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On 11/27/2017 at 10:50 PM, Bethluvsfilms said:

Scratch that, my folks just said they have never seen the movie either.....should we be running for the hills? LOL

In our day--back when IAWL was public domain, would often show on three different stations every week in all of December..at the same time--I don't think any of us ever envisioned the day when it would be only shown twice a year, and a generation would grow up saying they'd never seen it.

(And yeah, I know, harsh words coming from the guy who grew up in the real Bedford Falls--I promised everyone I wouldn't brag about it this year.  :P )

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2 hours ago, EricJ said:

In our day--back when IAWL was public domain, would often show on three different stations every week in all of December..at the same time--I don't think any of us ever envisioned the day when it would be only shown twice a year, and a generation would grow up saying they'd never seen it.

(And yeah, I know, harsh words coming from the guy who grew up in the real Bedford Falls--I promised everyone I wouldn't brag about it this year.  :P )

I would say the brouhaha over It's a Wonderful Life is rather recent. I watched all the Kansas City movie packages that they had of old movies on the three affiliates and I never saw this movie in the 50s or the early 60s.

I don't know when it became so popular maybe it was in the early 70's  with the advent of the Revival Theaters and the autobiography of Frank Capra, "Tthe Name Above The Title". I can remember the first time I saw it on television on The Late Show was in the late sixties and I was quite impressed with it, but I had never heard of it.

For my generation the Thanksgiving and/or Christmas movie was The Wizard of Oz on television.

And I can't remember when the Natalie Wood movie started coming on at Thanksgiving; or The Ten Commandments at Easter.

We also used to look forward to a NBC showing of Mary Martin's Peter Pan at Thanksgiving.

But all these films seem to predate It's a Wonderful Life and it's had a relatively short span in this sort of venue.If it's any consolation,i it seems like they sell it for a dollar or two at Walmart.

Around 1964 NBC introduced " Saturday Night at the Movies " where they TV  premiered Gene Kelly musicals like Singin' in the Rain and  An American in Paris.

That seemed funny to me's because I had been watching the Fred Astaire 1950s movies for several years on The Late Show - -

Daddy Long Legs and Silk Stockings.

I'd be curious to know how many other Boomers have memories of these holiday perennial movies.

In Kansas City on the CBS affiliate, they would show Yankee Doodle Dandy and Easter Parade the night before the holiday and the afternoon/ matinee  of the holiday. Those were the two I looked forward to every year.

Since there were no Revival theaters, no VHS, no DVD, no streaming, no nothing --unless you had your own movie reels, that's just the way it was.

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One of the truly great moments of screen acting, in my opinion.

James Stewart as George Bailey at the end of his rope, sitting on a bar stool, pleading with God, starting to quietly weep. His desperation is palpable. I don't know if Stewart's wartime experiences (about which he was always very stoic in public) played a role in the emotional anguish that he brought to this scene, but the impact of his performance here I have always found to be devastating.

He's a man staring into the abyss and he doesn't see any way out.

james+stewart+its+a+wonderful+life+6.jpg

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For anyone who has a Centurt Theatre or Cinemark Theatre in their region, they have been showing IAWL the past few years the Sunday and Wednesday before Christmas day, and are doing so this year, as well. Even the Sunday matinee is packed!

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2 minutes ago, TomJH said:

One of the truly great moments of screen acting, in my opinion.

James Stewart as George Bailey at the end of his rope, sitting on a bar stool, pleading with God, starting to quietly weep. His desperation is palpable. I don't know if Stewart's wartime experiences (about which he was always very stoic in public) played a role in the emotional anguish that he brought to this scene, but the impact of his performance here I have always found to be devastating.

james+stewart+its+a+wonderful+life+6.jpg

I've always loved the way James Stewart portrayed desperate. He takes his hand to his open mouth and starts to breathe uneasily. He does this in many films.

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11 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Welll... I guess that won't be necessary. I mean, haven't even seen "Citizen Kane" or "Mildred Pierce." I know the 2 of those are fairly common. But, then again, I'm not a film student. 

