Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

Strange Interlude was also parodied in the 1932 Fox movie Me and My Gal, in a scene where Spencer Tracy and Joan Bennett talked about having seen a movie called Strange Innertubes and then proceed to have that inner dialogue play out.

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Champagne Murders (1967) as part of the last day of the Anthony Perkins SOTM. I won't go into too much detail about this standard whodunit with Perkins playing an is-he-crazy or is-he-not post Norman Bates role and Maurice Ronet playing the French version of that same character. They were like twins...but were they killers?

SPOILER ALERT AHEAD

What I liked about this movie was the dual role played by French actress Stephane Audran. With a little black wig, brown contact lenses and buck teeth, she played the mousy secretary Jacqueline. With her natural blonde hair and blue eyes she played seductress Lydia who ended up as the culprit. 

I recognized her from some of my favorite movies: Babette's Feast, The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, Le Boucher and the Unfaithful Wife. She is a great actress.

Nobody else in the cast was very effective except for Audran and it was interesting to see her as a lovesick chick-on-the-side to the married Perkins, and as the faithful, bland secretary who gratefully took the orders of her mistress, Perkins' wife.

The final scene was staged uniquely by director Claude Chabrol and it was very effective. As Ronet, Perkins and Audran fight for a gun to kill each other for a variety of reasons, the camera pulls away from inside the red-carpeted bedroom where the three are wrestling around. The camera continues to pull away until just a small red square with the three writhing bodies is center-stage around a black border that just gets bigger and bigger. Then the Universal logo appears and that's the end.

You don't find out who won the fight and it makes for a great ending to, as I said. a pretty standard "who-is-the-killer" movie. It's worth watching for Audran's performance, though small in number of scenes; and for that last fighting shot.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

They Made me a Fugitive (AKA I Became a Criminal) (1947) Brit Noir Masterpiece

Poster+IBAC.jpg

WOW!!!, I would almost call this the best UK Noir, but I'd have to watch Night and the City again, and then of course there are probably many others that are off our noirdar screens here in the U.S. Films never watched. Anyway this has two titles not to be confused with the Garfield flick with a similar name. They Made Me a Criminal (1939)

This is Visual Art Noir, the team of Brazilian born Cavalcanti and the Czech Cinematographer Otto Heller, and the French born Set Designer Andrew Mazzei produced an excellent looking British Noir on par with the pairings of Siodmak and Franz Planer, Anthony Mann and John Alton, Richard Fleischer and George E. Diskant. The film was written by Noel Langley, based on the novel by Jackson Budd. 

This film is top notch, the acting is flawless, the addictive cinematography continuously interesting,  the final sequences are a maze of dark alleys waterfronts and railroad viaducts, nice job. Its always great to find a Noir off most people's radar.  Full review with screencaps in Film Noir/Gangster page


I'll be looking to pick this one up when I can 10/10

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Stickman (2017) - TV-movie supernatural thriller about a teenager (Hayley Law) who has been haunted by a killer demon/ghost/boogey-man (it's never explained) since she was a girl. Just as in the same year's The Bye Bye Man, anyone who says the name "Stickman" is then marked for death. Hayley proves to be deadly to be around, as first her family, and then others in a mental ward and a halfway house are targeted by the spindly menace. There was nothing noteworthy about this at all, but at least it wasn't abysmally awful.   (5/10)

Source: SyFy Channel.

hqdefault.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Night of Dark Shadows (1971) - Supernatural Gothic thriller/romance, inspired by the TV soap and directed by Dan Curtis. Eschewing the Barnabas Collins/vampire side of things, this follow-up to 1970's House of Dark Shadows concerns heir David Selby and his wife Kate Jackson (in her debut) taking up residence in his ancestral family manor. Unfortunately for the happily married couple, the house is haunted by the amorous spirit of Angelique (Lara Parker), a reputed witch who was killed centuries earlier. Her presence causes Selby to recall his past life as Angelique's illicit lover, and the scene is set for murder and torment. Also featuring Grayson Hall, John Karlen. Nancy Barrett, Jim Storm, and Thayer David.

