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7 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Whenever we start up one of those "most annoying" or "least favorite stars" threads, I always forget to mention Mickey Rooney. Maybe it's because I try to keep him out of mind. I'm reminded why I dislike him so after watching this. His incessant mugging, hyper manner, screeching speaking volume...it all adds up to perpetual phoniness. It may be understandable for someone who grew up on screen to have little relation to normal human emotion or expression, and Rooney would be exhibit #1.

While Mickey Rooney is okay in some roles and I'll tolerate him with Judy Garland (because I like Judy) but, on his own, he is obnoxious.  All of the "qualities" you listed pretty much hits the nail right on the head as to why I dislike him.  I've seen multiple Hollywood documentaries that state that Rooney was one of the most talented actors working... I don't see it.  It's obvious to me why Rooney's career never really progressed beyond Andy Hardy.  He is just not in the same league as the other leading men of the era. 

I read somewhere that Errol Flynn used to go with Rooney to the nightclubs as his "wingman."  Flynn would be the absolute worst wingman.  Yeah, you could use Flynn  to attract the ladies, but who is going to choose to go home with Mickey Rooney with Errol Flynn standing there? 

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19 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I read somewhere that Errol Flynn used to go with Rooney to the nightclubs as his "wingman."  Flynn would be the absolute worst wingman.  Yeah, you could use Flynn  to attract the ladies, but who is going to choose to go home with Mickey Rooney with Errol Flynn standing there? 

I'll give Rooney this, he was a looker back in his day....but there is just NO WAY AT ALL  I would choose him over Errol!

Heck, if I had a choice between Rooney and Edward G. Robinson, I would choose Robinson. What Robinson lacked in looks, he more than made up for it with charisma, something that Rooney could never hope to match.

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Sisters (1938) - Early twentieth century nostalgia and domestic melodrama from Warner Brothers and director Anatole Litvak. The Elliott sisters, Louise (Bette Davis), Helen (Anita Louise), and Grace (Jane Bryan), are all looking for love in their small Montana hometown. Louise finds it in handsome writer Frank (Errol Flynn), and they quickly elope, marrying and settling in his native San Francisco. However, wedded bliss is not to be as Frank's work isn't going well and he turns to the bottle. Also featuring Beulah Bondi, Henry Travers, Ian Hunter, Dick Foran, Donald Crisp, Patric Knowles, Alan Hale, Lee Patrick, Laura Hope Crews, Janet Shaw, Harry Davenport, Stanley Fields, Mayo Methot, and Susan Hayward.

Davis is good in a gentler role; you get the feeling that normal screen Davis would have slapped Flynn out of his funk much earlier, if not left him outright. Errol gets more dramatic heft than usual, and he's up to the challenge, but even when he's supposed to look down and out, he still looks like Errol Flynn. Many of the large supporting cast don't get much to do, and a lengthier running time may have fleshed their storylines out. Still, I found this an improvement over the majority of the 1938 movies that I've watched this week.  (7/10)

Source: TCM.

Sisters1-1938.jpg

I really like this movie.  It allows us to see a more vulnerable side to both Flynn and Davis.  I also really liked Anita Louise in this film.  Flynn and Davis' neighbor was also funny.  I like the earthquake and boxing arena scenes.  In the "Breakdowns of 1938" video on You Tube (I think its 1938, there are multiple videos from different years), there is a blooper from The Sisters.  In the scene where Davis is getting some air in the lobby after finding the boxing too gruesome, Flynn comes out to find Davis sitting in a chair.  He asks her what's wrong and that's when Davis' character is supposed to tell him that she's having a baby.  However, as a joke, she tells Flynn that she just "had the baby in the bathroom."  Flynn cracks up laughing.  

This picture of Flynn you posted, is supposed to be him "disheveled" after he's been out of work for a week or two and is depressed and spends his time moping around the house.  If only we could all look this good disheveled and just waking up.  I don't blame Davis one bit for eloping with Flynn to San Francisco and leaving the tiny town of Silver Bow, Montana. 

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17 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I'll give Rooney this, he was a looker back in his day....but there is just NO WAY AT ALL  I would choose him over Errol!

Heck, if I had a choice between Rooney and Edward G. Robinson, I would choose Robinson. What Robinson lacked in looks, he more than made up for it with charisma, something that Rooney could never hope to match.

Lol.  I have never found Rooney attractive.  While I suppose he isn't the most unattractive actor who ever appeared on the silver screen, his obnoxious persona just ruins whatever he might have had on the outside.

I would have chosen Edward G Robinson over Rooney too--at least he'd be interesting.  Heck, I'd even pick Peter Lorre over Rooney--if only so I could try and get him to say "imbecile" or "you eeem-bis-ell."  Lol.  Peter Lorre's rant toward Sydney Greenstreet is one of my favorite parts of The Maltese Falcon.  