That's OK.  This isn't a classroom. ;)  Although you might notice some treat this place as their own private "film workshop".

Sepiatone

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

One of the truly great moments of screen acting, in my opinion.

James Stewart as George Bailey at the end of his rope, sitting on a bar stool, pleading with God, starting to quietly weep. His desperation is palpable. I don't know if Stewart's wartime experiences (about which he was always very stoic in public) played a role in the emotional anguish that he brought to this scene, but the impact of his performance here I have always found to be devastating.

He's a man staring into the abyss and he doesn't see any way out.

james+stewart+its+a+wonderful+life+6.jpg

When Stewart is running to the bridge at the climax, the music cue is the Latin hymn (or Gregorian chant, as some say) Dies Irae. Composer Dimitri Tiomkin used it very effectively to convey desperation and hopelessness. Most other film composers have used it to convey horror ( as in The Shining, The Mephisto Waltz, and The Return of Dracula).

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12 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Welll... I guess that won't be necessary. I mean, haven't even seen "Citizen Kane" or "Mildred Pierce." I know the 2 of those are fairly common. But, then again, I'm not a film student. 

I really like Citizen Kane.  It's a movie that I can watch multiple times and still notice something new each time.  It's not a movie I watch on a regular basis, but I sometimes catch it here and there on TCM.

I love Mildred Pierce.  It's a great film and the whole cast, especially Ann Blyth, are excellent in it.  It's got a little bit of everything in it.  I bought the Criterion release of Mildred Pierce earlier this year.

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3 hours ago, TomJH said:

One of the truly great moments of screen acting, in my opinion.

James Stewart as George Bailey at the end of his rope, sitting on a bar stool, pleading with God, starting to quietly weep. His desperation is palpable. I don't know if Stewart's wartime experiences (about which he was always very stoic in public) played a role in the emotional anguish that he brought to this scene, but the impact of his performance here I have always found to be devastating.

He's a man staring into the abyss and he doesn't see any way out.

I remember during Jimmy's 1980 AFI Life Achievement Award presentation a young Dustin Hoffman came on stage to say a few words about that year's honoree, and he said he always thought Jimmy's performance in IAWL was one of the greatest in film history.

(...and I've always thought so too)

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55 minutes ago, Dargo said:

I remember during Jimmy's 1980 AFI Life Achievement Award presentation a young Dustin Hoffman came on stage to say a few words about that year's honoree, and he said he always thought Jimmy's performance in IAWL was one of the greatest in film history.

(...and I've always thought so too)

I believe Richard Dreyfuss has repeated those sentiments about Jimmy and IAWL. I've always thought so too.

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Two For the Road.  I watched this movie on Sunday.  I kept recording this movie and something kept happening to the recording.  The satellite would go out in the middle, or I *thought* I had recorded it and didn't, and this last time, I *did* remember to record it, but then my DVR hard drive crashed and I lost everything.  Anyway, third time is a charm as far as this film goes. 

I really liked Two For the Road.  This film tells the story of a married couple, played by Albert Finney and Audrey Hepburn, who have been married for a decade and are experiencing a rough patch in their marriage.  The events of their ten-year marriage unfold through a series of non-linear flashbacks and present day scenes.  I felt that the non-linear storytelling format was perfect for this film.  A longtime marriage is a relationship that evolves over the course of time.  A couple who has been together forever will have experienced happy times, trying times, sad times, etc. 

In Two For the Road, we see Finney and Hepburn meet in the 1950s when Hepburn was traveling with the choir.  We see them fall in love.  Later, we see the happy couple on their honeymoon.  Then we see the couple bickering about children and infidelity.  During the more blissful days of their relationship, Finney and Hepburn have modest means.  The present day scenes show Finney as a successful architect and he and Hepburn are living the high life.  However, Hepburn is very distant and cold to her husband.  With money, the couple is unhappy.  In one of the present day scenes, Hepburn and Finney are lounging on a beach and conversing very tersely with one another. This scene is juxtaposed with a flashback sequence showing the couple on the same beach but having fun--a very different experience than what they're having now.  There are quite a few scenes that show Finney and Hepburn returning to old haunts only to have a completely different experience than they had prior.  For some people, these old rendezvous spots may elicit some type of nostalgic feeling, albeit a happy or bittersweet feeling.  In Two For the Road, I get the sense that the flashback sequences are all looking back on a relationship with a feeling of sadness.

