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5 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

This was one of the first Kate Hepburn films I ever saw. Right after I watched "Bringing up Baby" (1938) approximately 3 times in a row ("Baby" is easily one of my favorite films of all time). I enjoyed "Summertime." I heard that Kate wanted to do all her own stunts because none of the stuntwomen stood up straight enough. 

Lol about Katharine doing her own stunts.  Apparently, David Lean was unhappy with the actress playing the widow's performance.  She was supposed to cry and she couldn't muster up realistic tears.  Katharine Hepburn took her aside, slapped her across the face and the actress started crying because she was so startled.  Lean told Hepburn that she was a tougher director than he was.

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Evergreen (1934) - British musical comedy from Gaumont and director Victor Saville, based on a hit stage production. Jessie Matthews stars as Harriet Green, a celebrated stage singer and dancer on the verge of retiring from the stage in order to marry into royalty. Her hopes are dashed when her no-good ex shows up and threatens Harriet with scandal, so the songstress quickly leaves town for good. Many years later, her grown daughter, also named Harriet (and also played by Matthews) arrives in London looking for stage work. A desperate producer (Sonnie Hale) and a fast-talking publicity man (Barry MacKay) come up with a plan to present the young Harriet as her mother, returned from self-imposed exile and looking remarkably young, ready for a return to the stage. Their masquerade is a big hit, but how long can it last? Also featuring Betty Balfour, Ivor McLaren, Hartley Power, Patrick Ludlow, Betty Shale, and Marjorie Brooks.

I wasn't too familiar with Matthews before this, but she was a major star in Britain during the 1930's and 40's. She grew on me as the film went on, and she's certainly a skilled singer and dancer. The situations are rather routine and the humor obvious, but it's not bad. The musical numbers have a Busby-Berkeley-esque quality, with the standout bit coming at the film's midpoint: a bizarre science fiction inspired bit with dancers in "futuristic" clothing dancing like robots in a giant factory. The description for this movie on the FilmStruck website called it "the best British musical ever made." That may be the case, but I thought it was pretty good while nothing I'd go out of my way to recommend. Fans of the genre may feel otherwise.   (7/10)

Source: FilmStruck.

74725f9cfb31582fd16c351924a8592c--jessie

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3 hours ago, EricJ said:

This was around the time of "Manhattan Murder Mystery" and "Husbands & Wives", when Woody's latest artistic obsession had moved on from Bergman and Fellini plaigiarisms, to "Shaky handheld-camera cinema-verite' for realism".  Oh, lord, thank goodness that didn't last long.

The urge to get back into plays also produced a Neil Simon '96 TV remake of "The Sunshine Boys", with Woody as George Burns and Peter Falk as Walter Matthau, but I haven't been able to track that one down yet.

Eric--funny you should mention that Sunshine Boys remake--I found it on a Terrarium search streamed by a sourced called FMovies, put it on my favorites list to watch this week, but today, that source is evidently down (they use over 50 sources, and servers are up and down, I guess) but I'm going to check daily to catch it.  

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5 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Summertime (1955)  

I've been wanting to see this film forever.  I'm a big fan of Katharine Hepburn and had seen this film listed on her filmography.  I've never seen this film scheduled on TCM. .....

....I loved this movie and the scenes of 1955 Venice were gorgeous.  

That was a nice write-up of Summertime, speedy.

Now, the reason I've pulled the above two lines of yours from it was to tell you that, yes, this David Lean film has been shown on TCM before in the past, and there's a reason I know this.

My wife and I first visited Venice in the mid-'90s and found it as magical a place as Lean's movie depicted it. Furthermore, and the reason I know this for a fact--that is TCM's showing of it--was that just a short while after our return from there, I remember watching this movie on TCM and recognizing so many of the specific places in that city that Hepburn and Brazzi are shown wandering past. And, it was as if being transported back and enjoying our wonderful stay there, all over again. 

