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Barbra Streisand's "The Music, the Mem'ries, the Magic!" on Netflix 

I've been an avid fan of Streisand's since high school when I first discovered the Funny Girl movie. This is labeled as a documentary on imdb but it's really more of a live concert with a little bit of documentary & tidbits from Streisand's illustrious career. She also stated that she is writing an autobiography, which, as you can probably infer, I am looking forward to. 

Naturally, her voice has aged (as she is around 73 years old), but she's still got it. I still marvel at the fact that she's released a few albums recently:"Release Me" (2012), "Partners" (2014), "Encores" (2016). She also has another album (The Music, the Mem'ries, the Magic) that is being released this coming December 8, 2017. 

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1 hour ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Barbra Streisand's "The Music, the Mem'ries, the Magic!" on Netflix 

I've been an avid fan of Streisand's since high school when I first discovered the Funny Girl movie. This is labeled as a documentary on imdb but it's really more of a live concert with a little bit of documentary & tidbits from Streisand's illustrious career. She also stated that she is writing an autobiography, which, as you can probably infer, I am looking forward to. 

Naturally, her voice has aged (as she is around 73 years old), but she's still got it. I still marvel at the fact that she's released a few albums recently:"Release Me" (2012), "Partners" (2014), "Encores" (2016). She also has another album (The Music, the Mem'ries, the Magic) that is being released this coming December 8, 2017. 

Her only competition is herself.

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16 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Her only competition is herself.

I am an avid fan too.  Thanks so much for the info.!  I too enjoyed Funny Girl in high school days.

She still has a great voice.  Can't  believe she is 73!

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Double Door (1934).

You've got company. I had never heard of this film either but, as I soon discovered after a recent first time viewing, we've all been missing something.

This is a handsome, slightly claustrophobic Paramount adaption of a 1933 stage hit featuring Mary Morris (yeh, I know, who?) in a chilling re-play of her stage role as the domineering, manipulative head of a wealthy New York family who rules that family through fear and manipulation.

vlcsnap-4677656.png

The film has the feel of a thriller (certainly visually, with its setting in a creepy old house) without quite being that. It is really about "old money" trying to guard against intruders coming into the family. Morris's character, elderly sister Victoria, resents the fact that younger kid brother Kent Taylor is about to marry an outsider (Evelyn Venable). Soon after the marriage, through Morris's domination of her brother, keeping him largely separated from his young bride, the marriage is strained and Venable seeks advice from an old male friend on how to save the marriage. Morris's scheming Victoria, on discovery of this through a private detective, seeks to use this information to break up the marriage.

As for the "double door" of the title, right out of a few horror thrillers, it is a secret vault in their old home, used to store valuables. Nobody knows about this vault except for Victoria, of course, as well as her frightened younger sister (a young Anne Revere in a reprise of her stage role, this being her only '30s film before returning to the screen to play a lot of Moms during the '40s). But the reason that Revere's character is so constantly distraught to the point of a mental breakdown is that sister Victoria once locked her up in the air tight vault as punishment when she was a child, and threatens to do so again if she doesn't side with her against their brother's new bride.

When Morris finds that her scheming to break up the marriage is not quite working as she wishes, she is then psychotic enough to resort to other means.

The film, which runs a relatively short 75 minutes, remains emotionally involving, much of this due to the skill of Mary Morris's creepy portrayal. The actress dominates the screen in her portrait of a scheming middle aged spinster desperate that no one outside the family benefits from any of their money. This was Morris's only film venture, and that's a shame. She was only 39 when playing her role here but is made up and acts much older.

Only in the film's over-the-top final scene can Morris be accused of overacting.

It would be a lovely discovery for most TCM fans, I'm sure, if the station ever had a broadcast of Double Door. I happened to stumble across a print of it on a rather obscure Russian (I believe) website.

unspecified-1472763870-726x388.jpg

2.5 out of 4

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Last night I watched McQ on DVD, a 1970's film starring John Wayne as a police officer in modern day times. Have to admit it was weird seeing him in a movie that takes place during the modern era, after having seen him in so many westerns.

Don't know quite yet how I feel about the movie, other than his McQ seems almost like a lightweight Dirty Harry Callahan. Both he and Dirty Harry had superiors to answer to after having break the rules one too many times.

Still I have watched worst movies.....

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Stayed up late last night to watch the entirety of the 7-episode (each about an hour long) Netflix miniseries "Godless." It wasn't amazing, but I was invested enough in the story to want to complete the series. 

Brief synopsis: A widowed rancher-woman discovers an outlaw named Roy Goode on her farm after he's been shot (she ends up shooting him in the throat as well) and ends up harboring him in her barn while he helps her with breaking her 30 wild horses she received from the Natives (her ex husband was a Native, and her son is half/half). The town they all live in had a horrific mining accident in which all the men ended up dying, essentially, except for a select few (like the sheriff and his baby-faced deputy). The town is in danger of attack by this other outlaw (Jeff Daniels) who was screwed over by Roy Goode and wants to kill him. 