This is told in roughly three sections: from Selby's point of view as the past-life mystery is unfolding; then from Jackson's point of view as she realizes something is dreadfully amiss with her husband; and then the final third as everyone tries to survive/put an end to things. Some things work here, but a lot more don't. There are some good, moody scenes, when the music and gauzy cinematography create an appropriately spectral ambiance. But there are lengthy deadly-dull stretches, and the performances are just barely adequate.   (5/10)

Source: TCM. 

VVwjy.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

"The Brood" (1979)--Starring Samantha Eggar, Oliver Reed, and Art Hindle. Directed by David Cronenberg.

Good, if somewhat confusing, horror film.

Nola (Eggar) is separated from her husband Frank (Hindle) and is undergoing therapy at a facility. Nola has an endless amount of rage over childhood and adulthood issues. Her therapist, Dr. Raglan (Reed) encourages her to fully express her rage. As a result of Raglan's encouragement and medicines never mentioned, Nola gives birth to homicidal "children of rage". This causes all sorts of trouble for those with any connection to her, especially her daughter Candice (Cindy Hinds). Strange things start happening to those with a connection to Nola.

Eggar is very good as a woman who is undergoing a mental breakdown. Reed is unsympathetic and smug as the psychiatrist who thinks he's going to make his reputation on Nola's case. Hinds is always trying to do the right thing and not succeeding.

Those allergic to gore might want to skip this; there is one scene near the end that will upset some viewers.

Cronenberg is always worth at least one view. This is one of his better films. I enjoyed it. 3.2/4

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

This is told in roughly three sections: from Selby's point of view as the past-life mystery is unfolding; then from Jackson's point of view as she realizes something is dreadfully amiss with her husband; and then the final third as everyone tries to survive/put an end to things. Some things work here, but a lot more don't. There are some good, moody scenes, when the music and gauzy cinematography create an appropriately spectral ambiance. But there are lengthy deadly-dull stretches, and the performances are just barely adequate.   (5/10)

Yea House of Dark Shadows is definitely better, than this Night of Dark Shadows sort of sequel to the first film based series based on the soap.  But if you watched any of the series both are lacking to what they were able to accomplish in the soap. Considering what they had to work with they accomplished a lot. I've also read that Night was cut down a bit in length. But the production values were much better obviously than the soap ever could be.

However the soap draaaaaaaaaagggggggggggssssssssss out the story lines a tad too much. A mini series would have probably worked best, which they did do later on in the reimagining in 1991, but it wasn't quite the same without the original cast.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

Yea House of Dark Shadows is definitely better, than this Night of Dark Shadows sort of sequel to the first film based series based on the soap.  But if you watched any of the series both are lacking to what they were able to accomplish in the soap. Considering what they had to work with they accomplished a lot. I've also read that Night was cut down a bit in length. But the production values were much better obviously than the soap ever could be.

However the soap draaaaaaaaaagggggggggggssssssssss out the story lines a tad too much. A mini series would have probably worked best, which they did do later on in the reimagining in 1991, but it wasn't quite the same without the original cast.

I saw most, though not all, of the original series, and recall the storyline from the second film in the show, although there were a great many differences. I also read that about the studio cutting nearly 30 minutes from Night of Dark Shadows. Maybe that would have fleshed things out a bit, but I didn't see as any plot elements were absent from the 90 minutes version, so I can't help but think the original would have seemed more overlong. It was also disconcerting seeing Grayson Hall and John Karlen from the show but not playing the same characters. That seemed like an odd decision on Curtis's part.

Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I saw most, though not all, of the original series, and recall the storyline from the second film in the show, although there were a great many differences. I also read that about the studio cutting nearly 30 minutes from Night of Dark Shadows. Maybe that would have fleshed things out a bit, but I didn't see as any plot element s were absent from the 90 minutes version, so I can't help but think the original would have seemed more overlong. It was also disconcerting seeing Grayson Hall and John Karlen from the show but not playing the same characters. That seemed like an odd decision on Curtis's part.

