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I know it's kind of corny but I love the "Indian Love Call" number from Rose Marie.  I can't help it; I find it romantic and sweet.  

I just watched Inferno on TCM.  Taut thriller that is part western, part adventure story with noir elements even though it takes place in the desert sun and heat.  Robert Ryan is excellent, as always, as the cuckold husband left to die in the desert by his wife and her boyfriend.  Can he survive with a broken leg and hardly any food and water?  I especially liked the ending.  Rhonda Fleming looks good in her western/desert wardrobe as well as her glamorous gowns when she's in her mansion and the mandatory swimsuit scene at a pool.  A girl has to look good when she's pretending to care about her missing husband, right?  ;)

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14 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Prisoner of Shark Island (1936) - Historical drama from 20th Century-Fox and director John Ford.

I'm a big fan of this film. I think it is one of John Ford's unsung masterpieces, typical of the director's artistry.

 

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19 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Prisoner of Shark Island

johncarradine1.jpg

 

I don't think Warner Baxter ever had a finer moment as an actor than in his portrayal of the innocent man railroaded by a political fervour for vengeance in Prisoner of Shark Island. For those who may be taken aback by the pure ham of his Oscar portrayal in In Old Arizona, take a look at the decency he brings to the role of Dr. Mudd, along with the anguish in his portrayal.

Shark.jpg

By the way, historians are divided as to whether the doctor, a slave owner, was the victim of circumstances that he is presented to be in this John Ford drama. I'll tell you one thing about the man. He was a potent devil, fathering four children before his imprisonment and five others following his release.

By the way, according to Wiki, Mudd was imprisoned in Fort Jefferson, in the Dry Tortugas, 70 miles off Key West, Florida. Fort Jefferson was never called Shark Island, but I can forgive the screenwriters for their dramatic license taken here. After all, who would get excited by a film with the title The Prisoner of Fort Jefferson?

160px-SamuelMudd.jpeg

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I was impressed that TCM showed a triple-header (basically) of premieres Friday night/Saturday morning.  I caught bits and pieces of "Man In The Wilderness", which is a great testament to one's individual fortitude.  I got wrapped up in watching basketball while this aired, so I'll try and catch it on TCM Movies On Demand.

I started watching "Inferno", and sure enough, I dozed off 30 minutes into it! :angry:  I'll have to catch that one via computer too.

I woke up mid-way through "Robinson Crusoe" and decided to pull a 'half-nighter' and watch "Into The Wild", which I had never seen before.  The cinematography on the movie was excellent, but the movie was two and a half hours long, which I find to be tedious unless there's plenty of action or dialog to hold my interest.  The acting was very good, and I thought it did a good job of providing an insight to Chris McCandless' psyche.  Overall though, the movie was a bit of a downer.  Many people can relate to the theme that you don't need money or excessive wealth to be happy, and this film effectively showed this.  Still, it was sad that the main character "checked out" of society at such a young age.  I'm not sure if Chris was ultimately satisfied with what he set out to do.  It's one of the great mysteries movies such as this leaves for the viewer.

In a sense, he turned out to be selfish, whether it was intended or not, because he didn't give himself the chance to do as much good for as many people as possible.  At least, that's my take on his life.  Now, we have to be a little selfish in life with regards to living.  If we don't take adequate care of ourselves, how can we be of service to those who might need us when called upon?  On the other hand, "Into The Wild" is a classic example of one of my favorite sayings; "I never seem to have what I want, but I always seem to have what I need.".  I give ITW a solid 4 out of 5 stars.

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On 1/12/2018 at 12:46 PM, Janet0312 said:

If you liked this cartoon, watch A Bear for Punishment.

Mama Bear turned out to be a natural stage performer in this one. Getta load of these moves . . .

 

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The Story of a Cheat (1936) - Sly, ahead-of-its-time French comedy from writer-director Sacha Guitry. The plot follows the life of an unnamed protagonist who suffers a terrible tragedy in his childhood that sets him along a path in life in which he believes he who cheats avoids getting cheated. Guitry also stars as the adult version of our "hero" a one-time bellboy in a posh hotel who eventually becomes a croupier in Monte Carlo before dabbling in thievery and cheating in casinos under a variety of disguises. Also featuring Marguerite Moreno, Jacqueline Delubac, Roger Duchesne, Rosine Derean, Elmire Vautier, and Serge Grave.