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The Fat Man FilmPoster.jpeg

The Fat Man (1951) P.I. crime film directed by William Castle. Based on a radio drama of the same name, with J. Scott Smart. It's sort of a rip off of Nero Wolfe but it has a nice cast.  Julie London, Rock Hudson, Jayne Meadows, John Russell, and Emmett Kelly. 6-7/10.

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In a Lonely Place, a 1950 film starring Humphrey Bogart as a screenwriter who is suspected in the murder of a young woman who he invites back to his apartment, with only his neighbor, played by Gloria Grahame, able to give him an alibi.

I was really blown away by this, because you can't tell whether or not you should trust Bogey's character any more than Grahame can.

Bogart is great in this, and this is definitely one of his most underrated gems. I had only known Grahame from Oklahoma as Ado Annie, and I was equally impressed with her performance. The ending is a stunner but appropriate. 9/10 from me.

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The Happy Road (1957)

I'd never heard of this before finding it on TCM one weekend & have seen it half a dozen times since then. I wasn't planning to view it again tonight, but I happened to catch the beginning & it tends to pull you back in.

The story is essentially Kelly's busy, business minded American learning to chill, French style - but is also something of a double buddy road movie.

I always get a kick from the comedic set pieces, the recurring gag with the 3-wheeler horn honking it's way past & Michael Redgrave's look of utter exasperation...

s-l225.jpg

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16 hours ago, TomJH said:

Double Door (1934).

You've got company. I had never heard of this film either but, as I soon discovered after a recent first time viewing, we've all been missing something.

This is a handsome, slightly claustrophobic Paramount adaption of a 1933 stage hit featuring Mary Morris (yeh, I know, who?) in a chilling re-play of her stage role as the domineering, manipulative head of a wealthy New York family who rules that family through fear and manipulation.

vlcsnap-4677656.png

The film has the feel of a thriller (certainly visually, with its setting in a creepy old house) without quite being that. It is really about "old money" trying to guard against intruders coming into the family. Morris's character, elderly sister Victoria, resents the fact that younger kid brother Kent Taylor is about to marry an outsider (Evelyn Venable). Soon after the marriage, through Morris's domination of her brother, keeping him largely separated from his young bride, the marriage is strained and Venable seeks advice from an old male friend on how to save the marriage. Morris's scheming Victoria, on discovery of this through a private detective, seeks to use this information to break up the marriage.

As for the "double door" of the title, right out of a few horror thrillers, it is a secret vault in their old home, used to store valuables. Nobody knows about this vault except for Victoria, of course, as well as her frightened younger sister (a young Anne Revere in a reprise of her stage role, this being her only '30s film before returning to the screen to play a lot of Moms during the '40s). But the reason that Revere's character is so constantly distraught to the point of a mental breakdown is that sister Victoria once locked her up in the air tight vault as punishment when she was a child, and threatens to do so again if she doesn't side with her against their brother's new bride.

When Morris finds that her scheming to break up the marriage is not quite working as she wishes, she is then psychotic enough to resort to other means.

The film, which runs a relatively short 75 minutes, remains emotionally involving, much of this due to the skill of Mary Morris's creepy portrayal. The actress dominates the screen in her portrait of a scheming middle aged spinster desperate that no one outside the family benefits from any of their money. This was Morris's only film venture, and that's a shame. She was only 39 when playing her role here but is made up and acts much older.

Only in the film's over-the-top final scene can Morris be accused of overacting.

It would be a lovely discovery for most TCM fans, I'm sure, if the station ever had a broadcast of Double Door. I happened to stumble across a print of it on a rather obscure Russian (I believe) website.

unspecified-1472763870-726x388.jpg

2.5 out of 4

 

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13 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

In a Lonely Place, a 1950 film starring Humphrey Bogart as a screenwriter who is suspected in the murder of a young woman who he invites back to his apartment, with only his neighbor, played by Gloria Grahame, able to give him an alibi.

I was really blown away by this, because you can't tell whether or not you should trust Bogey's character any more than Grahame can.

Bogart is great in this, and this is definitely one of his most underrated gems. I had only known Grahame from Oklahoma as Ado Annie, and I was equally impressed with her performance. The ending is a stunner but appropriate. 9/10 from me.

Grahame screen persona in Oklahoma is here 'out of place' one.   Grahame was featured in some fine noir films like The Big Heat,  Crossfire, Human Desire,  Macao,  Odds Against Tomorrow and Sudden Fear. 

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Currently finishing up Consolation Marriage on TCM, which I am afraid is not a very exciting  film, and this is coming from a big Irene Dunne fan....

 

Anyway though, the film before it today, 1966's heist comedy, Penelope, is a different story. It's not a perfect film (a brief sequence with Jonathan Winters as a predatory professor was not in good taste), but for the most part its a fun, jolly, charming time. And Natalie Wood got a great chance to show off her considerable comic chops; this is a great, committed comedy turn.

