Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

THE BREAKFAST CLUB (1985)

This is the first time I've seen this movie, and I really liked it. Typically, movies that take place in one area in their entirety (e.g. 12 Angry Men) can either be great or catastrophic, but this one managed to hold my interest for the entire hour and a half (approximate). These John Hughes films are already quickly becoming classics among teens and millennials (probably due to the relatability/content). 

Starring: Judd Nelson, Ally Sheedy, Emilio Estevez, Molly Ringwald, & Anthony Michael Hall. 

Related image

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

9 TO 5 (1980)

Starring Jane Fonda, Dolly Parton, Lily Tomlin, & Dabney Coleman 

This is a re-watch; I was in the mood to watch this again for some reason. 

Related image

Loved this movie since I was a little girl. One of the funniest movies ever made (though Hart wouldn't get away with any of his crap towards Dolly Parton's character without being hit with a sexual harassment suit in this century).

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hide-Out (1934) - Amiable romantic comedy from MGM and director W.S. Van Dyke. Robert Montgomery is "Lucky" Wilson, a mid-level mobster and inveterate ladies man. Police detective MacCarthy (Edward Arnold) targets Lucky as the weak link in the mob's organization, so they move to bring him in. Lucky escapes, but takes a bullet in the side which causes him to pass out behind the wheel of his car somewhere in the rural countryside. He's discovered by a nice farm family who decide to nurse him back to health. Lucky is slow to adjust to farm life, but it gets more appealing when he meets farmer's daughter Pauline (Maureen O'Sullivan). Also featuring Mickey Rooney, Whitford Kane, Elizabeth Patterson, Edward Brophy, C. Henry Gordon, Muriel Evans, Henry Armetta, Herman Bing, Harold Huber, and Douglass Dumbrille.

This is likable enough, though not terribly memorable. Montgomery mixes easy charm with an undercurrent of sleaze in his early scenes, but that disappears once things move to the farm setting. O'Sullivan is pleasant, although listening to the family's various accents, I'm not sure who was raised where. This earned an Oscar nomination for Best Writing, Original Story (Mauri Grashin), and was remade in 1941 as I'll Wait for You with Robert Sterling and Marsha Hunt in the leads.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

hideout1934_2013_678x380_07252016040337.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jane Eyre (1934) - First sound film adaptation of Charlotte Bronte's oft-filmed tale, from Monogram and director Christy Cabanne. Virginia Bruce stars in the title role, a young woman raised in an orphanage who hires on as a governess of the niece of the cranky Mr. Rochester (Colin Clive). As Jane tries to find her way within the household, she starts to fall in love with her boss while also wondering about the strange screams coming from the room she's forbidden to look in. Also featuring Beryl Mercer, David Torrence, Aileen Pringle, Edith Fellows, John Rogers, Lionel Belmore, Jameson Thomas, Richard Quine, and Jean Darling.

Some sources have called this the best movie ever made by a Poverty Row studio. There are plenty that I liked more than this, but I'm not really the audience for this type of story. The acting is decent, and the costumes and sets are nicer than in most Monogram efforts, but it still seems clunky, sometimes amateurish, and with very uninspired direction. Running at just over an hour, it's not a major investment in time.   (5/10)

Source: YouTube.

hqdefault.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Jimmy the Gent (1934) - Fast-paced, cynical comedy from Warner Brothers and director Michael Curitz. Jimmy Corrigan (James Cagney) runs a shady operation that sets up phony heirs to collect the fortunes of deceased people who left no legitimate inheritors. This brings him into conflict with another firm headed by the suave Wallingham (Alan Dinehart), and particularly with Wallingham's secretary Joan (Bette Davis), who disapproves of Jimmy's modus operandi. Both firms set about trying to outwit one another for the latest big money case. Also featuring Allen Jenkins, Alice White, Arthur Hohl, Mayo Methot, Phillip Reed, Hobart Cavanaugh, Renee Whitney, Ralf Harolde, Dennis O'Keefe, Pat Wing, Robert Warwick, and Joe Sawyer.

