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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

They did. 

 Several pages (5?6?) back in this thread someone mentioned it, It ran on the London stage a few years back and nothing much came of it...

At one point, there was even a Fritz Lang "Metropolis" musical in London, but didn't bear much resemblance to the original, and didn't even hold a candle to Giorgio Moroder's version.

(With Brian Blessed as Rotwang, who also did a great Baron in the London "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" musical.)

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now this is weird...

by a series of strange coincidences I was led to this episode of Biography about the life of IDA LUPINO today and- again, weird coincidence- it turns out that tomorrow (February 4th) is her birthday!

Maybe it's a sign Ida wanted me to post this.

OoogieBoogie, whatever- enjoy

(it's fun, but sad at the end, and it has some great clips of her work in THE LIGHT THAT FAILED.)

 

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I Just Watched, 31 Days of Oscar Edition, Post #2, 2/2

Limelight (United Artists, 1952) - This was my first time to see this film all the way through. It's both funny and poignant but verrry loooonng. Presumably, it did not win an Oscar for Best Editing. I feel like I need to read a Chaplin biography and learn what it is exactly that got him banned from the States for essentially 20 years. Red affiliations, I'm sure, but I don't know the specifics. If he was publicly declaring Communist manifestos, I've never seen or heard anything about that. Really my only exposure to his backstory is the Richard Attenborough biopic, which concentrates more on his earlier life. I do know from that movie and other sources about his predilection for very young girls. It's hard for me to watch this movie and not want to play amateur psychiatrist. His character Calvero, as written by Chaplin himself, is able to resist the temptation of young flesh in a way the real-life Chaplin clearly was not. I want to say maybe it was an idealized presentation of Chaplin himself the way he wanted to be, but I'm sure my assumptions are simplistic. Claire Boom, only 20 in this film, is not an actress I'm very familiar with, but she is admittedly lovely. She reminds me of Audrey Hepburn and got her movie start a couple of years ahead of Audrey, who often early in her career played innocent gamines who through the course of the movie gain life experience and become more sophisticated and a bit more world-weary by film's end, just like Bloom's character in this movie. At least in this film, however, Bloom is totally lacking in the humorous side Audrey would also give us. Looking at her imdb resume, I do see I've seen her in other things, though I didn't know who she was when I was watching them: Queen Mary in The King's Speech, Hera in Clash of the Titans, Martin Landau's clueless wife in Crimes and Misdemeanors, "The Wife" in The Outrage, Theodora in The Haunting, Katya in The Brothers Karamazov, Lady Anne in Olivier's Richard III. I mean, my gosh, I've been watching her for years. I just didn't know it. Seeing Sydney Chaplin in a prominent role makes me wonder which Chaplin son it was Brando said Chaplin was so verbally abusive to on the set of The Countess from Hong Kong. Sydney Chaplin would have been middle-aged by then, so I'm wondering if it was a younger son. But Sydney was in that movie as well, so maybe it was him. I guess my biggest gripe about this movie is that it telegraphs its ending so thoroughly practically from the first frame. I was dreading the ending right from the beginning because it was so obvious to me that (Spoiler Alert!) Calvero was going to die. Thereza was so unfailingly devoted to him, even after he ran away, that the only way to get her into that age-appropriate relationship Chaplin probably thought the audience demanded was to kill off his character.

Fiddler on the Roof (United Artists, 1971) - I just haven't warmed up to this movie very much after repeated viewings. I suppose the numbers and the choreography are just as impressive as any lavish production from MGM's Golden Age, but the setting and the costumes and the plethora of characters I just don't care about that much have always failed to capture my imagination. Musicals aren't my favorite genre to begin with, but if I have to watch one, I suppose I prefer the flash of swanky nightclubs and tuxedos and three-piece suits and dresses and evening gowns to poor Russian Jewish milkmen living in the middle of nowhere in 1900. I guess I'm a snob. There is some nice social messaging, and Topol brings a nice subtlety to the lead role. They say in the promo TCM often shows that Zero Mostel originated the role on stage, but Norman Jewison wanted somebody less in your face for the movie, and I think that was a wise choice. I like Mostel, but he knew only one approach to acting, grand and scenery-chewing. I didn't know that John Williams had won an Oscar for "scoring adaption and original song score" for this film. Is that a category that's still in use? Prince won the same award for the Purple Rain movie as I recall, accepting in full Prince regalia, and the Beatles also won that award for Let It Be. And none of of the Beatles actually showed up. Quincy Jones accepted on their behalf. But if it's an award that's still being given, I have no idea who's won it in the last 20 years.

Yankee Doodle Dandy (Warner Bros., 1942) - I always get a kick out of Cagney's dance style, especially the performance of the title number. All that crazy hunch-walking with long strides, coupled with dramatic spins and kicks so high, it's a wonder he doesn't fall on his Irish-American arse. I wonder what someone like Fred Astaire thought of Cagney's dancing, if he ever commented on it. Cagney seems to me to have not had any classical (or any?) training. He just does what comes naturally to him, and it works. I love that scene where Joan Leslie first meets Cagney in his makeup and thinks he's a hundred years old and about to go on a date with a 17-year-old! That makes me laugh every time. There are other nice scenes, like when Cagney worries needlessly about having given Leslie's show part away to Fay Templeton. And when Cagney gently kisses S.Z. Sakall on his hat, and Sakall looks up, uncertain what's just happened. And when young Cohan's parents decide a good beating is just what their son needs and debate about where is the best place to strike him! Nice casting bits with Cagney's real-life sister playing his movie sister and Eddie Foy, Jr. playing his father. One weird moment: what the heck was the bit with the number early on in the movie where six-year-old Josie Cohan apparently pulls up her dress and flahses the audience while her parents look on adoringly? We don't see anything, but still ... that certainly wouldn't fly today.