 

(Regarding Dark Passage, on next, I have seen that before, and found it to be quite intriguing. The first-person camera angle might be a bit distracting, but as always Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, in love onscreen and married offscreen,  illuminate the screen, in this film, their onscreen rapport is more tender than in their other three films together. Regarding Agnes Moorehead..... she has one of the most startling and memorable final scenes in the classic era.)

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22 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Bogart is great in this, and this is definitely one of his most underrated gems. I had only known Grahame from Oklahoma as Ado Annie, and I was equally impressed with her performance. 

Grahame also "starred" as Violet, the rather fast young woman who had her sights set on Jimmy Stewart's George Bailey in "It's a Wonderful Life" (1946). 

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1 hour ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Grahame also "starred" as Violet, the rather fast young woman who had her sights set on Jimmy Stewart's George Bailey in "It's a Wonderful Life" (1946). 

Think I am the only person on this planet who has never seen It's a Wonderful Life in its entirety!

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1 hour ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Think I am the only person on this planet who has never seen It's a Wonderful Life in its entirety!

You'd better be glad my grandfather isn't on this website. It is one of his favorite films of all time haha. He gave me the "It's a Wonderful Life" book, complete with behind the scenes trivia, photos, and full film script (it was published in 1986, I believe, so a full 40 years after the movie was released). 

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7 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

You'd better be glad my grandfather isn't on this website. It is one of his favorite films of all time haha. He gave me the "It's a Wonderful Life" book, complete with behind the scenes trivia, photos, and full film script (it was published in 1986, I believe, so a full 40 years after the movie was released). 

Scratch that, my folks just said they have never seen the movie either.....should we be running for the hills? LOL

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46 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Scratch that, my folks just said they have never seen the movie either.....should we be running for the hills? LOL

Oops, we can't watch all the great films!  I didn't catch this one until a few years ago.  Every year I watch certain favorite Christmas films  like The Bishop's Wife, Scrooge, etc.  Then I decided to try this one.  IT is very entertaining and heartwarming.  One of my sons has the Blue Ray and was telling me how lovely it looks. 

More importantly, I think it is time well-spent with the holidays approaching. 

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Two very different reactions to the last two films I watched.

The Set-Up (1949, on a DVD) is a gripping boxing tale with magnificent performances from Robert Ryan and Audrey Totter, an appropriately tough and gritty atmosphere, and precision on every level. Its a wonderful film, one of the best boxing films I have seen.

Tell Them Willie Boy Was Here (last night on TCM) was disappointing though. Given what I had heard, I was expecting more. The main problem is that the script was just too heavy-handed, ponderous, and dry, and that in turn leaves a void in the center of the film. In this case, parts are better than the whole, because the performances are very good (particular praise must go to Susan Clark) and the cinematography is excellent.

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Excuse me for a moment here folks, but I just wanna say that every time I scroll down in this thread and see Tom's write-up of Double Door (1934) and the following pix he submitted within it...

vlcsnap-4677656.png

...I'm somehow reminded of that one Dobie Gillis episode where Dwayne Hickman, along with Bob Denver as Maynard G. Krebs, dress in drag in order to sneak into his college's co-ed dorm.

(...okay, and now that I've got THAT off my chest, back to movies we've just watched here)

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20 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Think I am the only person on this planet who has never seen It's a Wonderful Life in its entirety!

Don't feel bad. Last year was the very first time I actually sat and watched the whole thing. And you what? I liked it.

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17 hours ago, Janet0312 said:

Don't feel bad. Last year was the very first time I actually sat and watched the whole thing. And you what? I liked it.

I was watching Johnny Carson last night and he discussed the up coming holiday season;  the common stuff like it appears to start earlier each year,  the mad shopping rush etc..     After this he said that while James Stewart was his friend he couldn't stand to see Its A Wonderful Life one more time.   He did a funny Stewart impression to close this off.

 

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22 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Scratch that, my folks just said they have never seen the movie either.....should we be running for the hills? LOL

Welll... I guess that won't be necessary. I mean, haven't even seen "Citizen Kane" or "Mildred Pierce." I know the 2 of those are fairly common. But, then again, I'm not a film student. 

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8 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Welll... I guess that won't be necessary. I mean, haven't even seen "Citizen Kane" or "Mildred Pierce." I know the 2 of those are fairly common. But, then again, I'm not a film student. 

Well that leads me to another confession.....never seen Citizen Kane once in my life either! (Though Mildred Pierce is one of my favorites).

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1 hour ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Well that leads me to another confession.....never seen Citizen Kane once in my life either! (Though Mildred Pierce is one of my favorites).

Glad to know I'm not the only one who hasn't seen Citizen Kane. I gave it a try once, but it didn't really hold my attention. 

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