And remember now, this was four decades after this movie was made, and in those four decades since, there were no discernible differences to be seen in the Venice of 1955 and from those when we were there. Yep, it was still as romantic and "magical" as ever.

(...and so, IF the opportunity ever presents itself for you and your husband to travel to Europe, I heartily recommend one of your stops be in this city...there's really no other place like it on this earth)

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41 minutes ago, Dargo said:

That was a nice write-up of Summertime, speedy.

Now, the reason I've pulled the above two lines of yours from it was to tell you that, yes, this David Lean film has been shown on TCM before in the past, and there's a reason I know this.

My wife and I first visited Venice in the mid-'90s and found it as magical a place as Lean's movie depicted it. Furthermore, and the reason I know this for a fact--that is TCM's showing of it--was that just a short while after our return from there, I remember watching this movie on TCM and recognizing so many of the specific places in that city that Hepburn and Brazzi are shown wandering past. And, it was as if being transported back and enjoying our wonderful stay there, all over again. 

And remember now, this was four decades after this movie was made, and in those four decades since, there were no discernible differences to be seen in the Venice of 1955 and from those when we were there. Yep, it was still as romantic and "magical" as ever.

(...and so, IF the opportunity ever presents itself for you and your husband to travel to Europe, I heartily recommend one of your stops be in this city...there's really no other place like it on this earth)

I loved all of Katherine Hepburn's films too and love the beautiful locales in Summertime.   I am also a big fan of Rossano Brazzi and collect his films as well. 

Thanks so much for your kindness.  Sadly, my hubby retired a little early so we could travel to Europe.  Italy was in our plans.  I had a childhood ailment, Scoliosis, that caused my spine to collapse in the last 5 years.  After 3 surgeries, I have not regained posture.  I am home a lot and watch many films.  I am lucky to have my hubby helping me go to doctor and Physical Therapy, but I wish it had been a different prognosis so we could travel.  Two of our children live at home and our daughter will watch TCM with me now and then. but they are busy in their jobs as well. 

Yes, Katherine's films were all very special.

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On 11/29/2017 at 9:37 AM, Dargo said:

I remember during Jimmy's 1980 AFI Life Achievement Award presentation a young Dustin Hoffman came on stage to say a few words about that year's honoree, and he said he always thought Jimmy's performance in IAWL was one of the greatest in film history.

(...and I've always thought so too)

Why did you refer to this Dustin Hoffman as "a young Dustin Hoffman" (I had found it to had been unnecessary)?

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2 hours ago, Mario500 said:

Why did you refer to this Dustin Hoffman as "a young Dustin Hoffman" (I had found it to had been unnecessary)?

Yeah, I suppose you have a point there, Mario.

I probably called him "young" there because in 1980 Dustin was "only" 43 years old, and thus at that time was a heck of a lot younger than the honoree Jimmy was, and thus I suppose I didn't consider him a true contemporary of Stewart's, but perhaps also called Hoffman that because, well, because...

(...okay, lets put it this way...being 65 years old presently, I pretty much consider ANYBODY in their forties to still be a "kid", IF ya know what I mean!) ;)

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5 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

High and Dry (1954) Ealing comedy with Paul Douglas, entertaining. 7/10.

I went from watching the NBA to viewing this film.   This is one of those films designed to make a viewer (unless their Scottish) feel the same frustration as the Douglas character.  Well it worked;  I just wanted to punch everyone one of those yokels,  even the kid,  and it just wasn't an enjoyable experience. 

 

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33 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I went from watching the NBA to viewing this film.   This is one of those films designed to make a viewer (unless their Scottish) feel the same frustration as the Douglas character.  Well it worked;  I just wanted to punch everyone one of those yokels,  even the kid,  and it just wasn't an enjoyable experience. 

 

So, did the Lakers lose AGAIN last night, James???