Cagney is terrific here, with his hair shaved at the sides, and his suits looking a size too small, both accentuating his machine-gun line delivery and coiled-spring body language. Davis is still in her "cute" period, although her pencil eyebrows are a bit too much. The stars have great chemistry together, even if neither one wanted to make the movie, and Davis was so furious over Cagney's haircut that she refused to do publicity photos with him! The supporting cast of familiar faces is good, and the script, by Bertram Millhauser, has a lot of great lines. The stars' dismissal of the project as low fluff is accurate to a degree, but it's very well done fluff, and an enjoyable diversion.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

09-davis-cagney.jpg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Jimmy the Gent (1934) - Fast-paced, cynical comedy from Warner Brothers and director Michael Curitz. Jimmy Corrigan (James Cagney) runs a shady operation that sets up phony heirs to collect the fortunes of deceased people who left no legitimate inheritors. This brings him into conflict with another firm headed by the suave Wallingham (Alan Dinehart), and particularly with Wallingham's secretary Joan (Bette Davis), who disapproves of Jimmy's modus operandi. Both firms set about trying to outwit one another for the latest big money case. Also featuring Allen Jenkins, Alice White, Arthur Hohl, Mayo Methot, Phillip Reed, Hobart Cavanaugh, Renee Whitney, Ralf Harolde, Dennis O'Keefe, Pat Wing, Robert Warwick, and Joe Sawyer.

Cagney is terrific here, with his hair shaved at the sides, and his suits looking a size too small, both accentuating his machine-gun line delivery and coiled-spring body language. Davis is still in her "cute" period, although her pencil eyebrows are a bit too much. The stars have great chemistry together, even if neither one wanted to make the movie, and Davis was so furious over Cagney's haircut that she refused to do publicity photos with him! The supporting cast of familiar faces is good, and the script, by Bertram Millhauser, has a lot of great lines. The stars' dismissal of the project as low fluff is accurate to a degree, but it's very well done fluff, and an enjoyable diversion.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

09-davis-cagney.jpg

Though not up to classic status like White Heat or All About Eve, I have to say I quite enjoyed this flick. It's certainly not It Happened One Night, but I doubt the filmmakers were aiming their sights THAT high. It's just an enjoyable romp with two great actors whose best work laid just ahead of them.

Jimmy and Bette do click in here very well. Jimmy still looks so FINE even with this hair style, I would have told Bette to lighten up.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Jane Eyre (1934) - First sound film adaptation of Charlotte Bronte's oft-filmed tale, from Monogram and director Christy Cabanne. Virginia Bruce stars in the title role, a young woman raised in an orphanage who hires on as a governess of the niece of the cranky Mr. Rochester (Colin Clive). As Jane tries to find her way within the household, she starts to fall in love with her boss while also wondering about the strange screams coming from the room she's forbidden to look in. Also featuring Beryl Mercer, David Torrence, Aileen Pringle, Edith Fellows, John Rogers, Lionel Belmore, Jameson Thomas, Richard Quine, and Jean Darling.

Some sources have called this the best movie ever made by a Poverty Row studio. There are plenty that I liked more than this, but I'm not really the audience for this type of story. The acting is decent, and the costumes and sets are nicer than in most Monogram efforts, but it still seems clunky, sometimes amateurish, and with very uninspired direction. Running at just over an hour, it's not a major investment in time.   (5/10)

Source: YouTube.

hqdefault.jpg

I like the cast, but I agree that some of the zest is out of the story.  It is from one of the best books ever written, but both versions (also the 1944) of the film are missing key characters abd plot elements.  I read that period pieces tend to be lengthy, so they attempt to keep them within a certain frame of time.  Even the superb 1944 adaptation with Joan Fontaine and Orson Welles misses part of the story, but has more substance.  That said, it was interesting viewing this one as well, if only to view how Jane and Mr. Rochester were perceived.

  I give this a 6 out of 10.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
09-davis-cagney.jpg

I find this haircut funny too. I first spotted it on Frank Morgan in 1940's LITTLE SHOP AROUND THE CORNER and wondered about it's origin & popularity.
But Bette Davis and James Cagney together is always electric in a movie! You just feel their strength.

