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We're Not Dressing (1934) - Decent musical comedy re-working of The Admirable Crichton, from Paramount Pictures and director Norman Taurog. Spoiled socialite Doris Worthington (Carole Lombard) gets stranded on a tropical island when her pleasure cruise ends up sinking. She and her equally pampered friends struggle to survive, but working-class sailor Stephen Jones (Bing Crosby) has the know-how to make things work, and naturally the two, who start out bickering, eventually fall in love. Also featuring George Burns, Gracie Allen, Ethel Merman, Ray Milland, Leon Errol, Jay Henry, and a bear.

Bing gets to sing a lot, which is a plus, even if his numbers end with a bear tackling him. Ethel gets to sing a few, too. The disc I watched was defective, and I didn't see the opening credits, so it wasn't until about halfway through the film that I realized the petite brunette was Ethel Merman! Burns & Allen seem like they're in a separate movie for much of the runtime, and their scenes play out like their vaudeville act, which is fine by me as I find Gracie hilarious.   (7/10)

Source: Universal DVD, part of the Carole Lombard Glamour Collection.

werenotdressing.jpg

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On 12/4/2017 at 8:07 PM, Dargo said:

Or perhaps closely "related" to And Then There Were None (1945) and/or ITS "offspring"/remake, Ten Little Indians (1965), eh Lawrence?!

I too thought the same thing, (though I am not Lawrence).  Similar to And Then There Were None, the superb '45 film.  I did not care for the remake too much and missed some innuendoes along the way, Shirley Eaton, etc.  I was about 14 at the time and simply felt that the older one was best!  I think it still holds up.

 I liked this one too.  Very cleverly done and a good cast.

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You're Telling Me! (1934) - Hilarious comedy from Paramount Pictures and director Erle C. Kenton. W.C. Fields is Sam Bisbee, a small-town inventor with a henpecking wife (Louise Carter) and a teenage daughter (Joan Marsh) who wants to marry the scion (Buster Crabbe) of the town's wealthiest family. When Sam has trouble demonstrating his new invention, he's about to hit rock bottom when a chance meeting with a sympathetic princess (Adrienne Ames) may turn his life around. Also featuring Kathleen Howard, Nora Cecil, George Irving, and Tammany Young.

I laughed a lot at this one, from the opening with a drunken Fields trying to sneak into his house late at night, to his struggles with his wife, to the unlikely humor of a protracted suicide attempt, and the final golf outing, featuring Fields' frequent sideman Tammany Young. The cast are all game, and I was especially impressed with Ames as the helpful royal. Recommended.   (8/10)

Source: Universal DVD, part of the WC Fields Comedy Collection.

Youre-Telling-Me-1934-W.-C.-Fields-and-T

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The Pace That Kills (1935) - Another social awareness/drug scare flick from exploitation producer Willis Kent and director William A. O'Connor. This tells the tragic tale of Jane Bradford (Lois January), a small-town diner waitress who has the misfortune of crossing paths with Nick (Noel Madison) a slick, Big City drug dealer who offers Jane some "headache powders" that really do a trick on her. Soon enough, she's strung out and living with Nick in the Big City. Her brother Eddie (Dean Benton) comes to the Big City to look for her, but winds up working as a carhop at a drive-in restaurant where he meets Fanny (Sheila Bromley) another carhop who gives Eddie some special "headache powders"... Also featuring Lois Lindsay, Charles Delaney, Eddie Phillips, Frank Shannon, and Fay Holden.

This is a remake of a 1928 silent, and was itself re-edited and re-titled The Cocaine Fiends and released again in 1937. The acting is as awful as the script, the pace doesn't kill as much as induce sleep, and the hatchet-job on the editing leaves much of this a confused mess. Despite Jane and Eddie both getting gacked out on coke, their "lonely trail of addiction" leads to a Chinatown opium den. But I suppose all paths lead to destruction when confronted with "dope evil", and as the opening screen crawl suggests, it's up to "you, Mr. Citizen, to put a stop to it". I'll get right on that.   (3/10)

Source: Mill Creek DVD, part of Taboo Tales set.