I always laugh in Manhattan Melodrama when Mickey Rooney portrays the younger version of Clark Gable's character.  While obviously in 1934, they didn't know what Rooney would look like as an adult... We're supposed to go along with Mickey Rooney growing up to look like Clark Gable? 

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I gotta pipe in here....I like Rooney for the most part, although I completely agree with all his negative aspects mentioned here. Rooney was manic the same way Jerry Lewis was manic-and (in my opinion) they often come across on film as "trying too hard". Both Lewis & Rooney were extremely talented and possibly just better suited to the stage.

When Rooney (& Lewis for that matter) ratchet themselves down in a more serious role, they can really emote. All of Rooney's Twilight Zone appearances are excellent.

But Rooney's portrayal of the Japanese neighbor in BREAKFAST AT TIFFANYS alone cancels out all his good performances combined. (and LOL choosing bulldog EG Robinson over Rooney....I would too!)
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11 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Rooney has never been one of my favorites either, but he is watchable in some movies (BOYS TOWN, NATIONAL VELVET, and THE BLACK STALLION come to mind).

The one movie that I think he really demonstrated some serious acting ability (and he did win an Emmy for it) was his work as a mentally handicapped man in the TV movie BILL.

But even with that, he certainly wouldn't be in my top 10 of favorite actors.

He wouldn't even make it in my top 50 if truth be told.

He's pretty good in the Noirs Quicksand, Drive a Crooked Road and the Transitional Noir Requiem For A Heavyweight.

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I love QUICKSAND!

Watching the fight between Peter Lorre and Mickey Rooney, is one of the all-time great screen matchups...It’s like watching two angry ferrets go out it.

FYI- THE STRIP (1951) Another ROONEY noir from late in his MGM career is coming on today at two. I wrote more about it in the hits and misses thread if you’re interested. It’s good. 

Hes also superb in THE HUMAN COMEDY, Which is one of my all-time favorite movies. But, I totally understand anybody who is irritated by him in a lot of his other films.

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12 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Sisters (1938) -  I found this an improvement over the majority of the 1938 movies that I've watched this week.  (7/10)

you know, 1938 was not really a good year for great movies. there is a slightly anesthetized, assembly line feel to the general output, not that there aren't some utter classics that did come out that year...But it's something of a watershed year between the superb output of 1932-1937 and 1939-1946.

 

**and having returned from perusing a list of the titles, there are quite a few films released that year that I- HONESTLY- do not care for- BOYS TOWN, JEZEBEL, YOU CAN'T TAKE IT WITH YOU, GRAND ILLUSION, ALGIERS...

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15 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

you know, 1938 was not really a good year for great movies. there is a slightly anesthetized, assembly line feel to the general output, not that there aren't some utter classics that did come out that year...But it's something of a watershed year between the superb output of 1932-1937 and 1939-1946.

 

**and having returned from perusing a list of the titles, there are quite a few films released that year that I- HONESTLY- do not care for- BOYS TOWN, JEZEBEL, YOU CAN'T TAKE IT WITH YOU, GRAND ILLUSION, ALGIERS...

I really wish Jezebel had been shot in color.  I think Bette's scandalous red dress in a sea of white (I think white was what she was expected to wear) would have had more of an impact.  I haven't seen You Can't Take it With You in such a long time, I'll have to watch it again to have an opinion.

The best 1938 film is probably The Adventures of Robin Hood.  Though I also liked Alexander's Ragtime Band, Angels With Dirty Faces, The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse (though honestly, couldn't they have given Edward G Robinson a better name?), The Dawn Patrol, Test Pilot, Vivacious Lady and I know a lot of people on this board dislike this film, but I love Bringing Up Baby.  1938 seems to have been a big year for my man Flynn, it seems he starred in four films this year.

I also see that White Banners with Fay Bainter and Claude Rains came out in 1938 and this is a film that I've seen mentioned a lot here on the boards, but I don't believe I've ever seen it on TCM's schedule (at least during the time that I've really been paying attention to and watching TCM's schedule).  I'd like to see this film. 

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3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I gotta pipe in here....I like Rooney for the most part, although I completely agree with all his negative aspects mentioned here. Rooney was manic the same way Jerry Lewis was manic-and (in my opinion) they often come across on film as "trying too hard". Both Lewis & Rooney were extremely talented and possibly just better suited to the stage.

When Rooney (& Lewis for that matter) ratchet themselves down in a more serious role, they can really emote. All of Rooney's Twilight Zone appearances are excellent.

But Rooney's portrayal of the Japanese neighbor in BREAKFAST AT TIFFANYS alone cancels out all his good performances combined. (and LOL choosing bulldog EG Robinson over Rooney....I would too!)