How did a couple who used to be so much in love, grow apart from one another? This happens in long term relationships every day.  Couples who have been married 10, 20 years are suddenly divorcing.  Some stay in unhappy unions because of children, others for financial security.  In Two For the Road, I get the sense that both Finney and Hepburn are unhappy because they don't feel that passion that they used to have and their relationship has become very routine.  No longer are they spending the night randomly in concrete construction pipes or frolicking on the French Riviera countryside.  Now Finney has a career.  Finney and Hepburn are parents to a little girl.  From the present day scenes in the film, I get the sense that both parties are bored with one another and are looking for something to spice up the relationship.

As an aside, I loved Hepburn's costumes in this film.  Her present day, 1967 wardrobe was especially fun and I loved her giant sunglasses.  They'd look awful on me, but Hepburn has that right flair that makes them great.  Hepburn wore a variety of hairstyles in this film, which aided in informing the viewer which era of Finney and Hepburn's relationship they are viewing.  In the early days of the relationship (mid-1950s), Hepburn wears her hair in a very prim fashion, a bob with bangs and a headband.  Later, before she and Finney have their daughter, she has her hair long and straight.  When their daughter arrives, Hepburn's hair is a short bob.  Later, in the present day, she sports a very chic, very hip, short hairstyle. 

I really enjoyed Two For a Road for it's realistic look at a couple who have experienced many ups and downs in their ten year union. 

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5 hours ago, TomJH said:

One of the truly great moments of screen acting, in my opinion.

James Stewart as George Bailey at the end of his rope, sitting on a bar stool, pleading with God, starting to quietly weep. His desperation is palpable. I don't know if Stewart's wartime experiences (about which he was always very stoic in public) played a role in the emotional anguish that he brought to this scene, but the impact of his performance here I have always found to be devastating.

He's a man staring into the abyss and he doesn't see any way out.

 

Yes, Stewart is great in that scene but overall the film is too much Capracorn for my taste.   This is why I was surprised by Johnny Carson's comments about the film, as well as his facial expression like he ate something rotten, when he said he couldn't stand to see the film again, despite being a friend of Stewart). 

But Carson's entire holiday related monologue was rather cynical: as in 'aren't we all really hoping this just comes and goes rather quickly').      It made me wonder if he received any negative feedback (say letters), from viewers. 

   

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12 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

I would say the brouhaha over It's a Wonderful Life is rather recent. I watched all the Kansas City movie packages that they had of old movies on the three affiliates and I never saw this movie in the 50s or the early 60s.

I don't know when it became so popular maybe it was in the early 70's  with the advent of the Revival Theaters and the autobiography of Frank Capra, "Tthe Name Above The Title".

Since there were no Revival theaters, no VHS, no DVD, no streaming, no nothing --unless you had your own movie reels, that's just the way it was.

It IS recent--Organized programming on PBS stations didn't really start until the mid-80's, but back in the 70's, your local PBS station in the wilderness showed whatever was traveling the ether.  With smaller stations, that included a lot of either cheap Britcom imports, or the occasional public-domain airing of silent movies and "Meet John Doe" or "Angel on My Shoulder".

Like Alastair Sim's Scrooge, IAWL was public-domain and holiday-themed, and was a struggling-PBS favorite in the late 70's--Until the broadcast/cable explosion in the 80's, with more channels struggling to dig up cheap public-domain excuses, and then, infamously, EVERY station was showing it, ALL month.  Cliche'd jokes about how "inescapable" IAWL was on December TV became a comedy staple through the entire 80's (inspiring more than one SNL sketch), the movie became one of those pop-cult TV-memorized scripts like Wizard of Oz or A Christmas Story, and when Republic tried asserting some music-ownership rights to buy back the movie again out of public-domain, it was hailed as just shutting it up, already.  Now, as a licensed movie for Paramount, it can enjoy the blessings of corporate greed, and only be shown once or twice a year for network ratings, and people can grow up saying "I've never seen it!"