Things get off to a unique start as Guitry introduces the rest of the cast and the crew, not with written credits, but by showing them at work behind-the-scenes or hanging around the sets, with Guitry's voice identifying them. The most unusual thing about this movie is its narrative style. The story is told by the elder version of the protagonist writing his memoirs at an outdoor cafe, and the action occasionally stops for short vignettes at the cafe that interrupt his writing. But for the vast majority of the film, there is little to no spoken dialogue from the characters, but rather everything is narrated in voice-over by Guitry. What seems like a possible annoyance is actually quite charming, no doubt aided by Guitry's pleasant voice. The action moves quickly, and the camerawork is vibrant. Many notable directors have named Guitry as one of their favorites and as an inspiration to their own works, including Orson Welles, Robert Bresson, and Francois Truffaut. I would even add the more recent Wes Anderson, whose work is obviously, if perhaps indirectly, influenced by Guitry's style. This is one of the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die. Recommended.  (8/10)

Source: TCM.

d589290972eb9dd28727b2d77e66cbe7--the-st

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I just watched Dr. No. I had forgotten how wonderful these early James Bond films were. Sean Connery was by far my favorite Bond. The newer ones were great too, but they just don't measure up to the first five. I think Goldfinger was my favorite. I'm watching Thunderball now as BBC is having a marathon. 

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Three Godfathers (1936) - Fifth version of the oft-filmed western, from MGM, producer Joseph L. Mankiewicz, and director Richard Boleslawski. A trio of bank robbers, Bob (Chester Morris), Gus (Walter Brennan) and Doc (Lewis Stone), head into the desert after a daring hold-up. They discover a wagon containing a dying woman with an infant child. They decide to take the baby with them to the next town, only to face a number of set-backs and problems that puts all of their lives in danger. Will these seemingly heartless men change their ways in order to save the child? Also featuring Irene Hervey, Sidney Toler, Dorothy Tree, Roger Imhof, Willard Robertson, Robert Livingston, John Sheehan, Leonid Kinskey, Victor Potel, and Jean Kircher as the baby.

The first film of this story was a short in 1915, while the most famous today is likely the 1948 version with John Wayne in the lead. I've seen that version, but I liked this one more. Morris may not be Wayne in the screen charisma department, but he's more believable as a morally conflicted semi-bad guy. I also really liked Brennan as the simple but affable Gus, and Stone as the tubercular intellectual Doc.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

3godfathers19362.jpg 

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13 hours ago, ChristineHoard said:

 

I just watched Inferno on TCM.  Taut thriller that is part western, part adventure story with noir elements even though it takes place in the desert sun and heat.  Robert Ryan is excellent, as always, as the cuckold husband left to die in the desert by his wife and her boyfriend.  Can he survive with a broken leg and hardly any food and water?  I especially liked the ending.  Rhonda Fleming looks good in her western/desert wardrobe as well as her glamorous gowns when she's in her mansion and the mandatory swimsuit scene at a pool.  A girl has to look good when she's pretending to care about her missing husband, right?  ;)

The gold bathing suit that Ms. Fleming wore was a nice touch.

Ryan, as you state, was excellent. Lundigan was adequate, but I've never been impressed with his presence on screen. Interesting to see a young Carl Betz as one of the policemen. I had to laugh though when Ryan throws a lantern at Lundigan during the climax, and it comes right at the viewer; that was obviously staged to take advantage of 3D.

With the desert locale, it would have been a nice twist if all the characters were done in by giant ants.

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16 minutes ago, scsu1975 said:

The gold bathing suit that Ms. Fleming wore was a nice touch.

Ryan, as you state, was excellent. Lundigan was adequate, but I've never been impressed with his presence on screen. Interesting to see a young Carl Betz as one of the policemen. I had to laugh though when Ryan throws a lantern at Lundigan during the climax, and it comes right at the viewer; that was obviously staged to take advantage of 3D.

With the desert locale, it would have been a nice twist if all the characters were done in by giant ants.

You're too sentimental.

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Wedding Present (1936) - Misfire would-be screwball comedy from Paramount Pictures and director Richard Wallace. Charlie Mason (Cary Grant) and Rusty Fleming (Joan Bennett) are top reporters at a big city newspaper who also have a tempestuous, on-again off-again romance. When Charlie gets promoted to city editor, Rusty resents his putting the job first, and decides to marry uptight writer Roger (Conrad Nagel). Also featuring William Demarest, George Bancroft, Edward Brophy, Gene Lockhart, Inez Courtney, Purnell Pratt, George Meeker, Lois Wilson, Torben Meyer, and Charles Middleton.

The screenwriters throw as much stuff as possible into the story to try and keep things moving quickly and "wacky". Instead it comes across as disjointed, uninspired, forced, and derivative. Bennett comes off the best of the cast, feminine but hard-edged and more than keeping up with the boys. Demarest, Lockhart and Brophy do their usual admirable best with what little they're given, while Bancroft and Nagel are wasted in poor roles. Grant seems the most phony, and while he may be smiling and rattling off the "zinging" dialogue, his eyes look alternately sad or bored. This would be the final film for Grant under his Paramount contract, and while he made quite a few with them, very few were memorable. As he moved on to other studios, the quality of his films increased substantially, and he soon became the screen legend we all know.  (5/10)

Source: Universal DVD, part of the Cary Grant: Screen Legends Collection.