Maybe THAT'S the reason you weren't in the proper frame of mind to watch that flick once you tuned into it, dude! ;)

LOL

(...btw...I only caught the tail end of that movie last night--was watching that Redskins/Cowboys game instead-- but just from what I saw of it, it looked pretty "cute" to me, anyway...I then went the film's Wiki page synopsis to see what I had missed...hope they show it again...Paul Douglas seemed perfectly cast in the thing...and which reminds me, I STILL say he would've been all wrong for the Sheldrake role in The Apartment)

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11 minutes ago, Dargo said:

So, did the Lakers lose AGAIN last night, James???

Maybe THAT'S the reason you weren't in the proper frame of mind to watch that flick once you tuned into it, dude! ;)

LOL

(...btw...I only caught the tail end of that movie last night--was watching that Redskins/Cowboy game instead-- but just from what I say of it, it looked pretty "cute" to me, anyway...I then went the film's Wiki page synopsis to see what I had missed...hope they show it again...Paul Douglas seemed perfectly cast in the thing)

I guess it is just a matter of taste;  Yea,  one is supposed to find the antics of the locals cute,  and laugh at the cultural differences between them and Douglas, an American executive,  and at the start they are cute, but to me the 'joke' goes on too long.  I.e. the entire film is based on this one joke and it wears thin.  Unlike Douglas who forgives them at the end,  I still wanted to punch their bloody face.   (but yea, Douglas was perfectly cast).

 

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Fog Over Frisco (1934) - Entertaining crime/mystery from First National and director William Dieterle. Bette Davis is Arlene Bradford, a rich party girl who has a reputation for causing trouble. She's in league with crooked nightclub owner Jake Bello (Irving Pichel) to help launder stolen securities through her father's firm. When her dubious activities catch up to her, it falls to Arlene's half-sister Val (Margaret Lindsay) and reporter Tony (Donald Woods) to discover what happened. Also featuring Hugh Herbert, Lyle Talbot, Robert Barrat, Douglass Dumbrille, Alan Hale, William Demarest, Arthur Byron, Henry O'Neill, Gordon Westcott, Charles Wilson, Harold Minjir, and Asta.

Davis has only a small, if integral, role, but she gained top-billing after her success in Of Human Bondage vaulted her to the A-list. I liked Lindsay and Woods, two performers who can fall flat on screen occasionally. The great supporting cast is enjoyable, although a little Hugh Herbert goes a long way. I also liked the location photography, what there is of it, which isn't a lot.  (7/10)

Source: TCM.

FogOverFriscoPoster.jpg

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5 hours ago, Mario500 said:

Why did you refer to this Dustin Hoffman as "a young Dustin Hoffman" (I had found it to had been unnecessary)?

Well, when somebody says "young Dustin Hoffman", I tend to think of the 60's/70's Dustin Hoffman from Midnight Cowboy, The Graduate and Marathon Man, back when all his characters were NY losers who talked like Adam Sandler.  :P

Not the 80's one from Tootsie, Rain Man and Dick Tracy, of course.

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Gift of Gab (1934) - Lackluster radio-themed musical comedy from Universal and director Karl Freund. Edmund Lowe stars as Phillip "Gift of Gab" Gabney, a fast-talking huckster who teams up with radio writer Barbara Kelton (Gloria Stuart) to revamp a failing radio show. This provides the excuse for several musical performances from the likes of Ethel Waters, Ruth Etting, and The Downey Sisters, among others, as well as a couple of comedy sketches. The cast also includes Victor Moore, Phil Baker, Alice White, Hugh O'Connell, Sterling Holloway, Henry Armetta, Paul Lukas, Chester Morris, Robert Pryor, Billy Barty, Bela Lugosi, and Boris Karloff.

