a quote to your post. Hope this helps!

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1 minute ago, Stevomachino said:

Just a quick tip for this. If you go to the post you'd like to quote and highlight a selection of text, a little black box that says "Quote this" will pop up. Click on that, and it will add only your selected text as a quote to your post. Hope this helps!

I just found this out yesterday when I was planning on doing the old 'copy \ paste' to quote only a portion of someone's post and the 'quote this' popped up.    Niffy function that I'll be using.    

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1 minute ago, Stevomachino said:

Hope this helps!

Thank you so much. It did.  I have never noticed that black box. My posts will be greatly improved thanks to you. I always have this huge quote box when I just wanted to pick out something specific. Again, can't thank you enough

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The Son-Daughter (1932) - A prime example of Golden Age Hollywood "Yellow-Face" melodrama, from MGM and director Clarence Brown, based on a play. There's a rebellion against the Machurian emperor in China, and residents of San Francisco's Chinatown are sending money and supplies to help the rebels. Meanwhile, agents of the Emperor seek to thwart these efforts, and frequently resort to murder to do so. Caught in the middle of this are young lovers Helen Hayes and Ramon Novarro. Also featuring Warner Oland, Lewis Stone, Ralph Morgan, and H.B. Warner.

Everyone in the cast is playing a Chinese character, and the performances range from embarrassing to cringe-worthy. Novarro, who was having trouble transitioning to sound films, was targeted for much critical scorn at the time, although I didn't think he was especially worse than anyone else, and they were all saddled with a cornball script full of exaggerated East Asian stereotyping. I enjoyed the ending, though.   (5/10)

Source: TCM.

1932thesondaughter1.jpg

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A Strange Adventure (1932) - aka The Wayne Murder Case. Cheap, poorly acted mystery from Monogram and director Phil Whitman. When a miserable old codger is murdered, the list of potential killers is long, including Dwight Frye, Lucille La Verne, Eddie Phillips, Nadine Dore, Alan Roscoe, Isabel Vecki, and Jason Robards Sr. They all wanted his money and/or a large diamond. Police detective Regis Toomey doesn't show up until 20 minutes into the less-than-an-hour feature, and top-billed June Clyde, as a reporter with the incredible character name of Nosey Toodles, isn't in it until nearly ten minutes after that. Fred "Snowflake" Toones shows up for some badly-dated comic relief. There's a person running around in a black cloak and mask to try and make things interesting.   (4/10)

Source: YouTube.

42091d726fe504410ef15c7623778608--movie-

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Strange Interlude (1932) - MGM and director Robert Z. Leonard present this adaptation of the Eugene O'Neil play. Norma Shearer is distraught when her beloved is killed in WW1. She impulsively marries Alexander Kirkland, while both Ralph Morgan and Clark Gable pine for her as well. She eventually has a son who grows up into Robert Young, who wants to marry Maureen O'Sullivan, much to Norma's consternation. Also featuring May Robson and Henry B. Walthall.

The gimmick here as in the play is that the characters' inner monologues are heard on the soundtrack, illustrating their secret hopes, fears and desires. I found the movie to be pretentious, irritating, phony, overwrought, tedious and often silly. O'Neil himself said that the film was "censored into imbecility." I can't imagine sitting through 5 hours of this twaddle, which is how long the play ran. This was Gable's first important dramatic role (and he also debuts his mustache!), and he's not bad, but the whole movie is so annoying as to cast everyone in a bad light. This was only considered a modest hit (the play had been a smash, and was parodied in Animal Crackers two years earlier), although it still managed to be the #7 biggest box office hit of the year. I would rate this even lower, but the technical work (cinematography, sets) is excellent.    (4/10) 

Source: TCM. I recorded this back when Norma Shearer was Star of the Month, and this had an intro/outro by Robert Osborne. It was nice seeing him again.

1932strangeinterlude5.jpg

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Strange Interlude (1932) - But the whole movie is so annoying as to cast everyone in a bad light. This was only considered a modest hit (the play had been a smash, and was parodied in Animal Crackers two years earlier)

"If I were Eugene O'Neill, I could tell you what I really think of you two!"

 

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