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Jimmy the Gent (1934) - The stars' dismissal of the project as low fluff is accurate to a degree, but it's very well done fluff, and an enjoyable diversion.   (7/10)

 

Cagney was dismissive of all his small budget pre-coders. He did them a disservice for the vast majority of them are fast, punchy entertaining time wasters (Blonde Crazy, Taxi, Jimmy the Gent, etc.) with Cagney really at the peak of his energetic drive as a performer even if, dramatically, his great stuff was yet to come with the bigger "A" projects ahead.

It's a shame that TCM can't get broadcast rights to Ceiling Zero, a well acted 1935 aviation drama based on a stage property. Cagney undoubtedly regarded this film as a step up in prestige from the Jimmy the Gents (which it was).

Cagney plays his usual hot shot pilot who is also a womanizer in the film.

One of my favourite lighter moments in an otherwise very serious film is when he flirts with a large corpulent woman, implying they should "get it on." She laughs at the suggestion and walks away giggling.

Cagney then turns to someone nearby and says, "She thinks I'm kidding."

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

There are now only 9 Cagney movies that I haven't seen. Ceiling Zero is one of them. 

Ceiling Zero is definitely one of Cagney's better films, Lawrence. Its story reminds me a bit of Only Angels Have Wings, since it deals with pilots risking their lives in decrepit air ships, and their dedication to their job. Of course, both films were directed by Howard Hawks.

There is currently a nice looking print of Ceiling Zero available on VeeHD.com. I can't play the video (it may have something to do with my computer software) but I was able to download it onto my hard drive and watch it then.

It's a fine film.

A warning about the website, though. I had problems with it in the past before I had AdBlock Plus installed on my computer. Everything has been fine with the website for me since then.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

King Kelly of the U.S.A. (1934) - Dopey musical from Monogram and director Leonard Fields. Guy Robertson stars as James Kelly, a two-bit showgirl revue producer who's taking his show to Europe. On the trans-Atlantic boat ride, he meets secret princess Tania (Irene Ware) and the two fall for each other. She's been promised to another, though, so she disappears to save Kelly the heartache. He can't forget her, so along with his pal Happy (Edgar Kennedy), he heads to the tiny kingdom of Belgardia to find her. Also featuring Ferdinand Gottschalk, Franklin Pangborn, Joyce Compton, Wilhelm von Brincken, Bodil Rosing, and Hattie McDaniel.

Robertson, making his sole film appearance, was a top-selling recording artist of the day. He has a decent voice for the style of the time, and his acting isn't bad, but he's not very charismatic or compelling on the screen. The handful of songs are unmemorable, and the comedy is barely more than smirk-worthy. Much of it is based on the fact that the nation of Belgardia has an economy based on the manufacture of mops, and no one wants mops anymore, according to the script.   (4/10)

Source: Mill Creek DVD, part of the 50 Classic Musicals box set.

King_Kelly_of_the_USA-209x300.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

King Kelly of the U.S.A. (1934) -

....the comedy is barely more than smirk-worthy. Much of it is based on the fact that the nation of Belgardia has an economy based on the manufacture of mops, and no one wants mops anymore, according to the script.   (4/10)

 

I dunno, Lawrence. I gotta say when I read this line in your review here, the thing about "mops", it elicited more than just a "smirk" from me here. Yep, I actually laughed out loud at that thought.

(...and so, how about givin' this baby another point and make your rating a 5/10, and just for THAT???)

;)

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Stachka (1925).

Sergei Eisenstein's first film, an archetype about a bunch of factory workers who go on strike.  There's little plot and even less characterization here, but Eisenstein shows at this early age he has a very good grasp of camera techniques, and that does make the movie worth a watch.