When I first watched the soap I was in high school, so I caught most of the show from Barnabas' arrival through the beginning of the Count Petofi 1890s storyline. It was also about the time the series switched from B&W to color. I remember that his dis-disembodied hand showed up first. Quentin (David Selby) was alive. Grayson Hall was playing Magda the gypsy, John Karlen was Quentin's brother Carl, Barnabas got there time traveling doing an E-Ching trance, and he pretended to be again from the English branch of the family . But then I took off for college, and I never saw beyond that until they produced the whole series 2000 plus episodes in a coffin box set. 

Once we got the set we watched it from the beginning. The first 200 episodes played more like a Film Noir with Gothic Novel like shenanigans. The first supernatural element injected was Rodger's nutty estranged wife who went off to Egypt and gets involved in a Phoenix Cult and disappears off the face of the earth. She shows up at Collinswood to claim back her son David. After that a scam artist friend of Elizabeth Collins' (Joan Bennett) missing husband Jason Mcguire shows up and blackmails Elizabeth (who thinks she killed him Jason buried him in a steamer trunk in the cellar), Jason brings along his weasley friend Willie Loomis (John Karlen) into the story at this point. Willie sees Barnabas' portrait with his jewels and thinks if he can get into the mausoleum he can get to Barnabas' coffin and the jewels will be easy pickins.

After Barnabas the different storylines were the origin of Barnabas circa 1797 which brings Angelique the witch into the Collinswood "universe", then we got a riff on Frankenstein with the Adam and Eve storyline, then we get Quentin the ghost who haunts Collinwood and possesses David Collins, this prompts Barnabas to time travel to the 1890s. The we get Count Petofi (Thayer David), then we get this weird Leviathans storyline (based on the works of  H. P. Lovecraft) which you'd think would have fit hand in glove with it but it didn't work. Then came a parallel time storyline 1970. Then we get another haunting of Collinwood with Gerad from 1840s who brought the disembodied head of warlock Jhuda Zachary into the the story. The final storyline was a parallel time 1840 storyline where it's back to another ghost story but Jonathan Frid and Lara Parker are just mere mortals. 

A lot of the main actors aside from Jonathan Frid played a variety of different characters over the course of the show. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

When I first watched the soap I was in high school, so I caught most of the show from Barnabas' arrival through the beginning of the Count Petofi 1890s storyline. It was also about the time the series switched from B&W to color. I remember that his dis-disembodied hand showed up first. Quentin (David Selby) was alive. Grayson Hall was playing Magda the gypsy, John Karlen was Quentin's brother Carl, Barnabas got there time traveling doing an E-Ching trance, and he pretended to be again from the English branch of the family . But then I took off for college, and I never saw beyond that until they produced the whole series 2000 plus episodes in a coffin box set. 

Once we got the set we watched it from the beginning. The first 200 episodes played more like a Film Noir with Gothic Novel like shenanigans. The first supernatural element injected was Rodger's nutty estranged wife who went off to Egypt and gets involved in a Phoenix Cult and disappears off the face of the earth. She shows up at Collinswood to claim back her son David. After that a scam artist friend of Elizabeth Collins' (Joan Bennett) missing husband Jason Mcguire shows up and blackmails Elizabeth (who thinks she killed him Jason buried him in a steamer trunk in the cellar), Jason brings along his weasley friend Willie Loomis (John Karlen) into the story at this point. Willie sees Barnabas' portrait with his jewels and thinks if he can get into the mausoleum he can get to Barnabas' coffin and the jewels will be easy pickins.

After Barnabas the different storylines were the origin of Barnabas circa 1797 which brings Angelique the witch into the Collinswood "universe", then we got a riff on Frankenstein with the Adam and Eve storyline, then we get Quentin the ghost who haunts Collinwood and possesses David Collins, this prompts Barnabas to time travel to the 1890s. The we get Count Petofi (Thayer David), then we get this weird Leviathans storyline (based on the works of  H. P. Lovecraft) which you'd think would have fit hand in glove with it but it didn't work. Then came a parallel time storyline 1970. Then we get another haunting of Collinwood with Gerad from 1840s who brought the disembodied head of warlock Jhuda Zachary into the the story. The final storyline was a parallel time 1840 storyline where it's back to another ghost story but Jonathan Frid and Lara Parker are just mere mortals. 