I remember never having HEARD of the movie in the late 70's when Marlo Thomas did her Mary Bailey TV-movie remake.  And that one was back when only public-domain movies were cheap enough to license for TV-movie remakes--Yep, they did one for "Angel on My Shoulder", too.

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Dark Hazard (1934) - Interesting, although not wholly successful, character study from First National and director Alfred E. Green. Edward G. Robinson stars as Jim "Buck" Turner, a sometime professional gambler with big winning and big losing streaks. After his latest loss, he moves into a boarding house where he meets nice girl Marge (Genevieve Tobin), who helps get him back on track. But others in his life keep trying to drag him back into the shady gambling world, and he starts working for a dog track, where he runs into old flame Val (Glenda Farrell). As Buck struggles between what's right and what feels good, he becomes obsessed with owning a black racing dog named Dark Hazard who seems to have the same good/bad luck as Buck. Also featuring Sidney Toler, Hobart Cavanaugh, Robert Barrat, Gordon Westcott, George Meeker, Emma Dunn, and Wiliam V. Mong.

I kept expecting Robinson to slip into tough guy gangster mode, and while he does give one fella a knuckle sandwich, for the most part he's rather pitiful here as a man at the mercy of his impulses. Tobin and Farrell inhabit their roles well enough. The story seems a bit incohesive, and seeing as Henry B. Walthall appears in the credits but is never actually seen in the movie, some amount of last minute editing must have transpired, which may explain the lack of narrative rhythm. Still, this is a different kind of role for Robinson at this time in his career, and an admirable, if ultimately flawed attempt at making a psychologically complex portrait of a loser.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

dark-hazard-movie-poster-9999-1020701348

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On ‎5‎/‎22‎/‎2015 at 10:13 AM, AndyM108 said:

I just watched Nadine, with Kim Basinger, Jeff Bridges and Rip Torn.  I'd recorded it a few nights ago and was catching up.  It centers on an about-to-be divorced couple (Basinger and Bridges) in the Austin of 1954,  who get thrown back together when Basinger accidentally comes into possession of the state's secret  plans for a new highway.  Bridges steals the plans from her and figures on using the information to get rich, until the arch-hustler criminal Torn gets other ideas.  It's a classic mix of romantic comedy and caper movie, with a pair of thugs working for Torn who might be straight out of Home Alone.  It's not as if the plot is all that thrilling, and in truth if it had been shot in black and white and were 50 years older, it wouldn't stand out from some of Jimmy Cagney's potboilers from the 30's.  But the three main actors are all terrific (especially Basinger), and we even get a brief cameo appearance by George Costanza's father (Jerry Stiller), who winds up in a way that George Costanza might have dreamed about.

 

 

Always enjoyed this movie since I was in my teens', Basinger and Bridges definitely clicked together, Torn made a wonderfully wicked villain, and I really enjoyed the film's soundtrack as well.

My only question is will Nadine and her hubby be able to live happily ever after? He's still broke and in debt, still in danger of losing his bar and it seems to me the two of them might end up having to live on her income as a hairdresser for a long time. That is bound to cause some more problems between them.

Sorry, I am overthinking here.

It is weird seeing Jerry Stiller in here and not think of the man whose son was the self-centered, insecured George Costanza in Seinfeld.

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David Harum (1934) - More homespun comedy from Will Rogers, Fox, and director James Cruze, based on the novel by Edward Westcott. Rogers stars as David Harum, a small town banker in the 1890's. His unconventional ways and folksy wisdom endear him to some, but rankle others, like church Deacon Perkins (Charles Middleton), with whom he gets into a back-and-forth horse-trading contest. Harum's newest bank employee John (Kent Taylor) falls for local beauty Ann (Evelyn Venable), a union that the banker tries to facilitate from behind the scenes. Also featuring Louise Dresser, Stepin Fetchit, Noah Beery Sr., Roger Imhof, Frank Melton, Jane Darwell, and Sarah Padden.