The songs are unmemorable, although it was nice seeing Waters perform, and the comedy is unfunny. One of the two bits was originally written for the Three Stooges, but they signed an exclusive contract with another studio and couldn't appear. Instead of rewriting the sketch, Universal just hired some other actors and called them Stooges. I watched this for Lugosi and Karloff, but they only have very short cameos. Stuart tries her hardest, but the script is too bland, and Lowe is a very uninteresting leading man in my opinion.   (5/10)

Source: YouTube. The print is terrible, with the audio dropping out for a second every minute or so.

gift-of-gab-photoplay-magazine-october-1

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The Goddess (1934) - Chinese tearjerker from the Shanghai Film Studios and writer-director Yonggang Wu. Lingyu Ruan stars as an unnamed prostitute who works the streets to provide for her infant son. She has the misfortune of being noticed by Zhang (Zhang Zhizhi), a loutish street thug who tells her that he's now her pimp, or else. After a few years pass, she decides to enroll her son in school to help give him a better life, but societal prejudices rear their ugly heads. Also featuring Keng Li as her son, and Tian Jian.

This resembles several of the "suffering mother" weepies coming out of Japan at the time, but this shows less cinematic skill. It's not badly made, just very primitive, although there are a few well-lit shots. The central performance by Lingyu Ruan is very good. I've seen very few Chinese films from this era (this was only the second or third), so I appreciate furthering my exposure to them. This is one of the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die. By the way, the title refers to a slang Chinese term for a streetwalker.    (7/10)

Source: TCM by way of YouTube.

kX01prLBMoyzzEk3COhxm99cCuJ.jpg

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8 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Gift of Gab (1934) - Lackluster radio-themed musical comedy from Universal and director Karl Freund. Edmund Lowe stars as Phillip "Gift of Gab" Gabney, a fast-talking huckster who teams up with radio writer Barbara Kelton (Gloria Stuart) to revamp a failing radio show...

...Stuart tries her hardest, but the script is too bland, and Lowe is a very uninteresting leading man in my opinion.   (5/10)

 

Well Lawrence. Wasn't it Edmund Lowe who once famously said: "Dying is easy. Comedy is hard" ?

Oh...wait. That was Edmund KEAN, not Edmund Lowe, huh.

(...ya know, I always DID get those two Edmunds mixed-up somehow)

;)

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7 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Well Lawrence. Wasn't it Edmund Lowe who once famously said: "Dying is easy. Comedy is hard" ?

Oh wait. That was Edmund KEAN, not Edmund Lowe, huh.

(...ya know, I always DID get those two Edmunds mixed-up somehow)

;)

Well ho ho ho and Merry Christmas.

I didn't realize there were so many Edmonds in the movies.

It was my favorite one, Kris Kringle, AKA Edmund Gwenn ,who said on his deathbed that:

" Dying is easy;  Comedy is hard. "

However, Edmund Lowe was a very interesting actor with a very interesting personal life. He's well known for playing the sympathetic doctor in Dinner at Eight.

 

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30 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Well ho ho ho and Merry Christmas.

I didn't realize there were so many Edmonds in the movies.

It was my favorite one, Kris Kringle, AKA Edmund Gwenn ,who said upon his death that:

" Dying is easy;  Comedy is hard. "

However, Edmund Lowe was a very interesting actor with a very interesting personal life. He's well known for playing the sympathetic doctor in Dinner at Eight.

 

Actually Princess, I believe British Shakespearean stage actor and considered the best in his day, Edmund Kean (1887-1833) has been recognized to have been the first to have coined that line upon his deathbed.

However, I understand Edmund Gwenn has also been attributed the line.

And my guess is that over these many years, and because both gentlemen shared a common given name, Gwenn might have been given credit for it, and even though he might have also said it as he died.

(...now, Edmund LOWE I believe is famous for saying upon HIS deathbed something like, "I KNEW I shouldn't have eaten those raw oysters in a month spelled without the letter 'r' in it!")

;)

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Just now, Dargo said:

Actually Princess, I believe British Shakespearean stage actor and considered the best in his day, Edmund Kean (1887-1833) has been recognized to have been the first to have coined that line upon his deathbed.

However, I understand Edmund Gwenn has also been attributed the line.