A lot of the main actors aside from Jonathan Frid played a variety of different characters over the course of the show. 

I've seen from the beginning through the original Barnabas story, to when it switched to color, and parts of the Angelique story. I missed the series the first time around, although I heard about it a lot and knew people that watched it. It wasn't until the SyFy channel showed them in reruns a long time back that I first watched them. In fact, I saw the 1990's version with Ben Cross as Barnabas before I saw the original show. I always think of Grayson Hall as the doctor, and Karlen as Willie Loomis. I knew they had alternate guises in the past storylines, but I've seen those less. Much like this weekend's Decades marathon of the show, they seem to only concentrate on the Barnabas storyline when they replay them. And alas I do not have access to that nice but expensive coffin set. Some of those other storylines sound very intriguing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Texas Cyclone (1932) - B-Western starring Tim McCoy as a new guy in town who everyone mistakes for a heroic rancher who went missing years earlier and was presumed dead. Through a series of circumstances too silly to relate, McCoy decides to go along with the charade that he's this hero, and help out the man's wife (Shirley Grey) who has been struggling to keep her ranch going in the face of incessant cattle rustling by the minions of bad guy Wheeler Oakman. McCoy finds help in nice-guy ranch hand John Wayne and old coot sheriff Walter Brennan.

This was the first McCoy Western that I've seen. He was a major Western star in the late silent period, and continued on with B Westerns throughout the 1930's into the 40's. He was a real cowboy, adept horseman, and expert on Native American cultures and customs. He's perhaps not the strongest actor or the most intimidating screen presence, but he's genuine, and I liked him well enough. Wayne doesn't have a lot to do, but he's not bad, and you can see why he was a bit of a sex symbol during the early years of his career. Brennan, in one of his biggest roles to date, was only in his late 30's, but already playing a gray-haired old goof. As for the movie, it won't make anyone's top ten lists, but there are a lot worse in the world of quickie B Westerns.   (6/10)

Source: YouTube.

41031700_p.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I've seen from the beginning through the original Barnabas story, to when it switched to color, and parts of the Angelique story. I missed the series the first time around, although I heard about it a lot and knew people that watched it. It wasn't until the SyFy channel showed them in reruns a long time back that I first watched them. In fact, I saw the 1990's version with Ben Cross as Barnabas before I saw the original show. I always think of Grayson Hall as the doctor, and Karlen as Willie Loomis. I knew they had alternate guises in the past storylines, but I've seen those less. Much like this weekend's Decades marathon of the show, they seem to only concentrate on the Barnabas storyline when they replay them. And alas I do not have access to that nice but expensive coffin set. Some of those other storylines sound very intriguing.

If you subscribe to Amazon Prime, you can watch the series there.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This Is the Night (1932) - Amusing romantic comedy with musical touches, from Paramount Pictures and director Frank Tuttle. Cary Grant is an Olympic athlete whose wife (Thelma Todd) has been having an affair with Roland Young while Grant's been away. When he comes home early and catches them in a compromising position, Todd and Young claim to just be friends, and that Young will be traveling with his (non-existent) wife to Venice soon. Grant suggests that they make it a foursome, so Young and his buddy Charlie Ruggles have to find a stand-in for Young's wife, settling on starving actress Lily Damita. Once in Venice, the five of them get into various romantic entanglements. 

This was Grant's debut, and he's not bad at all, even if he has a slightly harder edge at times. Damita is good as well, and Young and Ruggles are reliable comic actors, even though it was odd seeing Young as a romantic lead. There's a running gag about Todd's dress getting ripped off in public repeatedly, which helps denote this as a Pre-Code. The couple of scenes that are choreographed like a musical are also highlights. The outdoor nighttime scenes are tinted blue.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

1932thisisthenight3.jpg

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Tiger Shark (1932) - Melodrama about the lives and loves of San Diego tuna fishermen, from First National and director Howard Hawks. Edward G. Robinson is a "Port-uh-ghee" fishing boat captain with a hook hand who is best friends with his second mate Richard Arlen. Robinson helps out recent widow Zita Johann, and she agrees to marry him, although she starts falling in love with Arlen. The usual confrontation looms in their future. Also featuring Leila Bennett, Vince Barnett, Toshia Mori as a sexy lady barber, and J. Carrol Naish as a pimp.