7/10.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Kiss and Make-Up (1934) - Entertaining romantic comedy from Paramount Pictures and director Harlan Thompson. Cary Grant is Dr. Maurice Lamar, a Parisian plastic surgeon and beauty expert with a large fanbase of women, both previous and current clients, who adore him for his work and his looks. Rich husband Marcel (Edward Everett Horton) implores Dr. Lamar to not work on his homely wife, but the doctor does so anyway, and the newly beautified Eve (Genevieve Tobin) leaves her husband for the doctor. Meanwhile, Lamar's secretary Anne (Helen Mack) has secretly been in love with the doctor for a long time, but when he starts seeing Eve, she begins seeing Marcel, with the resulting inter-couple shenanigans. Also featuring Lucien Littlefield, Toby Wing, Mona Maris, Henry Armetta, and the "WAMPAS Baby Stars of 1934", including Julie Bishop, Gigi Parrish, and Helen (daughter of George M.) Cohan. 19-year-old Ann Sheridan also appears in a minor part.

This is a mix of several comedy styles: the European sophistication of an Ernst Lubitsch film, the screwball antics that would shortly become so popular, and even some broad slapstick, with a car-chase finale that seems lifted from a Keystone Kops short. Grant is good here, showing many of the qualities of his well-know screen persona. He sings a song at one point, and his warbling vocal isn't too awful. Mack and Tobin are okay in the female leads, but this may have been better with others in their roles. Horton is reliably funny. This was the final year of the WAMPAS Baby Stars lists of promising young actresses, a promotional endeavor started by the Western Association of Motion Picture Advertisers back in 1922. "Baby Star" was another term for "starlet" back then, if the name confused anyone like it did me. While previous lists had included the likes of Joan Crawford, Clara Bow, Ginger Rogers, Mary Astor, and Fay Wray, this final year's roster didn't include any luminaries, with the biggest future name in the pretty-background-girl cast (Ann Sheridan) not on the list. Jean Negulesco is listed as "associate director".   (7/10)

Source: Universal DVD, part of the Cary Grant Screen Legends Collection.

614fbf105b72a601d6c8ca00429cff69--vintag

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

A Lost Lady (1934) - Weepy yawnfest from First National and director Alfred E. Green. Barbara Stanwyck stars as Marian, a lady with poor luck when it comes to finding love. Her fiancee is murdered right in front of her, which understandably makes her sad and lazy. One day she falls off a cliff and rich guy Forrester (Frank Morgan) happens along and rescues her, taking her home and nursing her back to health. She falls for the much older man thanks to his caring personality, but since he's Frank Morgan and she's Barbara Stanwyck you know things can't last. Enter sleazeball pilot Ellinger (Ricardo Cortez), who seduces Marian with his dubious charms. Also featuring Lyle Talbot with furrowed brow, Phillip Reed, Hobart Cavanaugh, Henry Kolker, Rafaela Ottiano, Samuel S. Hinds, Jameson Thomas, and Willie Fung.

It's hard to sympathize with Stanwyck's character when she's the unfaithful one. Given what's revealed about her fiancee at the beginning, and then her attraction to Cortez, she seems to have a type, and it isn't nice guys. I couldn't find anything remarkable or compelling about any of this, a competently made tearjerker programmer with some good performers (and some not so good) turning in mediocre performances based on a hackneyed script.   (5/10)

Source: TCM.

8e201251e9919d3aada8c489ca56703b--band-p

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Bridges at Toko-Ri (1955) first time I've seen it. I was SHOCKED when William Holden, Mickey Rooney and Earl Holliman die at the end. I thought it was going to be a big thundering war movie where everybody gets out alive and all the Commies day.

Fredric March as the old Admiral was stoic and memorable. His final speech "Where do we get such men?" really got to me. It's one of the few Korean war movies I've seen and I thought it was very well done.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎11‎/‎20‎/‎2017 at 5:08 PM, CinemaInternational said:

The Postman Always Rings Twice (1981) -- viewed on CinemaxMPW-42739

 

I had always heard that this remake of the 1946 classic film noir did not add up to much, that it added graphic sex scenes, but was just a pale imitation of the original. Well, now, as of today's showing on Cinemax, I can say that this statement is unfounded in reality. True, the 1946 classic is still the better film with its taut pacing, moody black-and-white photography and career-best work from John Garfield and Lana Turner. But this 1981 version is a more than satisfying film. 