Rooney is absolutely atrocious in Breakfast at Tiffany's, a film that I otherwise enjoy.  I do not like Rooney's scenes however.  I know Rooney's character, Mr. Yunioshi, is in Truman Capote's original story and he's supposed to be Holly Golightly's exasperated Japanese landlord.  Rooney does the exasperated landlord bit well, it's just the yellow faced, stereotypical caricature that is cringe-worthy.  I would expect something like this in the propaganda films of the 1940s, or even in the Looney Tunes shorts from that era, but I feel that by 1961, during the Civil Rights Era no less, that society would have progressed beyond this representation.  

If Blake Edwards really wanted Rooney in the film, he could have used some creative license and just made Rooney the irritated, Caucasian, landlord and left the yellow face, buck teeth and thick glasses out of it.  Edwards already took license with Holly Golighty's character in order to better suit Audrey Hepburn's persona, why not do it with Yunioshi's character too? I don't know what Edwards or Rooney were thinking with this film.

I've read articles before where Edwards states that he regrets this portrayal.  Whereas, Rooney always states that he was disappointed that people felt this way about his performance. 

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10 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I read somewhere that Errol Flynn used to go with Rooney to the nightclubs as his "wingman."  Flynn would be the absolute worst wingman.  Yeah, you could use Flynn  to attract the ladies, but who is going to choose to go home with Mickey Rooney with Errol Flynn standing there? 

One thing I'll say in Rooney's favour regarding his relationship with Errol Flynn.

When Errol died he was washed up in the film industry. King of the Hollywood mountain that he once may have been, few of his former friends or associates showed up at his funeral.

Mickey Rooney was one of his pall bearers.

I came across this photo, perhaps the only time I've seen Flynn in a shot with Cary Grant

Errol-Cary-Grant-.jpg

 

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11 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Thanks for the Memory (1938) -

thanks-for-the-memory-movie-poster-md.jp 

Another film from the early Bob Hope days in which his screen character was dapper. His early films, for the most part, aren't much as far as entertainment is concerned, slight musical comedy concoctions from Paramount.

The Cat and the Canary would be the film that would start to change Hope's screen persona. He'd still be dapper in appearance (that would change within a few years) but there would be fraidy cat aspects to his characterization, with his nervous wise cracks a perfect counter balance to the mystery aspects of that old house chiller.

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7 minutes ago, TomJH said:

One thing I'll say in Rooney's favour regarding his relationship with Errol Flynn.

When Errol died he was washed up in the film industry. King of the Hollywood mountain that he once may have been, few of his former friends or associates showed up at his funeral.

Mickey Rooney was one of his pall bearers.

I came across this photo, perhaps the only time I've seen Flynn in a shot with Cary Grant

Errol-Cary-Grant-.jpg

 

I have read that Rooney did show up at Flynn's funeral and it seems that it was a genuine show of respect for his friend and I do appreciate that.  I don't dislike Rooney 100% of the time, sometime he seems to have his moments.  Every time I saw Rooney interviewed later in life, he always sounded so angry.  His Private Screenings interview with Robert Osborne was intense.  Speaking of Private Screenings, I wish TCM would re-air all of them or make them available to stream or something.  There are so many episodes of that program that I haven't seen and many of them are some of the last interviews these classic film stars ever did. 

Looking at the picture of Flynn and Cary Grant... The caption states: "A merry foursome when all was gay at a recent party.  Mary Brian, Cary Grant and the Errol Flynns, who are now planning a trip."  Is it just Errol and his wife who are planning the trip? Or all four of them? If so, I wonder if they ever went on said trip and if so, where did they go?

 

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3 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Another film from the early Bob Hope days in which his screen character was dapper. His early films, for the most part, aren't much as far as entertainment is concerned, slight musical comedy concoctions from Paramount.

The Cat and the Canary would be the film that would start to change Hope's screen persona. He'd still be dapper in appearance (that would change within a few years) but there would be fraidy cat aspects to his characterization, with his nervous wise cracks a perfect counter balance to the mystery aspects of that old house chiller.

I love The Cat and the Canary.  It's such a fun film.  I'd love to see the other films that Bob Hope and Paulette Goddard made together.

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6 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I love The Cat and the Canary.  It's such a fun film.  I'd love to see the other films that Bob Hope and Paulette Goddard made together.

Speedy, if you love Cat and the Canary then you have to see Ghost Breakers, the followup reunion that Hope and Goddard made right afterward. If anything Ghost has far more eerie atmosphere (terrific sets of a haunted castle, with wonderful photography and musical accompaniment). The "horror" aspects of the film, which includes a zombie, are played for thrills, too, not cheap laughs, making the film all the more effective. Hope and Goddard have great chemistry and are one of my favourite screen teams in this film. She really was a charmer.

ghost-breakers1.jpg

 

 

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I have to admit I do like the way Rooney always stood up for Flynn after the ridiculous rumors about Flynn being a Nazi spy started circulating around. So Rooney did have his good points. 