Wedding-Present-1.jpg

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29 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Wedding Present (1936) - Misfire would-be screwball comedy from Paramount Pictures and director Richard Wallace.

This was one of the top films on my bucket list because it starred Grant and Bennett,  but now I know I can cross it off.    But thanks to your useful posts I added a few Rochelle Hudson films to the list.   :D

 

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4 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Three Godfathers (1936) - Fifth version of the oft-filmed western, from MGM, producer Joseph L. Mankiewicz, and director Richard Boleslawski. A trio of bank robbers, Bob (Chester Morris), Gus (Walter Brennan) and Doc (Lewis Stone), head into the desert after a daring hold-up. They discover a wagon containing a dying woman with an infant child. They decide to take the baby with them to the next town, only to face a number of set-backs and problems that puts all of their lives in danger. Will these seemingly heartless men change their ways in order to save the child? Also featuring Irene Hervey, Sidney Toler, Dorothy Tree, Roger Imhof, Willard Robertson, Robert Livingston, John Sheehan, Leonid Kinskey, Victor Potel, and Jean Kircher as the baby.

The first film of this story was a short in 1915, while the most famous today is likely the 1948 version with John Wayne in the lead. I've seen that version, but I liked this one more. Morris may not be Wayne in the screen charisma department, but he's more believable as a morally conflicted semi-bad guy. I also really liked Brennan as the simple but affable Gus, and Stone as the tubercular intellectual Doc.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

 

I've only seen the Wayne version, and I have to admit, I wasn't impressed. Not because Wayne wasn't believable as the semi-bad guy (RED RIVER and THE SEARCHERS proves to me that he can be) but the story itself just didn't grab me.

Maybe I should try and check out this version (if I can find it anywhere) and see if I feel any differently. 

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The Man Who Could Work Miracles (1936) - British fantasy from H.G. Wells, United Artists/London Films, and director Lothar Mendes. A bored cosmic being of some sort decides to bestow god-like power on a simple English shop clerk named Fotheringay (Roland Young). He first uses his new abilities for minor amusements, like making candles float in the air, or to help out his co-workers, such as making a girl's freckles disappear. But the more he thinks about it, the larger his ambitions grow, especially when he seeks advice from the local vicar (Ernest Thesiger) and a conservative old military man (Ralph Richardson). Also featuring Joan Gardner, Edward Chapman, Sophie Stewart, Robert Cochran, Lady Tree, Lawrence Hanray, Joan Hickson, George Sanders, Torin Thatcher, Michael Rennie, and George Zucco.

This was the second film in writer H.G. Wells' two-film contract with producer Alexander Korda, the other being Things to Come, also from 1936. This film is entertaining, if not terribly deep, and doesn't go as far with the concept as I expected given Wells' propensity for political lecturing. Richardson hams it up even more than he did in Things to Come, with heavy theatrical makeup including a big bushy mustache. Thesiger is surprisingly restrained. The image of shirtless Sanders and Thatcher as cosmic gods is a memorable one.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

the-man-who-could-work-miracles-poster-1

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I just watched part of Bullitt, a film I hadn't seen since I was a teenager. The car chase scene seemed kind of lame, in the cold light of 2017. 

 

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THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (2017)

Highly fictionalized movie musical about the life of circus giant, P.T. Barnum, starring Hugh Jackman, Michelle Williams, Zac Efron, Keala Settle, & Zendaya, with music by Benj Pasek and Justin Paul (the team behind La La Land and Broadway's new smash hit, Dear Evan Hansen). 

Upon listening/seeing the music performed in context, my previous opinion that the music was not up to par was shattered. No, it's not Stephen Sondheim caliber by any means, but it was enjoyable and told the stories it was attempting to do, in my opinion. Hugh Jackman was great, and so were the rest of the cast. It was nice to hear Michelle Williams sing again, since many people don't know that she was in the 2014 Broadway revival of Cabaret

I was impressed by the cinematography and the wardrobe, and I'm glad I always try to go into movies with an open mind. I thoroughly enjoyed this. I was pleasantly surprised. SCORE: 3.5/5

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57 minutes ago, Swithin said:

I just watched part of Bullitt, a film I hadn't seen since I was a teenager. The car chase scene seemed kind of lame, in the cold light of 2017. 

Say it ain't so, Swithin!

I must've watched that car chase scene over two dozen times over these many years, and it STILL holds up for ME, anyway.

(...saaaay, you big anglophile, you...ya know I'll bet if it has been staged in London instead of San Francisco, AND with instead of a Ford Mustang chasin' down that Dodge Charger on the RIGHT side of the road, it had an E-Type Jag and say some Rover sedan dueling it out on the WRONG side of the road, you wouldn't be sayin' this right now!!!) ;)

LOL

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5 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

BULLITT isn't a favorite of mine, but having said that, I still think the car chase is the best thing about the film.