Indeed, while the much ballyhooed sex scenes just seem excessive, the ending leaves out the ironic twist that gave the story its title, and a scene with Anjelica Huston as a lion trainer seems out of place this is still a sturdy textbook example of a worthy early-80s film, treated badly at the time, that appears much stronger and finely wrought today, daring and fascinating in a time where too many new blockbusters seem pallid.  Jack Nicholson turns in fine work as the drifter drawn into an affair first and murder later. As the femme fatale, Jessica Lange is even better and has remarkable control in what was only her fourth film. It remains some of her best work in her prestigious career.  John Colicos also makes a strong impression as Lange's husband. the 1934 period detail is meticulously well-done and Sven Nykvist's luscious cinematography is ideal. And this  story still has its punch. It is about time for this film to be reappraised.

Jack and Jessica Lange turn in excellent performances in here but I have to take issue with the 'more than satisfying film' theory. I found it frusterating on so many levels. Of course I had read the novel before I saw either film version.

Many powerful scenes in the book (such as Cora lashing out at Frank after he betrayed her by signing the complaint against her or when she threatened to turn him over to the police when she discovers he was playing around on her) were practically reduced to nothing in this version.

The ending of course was the most unsatisfying thing about the film, I have to wonder if the director, screenwriter and cast really understood at all what the title of the story was supposed to mean. By merely ending it with Cora's death, it undermines Cain's take on crime and ironic punishment. Justice needed to be dished out for both characters, and in the novel and the original film it is, but not in here. Cora's death isn't satisfactory enough, even if the murder was all her idea. Ending the film with Frank merely weeping over her dead body just doesn't cut it.

And in truth, despite the absence of any graphic sex scenes in the 1946 film,  Garfield and Turner's interpretations of Frank and Cora are actually closer to what Cain had written more than Nicholson and Lange's versions in the 1981 film.

But believe it or not, despite this I actually do like the 1981 film, if only for the powerful work of Nicholson and Lange....but I just happen to feel the 1946 movie had a better feel for Cain's original story.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, marcar said:

Bridges at Toko-Ri (1955) first time I've seen it. I was SHOCKED when William Holden, Mickey Rooney and Earl Holliman die at the end. I thought it was going to be a big thundering war movie where everybody gets out alive and all the Commies day.

Fredric March as the old Admiral was stoic and memorable. His final speech "Where do we get such men?" really got to me. It's one of the few Korean war movies I've seen and I thought it was very well done.

I remember that being my very reaction also the first time I watched this film as a teenager back in the late-'60s on the old ABC Sunday Night Movie series, Marisa.

Yep, that ending stuck with me for days.

(...and yes again...March's speech at the end is truly one of the more memorable in all the war movie genre, isn't it)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, TomJH said:

Cagney was dismissive of all his small budget pre-coders. He did them a disservice for the vast majority of them are fast, punchy entertaining time wasters (Blonde Crazy, Taxi, Jimmy the Gent, etc.) with Cagney really at the peak of his energetic drive as a performer even if, dramatically, his great stuff was yet to come with the bigger "A" projects ahead.

It's a shame that TCM can't get broadcast rights to Ceiling Zero, a well acted 1935 aviation drama based on a stage property. Cagney undoubtedly regarded this film as a step up in prestige from the Jimmy the Gents (which it was).

Cagney plays his usual hot shot pilot who is also a womanizer in the film.

One of my favourite lighter moments in an otherwise very serious film is when he flirts with a large corpulent woman, implying they should "get it on." She laughs at the suggestion and walks away giggling.

Cagney then turns to someone nearby and says, "She thinks I'm kidding."

So, what's the deal with Ceiling Zero? I thought TCM pretty much had the rights to all the pre-1949 Warner Bros. films, which it is. Somewhat in disbelief, I checked out MovieCollectorOH's database, and sure enough, it's never aired on TCM. Do you know the backstory behind its unavailability?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...