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1 hour ago, Sam Mac said:

I just watched the 1935 "Scrooge" and had the unfortunate let-down to hear the concluding remarks of that new presenter munkenstein or whatever is his name (who replaced dear Rober Osborne). Tell him it is called "CHRISTMAS" and NOT "HOLIDAY"!  Just because he is a STEIN we have to hear the propaganda here too?  It is called "CHRISTMAS" and NOT "HOLIDAY," Mr. STEIN!  You don't like it, QUIT and let someone else do Mr. Osborne's job! We are fed up with stein-propaganda everywhere and don't need it here!

 

Not sure where you're getting the "-stein," his name is Ben Mankiewicz and he's not new.  He's been on TCM for years.  If you don't like him, then put him on mute or don't watch.  Christmas, holiday, whatever.  There are other holidays this season besides Christmas.

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21 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Not sure where you're getting the "-stein," his name is Ben Mankiewicz and he's not new.  He's been on TCM for years.  If you don't like him, then put him on mute or don't watch.  Christmas, holiday, whatever.  There are other holidays this season besides Christmas.

C'mon speedy, I know you're fairly young and all, but surely you know "Stein" is "code" for when people such as Sammy Baby here actually WANT to say (and excuse me here folks AND our Moderators for the following BUT the following HAS to be SAID) something such as "Jew Boy", but these people are JUST smart enough to know that saying THAT would pass even LESS muster in polite society.

(...yeah, I know you know, speedy...I know)

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3 hours ago, Sam Mac said:

I just watched the 1935 "Scrooge" and had the unfortunate let-down to hear the concluding remarks of that new presenter munkenstein or whatever is his name (who replaced dear Rober Osborne). Tell him it is called "CHRISTMAS" and NOT "HOLIDAY"!  Just because he is a STEIN we have to hear the propaganda here too?  It is called "CHRISTMAS" and NOT "HOLIDAY," Mr. STEIN!  You don't like it, QUIT and let someone else do Mr. Osborne's job! We are fed up with stein-propaganda everywhere and don't need it here!

(Jack Lemmon voice, from the Kenneth Branagh "Hamlet") What, has this thing appeared again?  :lol:

C'mon speedy, I know you're fairly young and all, but surely you know "Stein" is "code" for when people such as Sammy Baby here actually WANT to say (and excuse me here folks AND our Moderators for the following BUT the following HAS to be SAID) something such as "Jew Boy", but these people are JUST smart enough to know that saying THAT would pass even LESS muster in polite society.

Somebody obviously went crying to the Trump-supporter forums saying that "TCM is part of the leftwing media conspiracy!", called for a Salman Rushdie order, and....this guy and one or two other showed up.

But still, when you're trying to accuse "Jew-boy Ben" of just using the secular "Happy Holidays" (part of the Media's War Against Christmas)...erm, aren't you a little confused, friend?   :blink:
Like, did you have any material when you came here, or are you pretty much just winging it at this point?

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Lady on a Train (1945):

Entertaining, nicely paced little romp with extra points for Edward Everett Horton coming up with rhymes like...

Find a penny in a well

and all your troubles... er.. disappear....

Also of interest for the sequence showing long-gone elevated railways (though I always wince at the sight of Ms Durbin meandering down the right of way, narrowly not getting squished by speeding trains, whilst simultaneously not tripping over the 3rd rail carrying something in the region of 700 crackling volts DC...).

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2 hours ago, limey said:

Lady on a Train (1945):

Entertaining, nicely paced little romp with extra points for Edward Everett Horton coming up with rhymes like...

Find a penny in a well

and all your troubles... er.. disappear....

Also of interest for the sequence showing long-gone elevated railways (though I always wince at the sight of Ms Durbin meandering down the right of way, narrowly not getting squished by speeding trains, whilst simultaneously not tripping over the 3rd rail carrying something in the region of 700 crackling volts DC...).

It's actually still there, it's the Park Avenue viaduct for the Old NY Central RR, now Metro North. It's also seen at street level in The Pawnbroker and as the stone tunnel Tommy runs through in The Window.