Yeah, but I've always felt that with the spare quantity of dialogue in quite a bit of it, this is another aspect to the film which makes it a somewhat unique film, Beth.

(...and so considering this aspect of it, I've also felt that Steve McQueen was not only perfectly cast in it, but also makes the movie, the entire movie, very very watchable)

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46 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

BULLITT isn't a favorite of mine, but having said that, I still think the car chase is the best thing about the film.

Agree. I chose to miss it tonight, including the car chase, in favor of a couple of episodes of Midsomer Murders on PBS. I feel the same about The Great Escape.

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11 hours ago, Dargo said:

Say it ain't so, Swithin!

I must've watched that car chase scene over two dozen times over these many years, and it STILL holds up for ME, anyway.

(...saaaay, you big anglophile, you...ya know I'll bet if it has been staged in London instead of San Francisco, AND with instead of a Ford Mustang chasin' down that Dodge Charger on the RIGHT side of the road, it had an E-Type Jag and say some Rover sedan dueling it out on the WRONG side of the road, you wouldn't be sayin' this right now!!!) ;)

LOL

There have been too many great chase scenes since then. I was ready to be thrilled the way I was in 1968, but it just doesn't hold up. 

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1 hour ago, Swithin said:

There have been too many great chase scenes since then. I was ready to be thrilled the way I was in 1968, but it just doesn't hold up. 

There have been a lot of car chases in action movies and, after a while, they tend to blend into one another for me.

This one, though, still stands apart from the rest, as far as I'm concerned . . .

the-french-connection.gif

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

There have been a lot of car chases in action movies and, after a while, they tend to blend into one another for me.

This one, though, still stands apart from the rest, as far as I'm concerned . . .

the-french-connection.gif

Did you post this because Baldwin and his guest (who was involved with filming this scene) discussed this after Bullitt was shown last night?     If not you're really in tune with the universe!   :)

Either way, thanks for posting it since after seeing that discussion I was going to search for this today to refresh my memory.    

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57 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Did you post this because Baldwin and his guest (who was involved with filming this scene) discussed this after Bullitt was shown last night?     If not you're really in tune with the universe!   :)

Either way, thanks for posting it since after seeing that discussion I was going to search for this today to refresh my memory.    

No, I didn't see the show. I do recall that the car chase in Bullet was regarded as the best one ever filmed until The French Connection's was seen as topping it a few years later by many critics. I have become a belated admirer of French Connection, having seen it at the show when it was originally released and thinking, "Eh, what's the big deal?" Now I can really appreciate the reality of its gritty street presentation, with the car chase the film's highlight sequence. Hackman's hard boiled in-your-face portrayal of a narc is, of course, a classic.

cLR3QPAPU6JfW.gif

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22 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Three Godfathers (1936) - Fifth version of the oft-filmed western, from MGM, producer Joseph L. Mankiewicz, and director Richard Boleslawski. A trio of bank robbers, Bob (Chester Morris), Gus (Walter Brennan) and Doc (Lewis Stone), head into the desert after a daring hold-up. They discover a wagon containing a dying woman with an infant child. They decide to take the baby with them to the next town, only to face a number of set-backs and problems that puts all of their lives in danger. Will these seemingly heartless men change their ways in order to save the child? Also featuring Irene Hervey, Sidney Toler, Dorothy Tree, Roger Imhof, Willard Robertson, Robert Livingston, John Sheehan, Leonid Kinskey, Victor Potel, and Jean Kircher as the baby.

The first film of this story was a short in 1915, while the most famous today is likely the 1948 version with John Wayne in the lead. I've seen that version, but I liked this one more. Morris may not be Wayne in the screen charisma department, but he's more believable as a morally conflicted semi-bad guy. I also really liked Brennan as the simple but affable Gus, and Stone as the tubercular intellectual Doc.   (7/10)

Source: TCM.

 

I guess I'll always prefer the 1930 version from Universal starring Charles Bickford. It's precode so there are some elements there that the 36 and 48 version just couldn't have in them. Bickford's description of making the film was most hilarious. He claimed that he was stuck with bad dialogue, silent actors who did not know how to behave in talkies, and most of all a "nose picking Golem"  for a director - William Wyler. He claimed that if not for him - Charles Bickford - the film would have been a disaster because he single-handedly rewrote the script, taught the actors how to act, and redirected the film since Wyler could not direct as well as he - Charles Bickford - could. I always wondered why Wyler, who was still alive and well in 1966, did not sue Bickford for what he said. Maybe Wyler figured his twelve Academy Award nominations as best director with three wins among those spoke for themselves.

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