The source novel was a big hit, but for dubious reasons; many businessmen liked the excuses made by the lead character for morally questionable business practices ("stick to him before he sticks it you"), excuses that they themselves started implementing in the real world. The novel's success led to a stage adaptation and a film in 1915. This 1934 version proved to be one of Fox's biggest hits, and a radio show adaptation started in 1936 ran for 15 years. This film is like many of Rogers' others from the period, such as Doctor Bull and Judge Priest, with Will acting as a benevolent, down-home philosopher and sometime romantic matchmaker for his younger co-stars. Stepin Fetchit, a frequent Rogers co-star, appears once again, this time even more incomprehensible than usual. Dresser, as Rogers' sister, doesn't get a lot to do. One notable aspect of this film is the depiction of harness racing, which rarely appears in cinema. This movie is mostly agreeable fluff, easily digested and quickly forgotten.  (6/10)

Source: Fox DVD. The print is rather poor for a major company DVD release. The bonus features include the trailer and a short interview with Jane Withers about Rogers.

11729625.jpg 

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Don't Drink the Water--no, not the Jackie Gleason 69 version, the 1994 Woody Allen version--I never knew before it even existed.  Evidently, Allen didn't like the original film of his script, so decided to star himself for a tv remake.  It's the same story, but with a completely different look and 'feel'.  Instead of an embassy in the middle of nowhere, this is more realistic--lots of people work there, and it is elegantly furnished.  Allen is his usual franatic self, sometimes overshadowing every other character.  Michael J. Fox seems a bit mis-cast as the loser son of a diplomat in charge, and there isn't enough for Julie Kavner, as Allen's wife, to do..but Dom DeLuise expands on the magician/monk role.  It's really more of a filmed play, as all the action takes place in the embassy (no final chase scenes, no hotel scenes).  This version is sillier, quicker than the original..I actually like them both, but this one will appeal more to Allen fans.  I'd be interested in hearing from anyone else who's seen both how they would compare the two versions.

Source: Terrarium apk(some good new providers in the updated version..finding all sorts of interesting things to stream)

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Drums o' Voodoo (1934) - aka She Devil aka Louisiana. Cheap, ridiculous morality play from Sack Amusement Enterprises and director Arthur Hoerl. Scheming no-good juke joint operator Tom Catt (Morris McKenny) tries to drag everyone he meets into a his orbit of wild parties and sinful living. He's blackmailing local preacher Elder Berry (Augustus Smith), and he's chasing after good girl Myrtle (Edna Barr). The townsfolk turn to Auntie Hagar (Laura Bowman), an old voodoo priestess, to work her hoodoo on Tom Catt.

This all-black feature started out as a play, and the stage roots are evident from the limited locations and stagey production design. The performances range from awful to really awful, while top-billed Bowman, a noted singer and stage actress in her day, really lays it on thick as the voodoo priestess, often shouting out, "Let me hear dem drums!" Her small cabal of worshipers consist mainly of guys dancing around in their tighty-whiteys. The print I watched was in terrible condition, and ran a scant 49 minutes, while I've read that some run 70+, and I've allowed for some loss in quality due to over-judicious editing. Still, I find it unlikely any more footage could have saved this turkey from being anything but a cultural relic.   (3/10)

Source: YouTube.

Drums+O%2527+Voodoo+%25281934%252C+a.k.a

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Devil With A Blue Dress (1994) Soul Noir in the City Of Angels

Devil_in_a_blue_dress%2BPoster.jpg

Walter Mosley has written fourteen Ezekiel (Easy) Rawlins mysteries to date. I've read about ten of them. Easy Rawlins was contemporary with Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe, and Ross MacDonald's Lew Archer, and Devil With A Blue Dress was Mosley's first novel in the series, and believe it or not, one of the ones I haven't gotten to yet. I suppose it was seeing this film fifteen or so years ago that got me reading the rest of series and I just never got around to picking up number one.