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10 hours ago, Sam Mac said:

I just watched the 1935 "Scrooge" and had the unfortunate let-down to hear the concluding remarks of that new presenter munkenstein or whatever is his name (who replaced dear Rober Osborne). Tell him it is called "CHRISTMAS" and NOT "HOLIDAY"!  Just because he is a STEIN we have to hear the propaganda here too?  It is called "CHRISTMAS" and NOT "HOLIDAY," Mr. STEIN!  You don't like it, QUIT and let someone else do Mr. Osborne's job! We are fed up with stein-propaganda everywhere and don't need it here!

 

Great to hear from a newbe with no anger issues.

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4 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

It's actually still there, it's the Park Avenue viaduct for the Old NY Central RR, now Metro North. It's also seen at street level in The Pawnbroker and as the stone tunnel Tommy runs through in The Window.

So, is the station where Durbin steps down onto the tracks, Harlem–125th Street?

Judging by the building on the right, it looks like it is - though the foreground building on the left now appears to be a parking lot.

5a2bfdf080744_LadyonaTrainelstation.thumb.jpg.f0ec8c073c46a2d0fb749573d9bc8936.jpg

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12 hours ago, Sam Mac said:

I just watched the 1935 "Scrooge" and had the unfortunate let-down to hear the concluding remarks of that new presenter munkenstein or whatever is his name (who replaced dear Rober Osborne). Tell him it is called "CHRISTMAS" and NOT "HOLIDAY"!  Just because he is a STEIN we have to hear the propaganda here too?  It is called "CHRISTMAS" and NOT "HOLIDAY," Mr. STEIN!  You don't like it, QUIT and let someone else do Mr. Osborne's job! We are fed up with stein-propaganda everywhere and don't need it here!

 

 

You seem to have a big problem. Take it elsewhere. No one here is interested.

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7 hours ago, limey said:

So, is the station where Durbin steps down onto the tracks, Harlem–125th Street?

Judging by the building on the right, it looks like it is - though the foreground building on the left now appears to be a parking lot.

5a2bfdf080744_LadyonaTrainelstation.thumb.jpg.f0ec8c073c46a2d0fb749573d9bc8936.jpg

Yea 125th St. What's gone besides the building mentioned is that overhead track signal, a lot of the viaduct was rebuilt and that signal was replaced with more modern stand alone versions.

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ZODIAC (2007)

starring Robert Downey, Jr., Jake Gyllenhaal, and Mark Ruffalo. I stumbled upon this movie purely by accident (meaning I wasn't looking for it when I logged onto Netflix the other day). I am interested in true crime stories, and obviously the Zodiac was one of the more prolific American degenerates in the 20th century. I am fascinated by the mental aspect of homicides (that is to say, the psychological piece). It fascinates me just how complex a machine the human brain is, and how, if provoked, it can suffer a snap/fracture, and begin to operate outside "normal" standards. 

That being said, I didn't enjoy this movie as much as I had anticipated. It started off fairly promising, but as the movie traveled on, unfortunately my brain and attention span did not travel on with it. It kind of reminded me of the film "JFK," in the sense that both of these films could have potentially prospered from a shorter running time. 

Source: Netflix; 2.5/5 

Image result for zodiac 2007

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12 hours ago, hamradio said:

"Django Unchained" (2012) for the first time.  Had no idea parts of it would be so funny.:lol:

I can't see **** out of these things.

maxresdefault.jpg

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTy_W3hbebR_0HAdAPBN6O

 

Boom!

loud.png

That is surprising.

 

12 hours ago, hamradio said:

"Django Unchained" (2012) for the first time.  Had no idea parts of it would be so funny.:lol:

I can't see **** out of these things.

maxresdefault.jpg

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTy_W3hbebR_0HAdAPBN6O

 

Boom!

loud.png

That is surprising.  Missed that one.  Will have to catch it.  A touch of irony makes them more interesting but still very shocking at times.