It's unfortunate though that he seemed to be clueless about just how offensive his portrait of Mr. Yunioshi in BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S really was.

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3 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I really wish Jezebel had been shot in color.  I think Bette's scandalous red dress in a sea of white (I think white was what she was expected to wear) would have had more of an impact.  

I feel the opposite....even with the B&W quality to it I can see through it and know the color of the dress is red and that's the brilliance of it.

JEZEBEL has always been one of my favorites anyway. Julie was the pre-cursor to Scarlett O'Hara, and while both women could be very self-centered and selfish when they wanted to be they could also be sacrificing and strong when the occasion called for it.

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There Goes My Heart (1938) - Routine romantic comedy from United Artists, producer Hal Roach, and director Norman Z. McLeod. Bored and sheltered rich girl Joan Butterfield (Virginia Bruce) sneaks off of her luxury yacht home where her grandfather and guardian Cyrus (Claude Gillingwater) has commanded she remain. She ends up rooming with a wacky girl she meets, Peggy (Patsy Kelly), who also gets her a job at a department store: Butterfield's, the flagship store of the chain owned by her family. Meanwhile, newspaper reporter Bill Spencer (Fredric March) is tasked with finding the reclusive and elusive Miss Butterfield for an article exclusive, and when the two meet, the inevitable romantic sparks ignite. Also featuring Alan Mowbray, Eugene Pallette, Nancy Carroll, Arthur Lake, Etienne Girardot, Robert Armstrong, Irving Pichel, J. Farrell MacDonald, Marjorie Main, Irving Bacon, and Harry Langdon.

The by-the-numbers script and uninspired direction are boosted a bit by the good cast, especially any scene with Patsy Kelly. I also liked seeing former major film stars Carroll and Langdon in small roles. The movie earned an Oscar nomination for Best Score (Marvin Hatley). (6/10)

Source: TCM.

theregoesmyheart1938_92761_678x381_08302

patsy_kelly___there_goes_my_heart.jpg

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6 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Rooney is absolutely atrocious in Breakfast at Tiffany's, a film that I otherwise enjoy.  I do not like Rooney's scenes however.  I know Rooney's character, Mr. Yunioshi, is in Truman Capote's original story and he's supposed to be Holly Golightly's exasperated Japanese landlord.  Rooney does the exasperated landlord bit well, it's just the yellow faced, stereotypical caricature that is cringe-worthy.  I would expect something like this in the propaganda films of the 1940s, or even in the Looney Tunes shorts from that era, but I feel that by 1961, during the Civil Rights Era no less, that society would have progressed beyond this representation.  

If Blake Edwards really wanted Rooney in the film, he could have used some creative license and just made Rooney the irritated, Caucasian, landlord and left the yellow face, buck teeth and thick glasses out of it.  Edwards already took license with Holly Golighty's character in order to better suit Audrey Hepburn's persona, why not do it with Yunioshi's character too? I don't know what Edwards or Rooney were thinking with this film.

I've read articles before where Edwards states that he regrets this portrayal.  Whereas, Rooney always states that he was disappointed that people felt this way about his performance. 

Holly's character isnt much different than the book (I was surprised when I read it as I thought it was toned down for the censors) The only major changes made were Paul and the ending.  I dont think any changes were made to suit Audrey.

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34 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Call me a superficial, but the main (only?) thing I remember about the differences between the book and movie versions of Holly Golightly is that the book Holly is blonde.

I could never quite get past that.

LOL I dont remember that part.....

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Trade Winds (1938) - Offbeat romantic comedy from United artists, producer Walter Wanger, and director Tay Garnett. After San Francisco society girl Kay Kerrigan (Joan Bennett) is involved in a murder, she fakes her death and heads to the Far East. When it's discovered that she's still alive, detective Sam Wye (Fredric March) is hired to track her down, and he's followed by uptight policeman Ben Blodgett (Ralph Bellamy) and Sam's secretary Jean (Ann Sothern). Sam quickly finds Kay, but they fall for each other, and try to outwit and outrun the authorities. Also featuring Thomas Mitchell, Sidney Blackmer, Robert Elliott, Joyce Compton, Richard Tucker, Dorothy Comingore, Wilma Francis, Patricia Farr, Ethelreda Leopold, Dorothy Tree, and Kay Linaker.

This movie threw me for a loop. It begins like a serious, moody proto-noir, but changes into a sharp-witted, unpredictable rom-com. March seems to have fun as the Lothario detective, and Bennett looks good transitioning from blonde to brunette. Sothern is terrific, and makes me wish I'd seen her in more. Ralph Bellamy gives the most outlandish performance, one of those that seem at first like a ridiculously overdone ham job, but about midway through the picture it clicks, and he ends up being the funniest person in the movie.  (7/10)

Source: TCM.

image84.jpg

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