It's a crying shame that director and screenwriter, Carl Franklin and star Denzel Washington didn't team up for more of the Easy Rawlins novels, they are quite good, and also quite unique in that Easy ages through time and local historical events as the series progresses, so it's not as if it's too late for another one. White Butterfly from 1992 was a particularly good standout.

The excellent cinematography was by Tak Fujimoto (The Silence of the Lambs (1991)), the music was by Elmer Bernstein, with a soundtrack with a lot of soul, that includes performances by T-Bone Walker, Jimmy Witherspoon, Duke Ellington, Roy Milton, Brian O'Neal, Pee Wee Crayton, Joan Shaw, Lucienne Boyer, Bull Moose Jackson, Kay Kyser, Thelonious Monk, Amos Milburn, James Cleveland & The Angelic Choir, Memphis Slim and Night Train International.

Enjoy the film, it can take it's place along with Chinatown, Farewell My Lovely, Hammett, Union City, Angel Heart, A Rage In Harlem, The Public Eye, Mulholland Falls, L.A. Confidential, This World, Then The Fireworks, The Man Who Wasn’t There, The Black Dahlia, Honeydripper, and The Killer Inside Me.  Screencaps are from the  TriStar DVD 9/10.

Full review with screencaps here in Film Noir/Gangster and also in Noirsville

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4 hours ago, shutoo said:

Don't Drink the Water--no, not the Jackie Gleason 69 version, the 1994 Woody Allen version--I never knew before it even existed.  Evidently, Allen didn't like the original film of his script, so decided to star himself for a tv remake. 

This was around the time of "Manhattan Murder Mystery" and "Husbands & Wives", when Woody's latest artistic obsession had moved on from Bergman and Fellini plaigiarisms, to "Shaky handheld-camera cinema-verite' for realism".  Oh, lord, thank goodness that didn't last long.

The urge to get back into plays also produced a Neil Simon '96 TV remake of "The Sunshine Boys", with Woody as George Burns and Peter Falk as Walter Matthau, but I haven't been able to track that one down yet.

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Evelyn Prentice (1934) - Decent drama from MGM and director William K. Howard that marked the third teaming of Myrna Loy and William Powell. Powell is John Prentice, a successful workaholic defense attorney who provides well for his wife Evelyn (Loy) and young daughter Dorothy (Cora Sue Collins), but he's never home to share it with them. When Evelyn thinks that John is having an affair, she flirts with having one of her own with charming cad Lawrence (Harvey Stephens). This leads to even more trouble and heartache. Also featuring Una Merkel as Loy's best friend, Edward Brophy, Isabel Jewell, Henry Wadsworth, Frank Conroy, Jessie Ralph, Herman Bing, Billy Gilbert, Samuel S. Hinds, Jack Mulhall, and Rosalind Russell in her film debut.

Loy is very good in this as the emotionally conflicted Evelyn who gets in over her head. Powell underplays the big finale courtroom scenes well. Russell is okay as a client of Powell's who's a little too grateful for his services. Her role could have been expanded, though. The presence of Merkel is always a plus in my book. Of the 3 films with Loy/Powell in 1934, the others being Manhattan Melodrama and The Thin Man, this is the least impressive, but it's still worth a look.  (7/10)

Source: Warners DVD, part of the Myrna Loy and William Powell Collection. Bonus features include the usual comedy and cartoon shorts.

410full-evelyn-prentice-.jpg

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There Was a Crooked Man (1970), a western that stars Kirk Douglas as a robber who ends up in the pokey and manipulates the other inmates (at their own expense) to find a way to ensure him a way to escape the prison. Henry Fonda is the prison warden who is interested in reform and rehabilitation but finds Douglas' character may be a hopeless case.