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Watched Dead Ringer, a 1964 film starring Bette Davis, in a plot very similar to A Stolen Life....once again she plays dual roles of twin sisters, the naughty once again ends up  dying....but there are differences in it. In A Stolen Life (SPOILERS) the bad sister's death is truly an accident, in Dead Ringer, the 'good' sister deliberately kills her wicked sis in cold blood.

And (SPOILER ALERT) unlike in A Stolen Life, 'good' sister Edith (the fact that she kills her sister out of spite to inherit her wealth and glamourous lifestyle makes me question how truly good she was in the first place) doesn't get the happy ending, not that she really deserved to get it by the end of the film. She ends up going to the gas chamber for the murder of her sister's husband that her sister committed with her lover Peter Lawford. Poor Karl Malden (Edith's cop boyfriend) is left in the lurch wondering if the woman being taken to Death Row is in fact the woman that he loved and wanted to marry.

Interesting film. Not up there with All About Eve, The Little Foxes or even the earlier twin sister scenario A Stolen Life, but I found it very much watchable. 7/10 from me.

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4 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Watched Dead Ringer, a 1964 film starring Bette Davis, in a plot very similar to A Stolen Life....once again she plays dual roles of twin sisters, the naughty once again ends up  dying....but there are differences in it. In A Stolen Life (SPOILERS) the bad sister's death is truly an accident, in Dead Ringer, the 'good' sister deliberately kills her wicked sis in cold blood.

And (SPOILER ALERT) unlike in A Stolen Life, 'good' sister Edith (the fact that she kills her sister out of spite to inherit her wealth and glamourous lifestyle makes me question how truly good she was in the first place) doesn't get the happy ending, not that she really deserved to get it by the end of the film. She ends up going to the gas chamber for the murder of her sister's husband that her sister committed with her lover Peter Lawford. Poor Karl Malden (Edith's cop boyfriend) is left in the lurch wondering if the woman being taken to Death Row is in fact the woman that he loved and wanted to marry.

Interesting film. Not up there with All About Eve, The Little Foxes or even the earlier twin sister scenario A Stolen Life, but I found it very much watchable. 7/10 from me.

I liked Dead Ringer too with Bette Davis.  It is similar in some ways to A Stolen Life.  She was good in it and so was Peter Lawford.  It was very watchable.   Here was the good twin to start with killing her faithless sister and taking her identity.  A number of complications arose, one which had been a signature problem.  She has to pretend to injure her arm so her signature would not be detected as an imposter.

She had a number of things to avoid when impersonating her twin sister.  She could not sign any papers and provided for the signature problem, but she was not aware that her sister did not treat the dog well.  I was touched about the dog.  She struck up a great rapport with him, but it looked suspicious to Peter Lawford's character who was beginning to see her deceptions.  In turn, she was to find out more about her sister's duplicity, as she had been unfaithful to her husband with him.

Yes, it was sad for Karl Malden's character who did not know if the lady he loved was really genuine.  All he knew is that she went to the chair for murder.  He had lost his lady love and did not know the real story or if this was truly the right twin.  It was ironic that Evie had been the good sister to start with.  Not wishing to hurt him further, she would not disclose the true situation.  So he is pained and conflicted.

Though not up to The Stolen Life, or The Little Foxes, I found the twin scenario very interesting too.

 

 

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That Man from Rio (1964).

Jean-Paul Belmondo plays a French soldier on leave who visits his girlfriend (Françoise Dorléac), only for her to get kidnapped because she supposedly knows the location of a statuette her late anthropologist father dug up.  Belmondo follows the kidnappers, which takes him to Brazil.

Ben Mankiewicz called this one of the Bond spoofs with a bunch of other homages, but the one close homage I saw was to Hitchcock movies like The 39 Steps where the hero goes on a long journey to solve the mystery while trying to stay out of trouble.  It's a physically gorgeous movie to watch, especially for the vintage shots of Brasilia, a planned city less than a decade old at the time.  The brutalist, isolating architecture gives this section of the movie a dystopian feel reminiscent of Alphaville.  The characters, however, I found a bit difficult to warm up to.

8/10.

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