And my guess is that over these many years, and because both gentlemen shared a common given name, Gwenn might have been given credit for it, and even though he might have also said it as he died.

(...now, edmund LOWE I believe is famous for saying upon HIS deathbed something like, "I KNEW I shouldn't have eaten those raw oysters in a month spelled without an 'r'!")

;)

You have to forgive me because I play the quizzes on the game side and our answers are always an artist from the Golden Era of Hollywood.

Since you know so much about movies, I don't know why you don't play with us. We'd be honored to have you-- maybe you could even start a Marx Bros thread.

We've had a bit of a slow down in activity due to natural attrition. Someone of your knowledge would be most appreciated.

We particularly would enjoy your participation on the musical quizzes. Think about it?

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Thanks, Princess.

I used to occasionally dabble in that forum. I remember especially enjoying one thread that was in a "What's My Line" format.

Who knows. Maybe you'll see me over there again soon, as I've recently seemed to have lost in interest in participating in a certain other forum around here.

(...YOU know, that one which seems dominated about either talk of a certain inarticulate fat-butted politico man-child OR about talk of how men "should go their own way"!) LOL

;)

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5 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Thanks, Princess.

I used to occasionally dabble in that forum. I remember especially enjoying one thread that was in a "What's My Line" format.

Who knows. Maybe you'll see me over there again soon, as I've recently seemed to have lost in interest in participating in a certain other forum around here.

(...YOU know, that one which seems dominated about either talk of a certain inarticulate fat-butted politico man-child OR about talk of how men "should go their own way"!) LOL

;)

Well, you and I could always start our own Thread about Kirk Douglas. I know we agree on many things, but maybe that's my favorite thing that we agree on. 

 

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5 hours ago, Dargo said:

Actually Princess, I believe British Shakespearean stage actor and considered the best in his day, Edmund Kean (1887-1833) has been recognized to have been the first to have coined that line upon his deathbed.

However, I understand Edmund Gwenn has also been attributed the line.

And my guess is that over these many years, and because both gentlemen shared a common given name, Gwenn might have been given credit for it, and even though he might have also said it as he died.

(...now, Edmund LOWE I believe is famous for saying upon HIS deathbed something like, "I KNEW I shouldn't have eaten those raw oysters in a month spelled without the letter 'r' in it!")

;)

 

I was never sure where that succinct quote originated, other than recalling Peter O'Toole saying it in My Favorite Year - turns out I was not alone in my uncertainty:

http://www.thewriteroomblog.com/dying-is-easy-comedy-is-hard/

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Gold (1934) - German science fiction drama from UFA and director Karl Hartl. Hans Albers stars as Werner Holk, an engineer who is working with Professor Achenbach (Friedrich Kabler) on a machine that will turn lead into gold. When an "accident" occurs that costs the Professor his life, Holk swears vengeance, and determines that the mastermind behind the sabotage was Scottish millionaire John Wills (Michael Bohnen), who has his own rival group working on the same machine. Wills actually hires Holk on to help make his machine a success, and while at first Holk is determined to destroy Wills' effort from within, when Holk meets Wills' daughter Florence (Brigitte Helm) he begins to second guess his mission. Also featuring Ernst Karchow, Lien Deyers, and Eberhard Leithoff.

This was one of UFA's biggest productions, and no expense was spared constructing the vast set containing the alchemical machine. Footage of the apparatus was later reused in The Magnetic Monster (1953). Despite the spectacle, this movie is at heart a drama about revenge, a rumination on science run amok, and a low-key if effective romance. Albers, an actor I was largely unfamiliar with, is very good. Reading up on him, I learned that he was Germany's biggest star from 1930-1945, and is often referred to as "Germany's John Wayne". He wasn't a Nazi and never a sympathizer with their cause, but he was embraced by the Nazi regime, and when the war ended his career basically went with it, although he later had several smaller, character parts. Helm, most famous for Metropolis, is also good as the rich man's daughter who has everything but love in her life.   (7/10)

Source: Kino DVD.

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