Interesting movie, and I think the only flick that Douglas and Fonda ever did together. Cool supporting cast too, with Hume Cronyn, Warren Oates and John Randolph.

(SPOILER ALERT) The ending was kind of unexpected. After Douglas dies from the snake bite he gets when he tries to uncover his money in the hole he hid it in, Fonda finds him and puts his body on the horse and sends both back into the prison.....then turns around with the dough and heads to Mexico with the cash. Guess Fonda's character figured he didn't want to deal with any more inmates like Douglas (charming but manipulative and two-faced), and figured he'd take an early 'retirement'.

 

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Summertime (1955)  

I've been wanting to see this film forever.  I'm a big fan of Katharine Hepburn and had seen this film listed on her filmography.  I've never seen this film scheduled on TCM.  After researching the film a little bit, and discovering that it was directed by David Lean, I was even more interested in seeing it.  I'm a big fan of Lean's Brief Encounter, and the synopsis of Summertime sounded like it was along the same vein as Brief Encounter.  After quite a wait on the library wait list (apparently a lot of other people wanted to see this film too.  I also had no renewals, there were three holds on it when I returned it this morning), I finally got a chance to watch it.  

I loved this movie.  It starred Hepburn as a single middle aged secretary from Ohio who takes the trip of a lifetime and travels to Venice.  Hepburn's character seems happily single and enjoys her solitude and independence.  Most of the action in the film takes place at Hepburn's hotel and in and around Venice.  Lean shot the film on location and the scenery is gorgeous.  We see Hepburn taking in the sights of town, the canals, the gondolas, local restaurants, etc.  While sight seeing, she meets Rossano Brazzi, a local proprietor of an antique shop.  Brazzi is super cute and Hepburn finds herself attracted to him. While purchasing a red glass antique goblet, she has a bit of a flirtatious conversation with Brazzi as he tries to school her on the art of haggling.  

Brazzi also takes an immediate liking to Hepburn and is soon itching for a date.  Hepburn's character, who is so used to being on her own, is hesitant at first, but Brazzi wins her over and soon they're in a red hot romance.  Brazzi and Hepburn wine and dine at the finest restaurants, go dancing and even travel together to a neighboring island.  Their relationship gets pretty hot and heavy and Hepburn finds herself conflicted--does she take the relationship to the next level, even though it may not be anything more than a summer fling? Or does she cherish what she had in Venice but return to her single life in Ohio?

This was such a great movie and Hepburn and Brazzi's relationship evolved organically.  It didn't seem forced.  Hepburn had a great wardrobe in this film and even wears a strapless gown! I don't think I've ever seen Hepburn's shoulders before.  There is a scene where she falls into one of the Venice canals.  Apparently, she got an eye infection from this stunt (I'm sure the waters of Venice are not clean) and it never cleared up.  The little boy she befriends in this film reminds me of the little boy that Lucy befriends in I Love Lucy episode "Lucy Gets Homesick in Italy."  Lucy and the Mertzes meet a little boy named Giuseppe who seemingly doesn't have any parents.  He manages to score candy and presents from Lucy by telling her, "she's-a my birthday today too!" The little boy in Summertime, who is seemingly homeless and an orphan, manages to score treats and cigarettes from Hepburn.  

I loved this movie and the scenes of 1955 Venice were gorgeous.  Today is the last day of Barnes and Noble's 50% Criterion sale, so I had to purchase myself a copy of this film :-) 

If you're in the mood for a legitimate romantic film, this is the film to watch.  It'd make a great double feature with Brief Encounter

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47 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Summertime (1955)  

I loved this movie and the scenes of 1955 Venice were gorgeous.  Today is the last day of Barnes and Noble's 50% Criterion sale, so I had to purchase myself a copy of this film :-) 

 

This was one of the first Kate Hepburn films I ever saw. Right after I watched "Bringing up Baby" (1938) approximately 3 times in a row ("Baby" is easily one of my favorite films of all time). I enjoyed "Summertime." I heard that Kate wanted to do all her own stunts because none of the stuntwomen stood up straight enough. 

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