This same character dynamic shows up over and over again; a coarse guy with a rough exterior but a good heart gets his emotions trampled when his wife/girlfriend/mate (who's way out of his league) falls for his hunkier friend/brother/son/employee. Robinson really hams it up with the accent, and he has fun with his hook hand, enjoying giving vigorous back-rubs to Arlen (read into it what you will). I thought Johann was very good, and gave the performance of the film. The best sections of the movie are probably the documentary-like passages showing actual fisherman catching tuna out of large schools of fish, battling the sharks that are inevitably drawn to the blood in the water, and the processing of the fish from the boat to the shore to the vendor.   (6/10)

Source: TCM.

tigershark2.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Lawrence, I think you'd enjoy both the 1890s story and the 1840s story on Dark Shadows. Thayer David as Count Petofi was a big favorite of mine.

Last night I saw some silent films: two Laurel & Hardy gems, Do Detectives Think? and That's My Wife, followed by the 1927 Paul Leni version of The Cat and the Canary. All were shown with an organist playing the accompaniment. Leni gave many German Expressionist touches to The Cat and the Canary. Laura La Plante looks much more modern than most silent stars. Flora Finch as Aunt Susan and Martha Maddox as Mammy Pleasant added many amusing touches. Creighton Hale does a good job as the nerdy hero, but if you've seen Bob Hope in the 1930s remake, that's a hard standard to match.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Last night I saw some silent films: two Laurel & Hardy gems, Do Detectives Think? and That's My Wife, followed by the 1927 Paul Leni version of The Cat and the Canary. All were shown with an organist playing the accompaniment. Leni gave many German Expressionist touches to The Cat and the Canary. Laura La Plante looks much more modern than most silent stars. Flora Finch as Aunt Susan and Martha Maddox as Mammy Pleasant added many amusing touches. Creighton Hale does a good job as the nerdy hero, but if you've seen Bob Hope in the 1930s remake, that's a hard standard to match.

 

Paul Leni's Cat and the Canary, with its beautiful camerawork, helped to set the standard for spooky house thrillers.

Having said that, I still love the Bob Hope version, one of my favourite thrillers, where Hope's nervous pattern is a perfect counterpoint to the stereotypical dark thrills.

One of my favourite Hope lines occurs when nervously excited Nydia Westman asks him, "Don't big empty houses scare you?"

"Not me,"Hope responds, "I used to be in vaudeville."

Hope's scaredy cat persona was developing when he made this film. In both this film and Ghost Breakers Hope convincingly played the nervous wise cracker who turns heroic when the chips are down and the heroine (Paulette Goddard in both films) is in mortal danger.

One of the key reasons that both Hope scare comedies work so well is that the thrills are played straight, both films further benefiting from striking black and white photography and eerie musical scores.

cat.jpg.9b02ee3adf3d637ad155b6a472cb0f09.jpg

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeepers Creepers 3 (2017) - Arriving 14 years after part 2, this latest installment in the supernatural monster movie series is a dreadful disappointment. Acting as a direct sequel to the first film from 2001, the story follows events from the following couple of days as the Creeper, a mysterious demonic killer of great power, continues his activities. He awakens every 23 years for only 23 days, during which he causes mayhem and kills and consumes fearful human victims. A contingent of law enforcement officers try to finish him off, but he's determined to reclaim a lost relic that has been hidden away by a local farm family. Featuring Stan Shaw, Meg Foster, Gabrielle Haugh, Brandon Smith, and Jonathan Breck as the Creeper.

Writer-director Victor Salva had trouble securing financing for this film, and it shows, with bad FX work and missing shots. There's also a surplus of badly-done green-screen work. A lot of time is devoted to the Creeper's distinctive truck, which is revealed to be loaded with booby traps. Besides the poor production values, this entry lacks interesting characters or a sense of dread and mystery (found in the first film), or any cleverly executed monster attack moments (as in the second).   (4/10)

Source: SyFy Channel.

jeepers-creepers-3-poster-s.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

The first supernatural element injected was Rodger's nutty estranged wife who went off to Egypt and gets involved in a Phoenix Cult and disappears off the face of the earth.

Actually the first supernatural element in the original DARK SHADOWS series was the appearance of the ghost of Josette Collins.

Later, when Matthew Morgan was holding Victoria Winters hostage in the Old House and told her he had decided to kill her, the ghost of Josette appeared to Victoria when she cried for help and told her not be afraid. When Matthew returned with his freshly sharpened axe, the ghosts of the Widows called Matthew's name. The ghosts moved toward Matthew and basically scared him to death, thus saving Victoria's life.

Link to post
Share on other sites

"Dracula A.D. 1972" (1972)--Starring Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing, and Stephanie Beachem. Directed by Alan Gibson.

Hammer was running out of ideas and props when they made this one. Alert viewers will notice the use of fancy tubes that were used in "Taste the Blood of Dracula" (TtBoD) (1970), except this time they contain Dracula's ashes instead of his dried blood. The signet ring Dracula wears looks like the one used in previous Hammer Draculas. The desecrated church set is similar, if not the same, as in previous films. The use of the last name Alucard will ring immediate bells with fans of Universal horror films. The ceremony in the church is distressingly similar to the one in TtBoD, except it's supposedly done for laughs. There are snorts and smiles scattered through the film, but only one line hits true camp status. One character, referring to a recently deceased character, says "Sure, she'll show up tomorrow; drained, but she'll show up!"

Lee as Dracula and Cushing as Van Helsing act rings around the rest of the cast. Beachem looks and acts as if she wished she were in one of Hammers' period Gothics. Hammer tried to make this film as part joke and part serious Gothic. The film doesn't work as parody or as a horror film because it can't decide what tone it wants to take. Lee, Cushing, and occasionally Beachem make the film worth a watch. I'm feeling generous tonight. 2.3/4.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

"Haxan: Witchcraft Through The Ages" (1922)  Before I comment on the movie itself, the music at the very beginning is used in the Grapevine Video release of "The Family Secret" (1924).  I hear it on occasion even on a "telephone hold".  Does anyone know the name of it?  I like the ending score, used Audacity to record it from the Youtube video (same as the TCM movie). Clicked REC at the 1:38:32 time mark, length 6:23 min.

 

Now about the movie, it's called HORROR, yeah right.  Anyone cracked a rib laughing at some of the scenes i.e. the devils demand from his followers on the Sabbath.:lol:

 

Will you kiss my ***.

Haxan+1922+-+Kissing+The+Devil%2527s+Anu

Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, hamradio said:

"Haxan: Witchcraft Through The Ages" (1922)  

Now about the movie, it's called HORROR, yeah right.  Anyone cracked a rib laughing at some of the scenes i.e. the devils demand from his followers on the Sabbath.:lol:

Which it isn't, since it's a documentary.  (The Criterion-restored version has the silent version with classical music, not the later sound version with jazz, and William Burroughs reading the narration.)

Most of the German-impressionist cavorting in devil costumes are depicting what medieval times believed, or what the accused claim was going on, claims made under various conditions of duress, torture, insanity or even revenge.
The majority of the movie is devoted to illustrating how "witch hunts" (not the Russian variety ;)) were used against the old, feeble and outcast as a way for the upper-class to find convenient scapegoats, but the last third, matching victim's claims against what 1922 now knew about "modern" psychiatry, is just a genius head-thump of "D'oh!!"
(Eg., the bewitched suspect claiming "the Devil climbed in his window every night to give him secret instructions", vs. the modern schizophrenic believing he's getting secret messages from Dan Rather on the news--Only a matter of "Who people talked about the most in their day".)

Still a little too German-silent-impressionist, but if you can get through the artsier scenes, there's some great Halloween deconstruction here.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...