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34 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

 

Yankee Doodle Dandy (Warner Bros., 1942) - I always get a kick out of Cagney's dance style, especially the performance of the title number. All that crazy hunch-walking with long strides, coupled with dramatic spins and kicks so high, it's a wonder he doesn't fall on his Irish-American arse. I wonder what someone like Fred Astaire thought of Cagney's dancing, if he ever commented on it. Cagney seems to me to have not had any classical (or any?) training. He just does what comes naturally to him, and it works. I love that scene where Joan Leslie first meets Cagney in his makeup and thinks he's a hundred years old and about to go on a date with a 17-year-old! That makes me laugh every time. There are other nice scenes, like when Cagney worries needlessly about having given Leslie's show part away to Fay Templeton. And when Cagney gently kisses S.Z. Sakall on his hat, and Sakall looks up, uncertain what's just happened. And when young Cohan's parents decide a good beating is just what their son needs and debate about where is the best place to strike him! Nice casting bits with Cagney's real-life sister playing his movie sister and Eddie Foy, Jr. playing his father. One weird moment: what the heck was the bit with the number early on in the movie where six-year-old Josie Cohan apparently pulls up her dress and flahses the audience while her parents look on adoringly? We don't see anything, but still ... that certainly wouldn't fly today.

YANKEE DOODLE DANDY is definitely one of Cagney's best, and the role he was most proud of. He always did much prefer to be remembered as a song-and-dance man rather than for his gangster roles (I love him either way myself).

And yes the scene where he's pulling Leslie's leg about his age is hilarious. I also love the scene, during Cohan's elder years when he's retired to the farm, when a group of teens stop by with car trouble and he's irked when they failed to recognize him. It pumps him up to leave retirement and go back on stage.

I love all the musical numbers too, especially the HARRIGAN song and the patriotic numbers on stage.

I read somewhere though that his winning the Oscar for YANKEE DOODLE DANDY actually wasn't a popular one, at least with the critics. I believe one of Cagney's competitors for the Oscar that year was Gary Cooper for THE PRIDE OF THE YANKEES. Cooper had won the previous year for SERGEANT YORK, otherwise he might have won over Cagney.

I think Cagney's Oscar was well deserved, he puts so much energy and work into the role. And of course the rest of the cast is brilliant as well, and that includes Leslie and Walter Huston as Cohan's father.

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50 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

I Just Watched, 31 Days of Oscar Edition, Post #2, 2/2

Limelight (United Artists, 1952) - This was my first time to see this film all the way through. It's both funny and poignant but verrry loooonng. Presumably, it did not win an Oscar for Best Editing. I feel like I need to read a Chaplin biography and learn what it is exactly that got him banned from the States for essentially 20 years. Red affiliations, I'm sure, but I don't know the specifics. If he was publicly declaring Communist manifestos, I've never seen or heard anything about that. Really my only exposure to his backstory is the Richard Attenborough biopic, which concentrates more on his earlier life. I do know from that movie and other sources about his predilection for very young girls. It's hard for me to watch this movie and not want to play amateur psychiatrist. His character Calvero, as written by Chaplin himself, is able to resist the temptation of young flesh in a way the real-life Chaplin clearly was not. I want to say maybe it was an idealized presentation of Chaplin himself the way he wanted to be, but I'm sure my assumptions are simplistic. Claire Boom, only 20 in this film, is not an actress I'm very familiar with, but she is admittedly lovely. She reminds me of Audrey Hepburn and got her movie start a couple of years ahead of Audrey, who often early in her career played innocent gamines who through the course of the movie gain life experience and become more sophisticated and a bit more world-weary by film's end, just like Bloom's character in this movie. At least in this film, however, Bloom is totally lacking in the humorous side Audrey would also give us. Looking at her imdb resume, I do see I've seen her in other things, though I didn't know who she was when I was watching them: Queen Mary in The King's Speech, Hera in Clash of the Titans, Martin Landau's clueless wife in Crimes and Misdemeanors, "The Wife" in The Outrage, Theodora in The Haunting, Katya in The Brothers Karamazov, Lady Anne in Olivier's Richard III. I mean, my gosh, I've been watching her for years. I just didn't know it. Seeing Sydney Chaplin in a prominent role makes me wonder which Chaplin son it was Brando said Chaplin was so verbally abusive to on the set of The Countess from Hong Kong. Sydney Chaplin would have been middle-aged by then, so I'm wondering if it was a younger son. But Sydney was in that movie as well, so maybe it was him. I guess my biggest gripe about this movie is that it telegraphs its ending so thoroughly practically from the first frame. I was dreading the ending right from the beginning because it was so obvious to me that (Spoiler Alert!) Calvero was going to die. Thereza was so unfailingly devoted to him, even after he ran away, that the only way to get her into that age-appropriate relationship Chaplin probably thought the audience demanded was to kill off his character.

Fiddler on the Roof (United Artists, 1971) - I just haven't warmed up to this movie very much after repeated viewings. I suppose the numbers and the choreography are just as impressive as any lavish production from MGM's Golden Age, but the setting and the costumes and the plethora of characters I just don't care about that much have always failed to capture my imagination. Musicals aren't my favorite genre to begin with, but if I have to watch one, I suppose I prefer the flash of swanky nightclubs and tuxedos and three-piece suits and dresses and evening gowns to poor Russian Jewish milkmen living in the middle of nowhere in 1900. I guess I'm a snob. There is some nice social messaging, and Topol brings a nice subtlety to the lead role. They say in the promo TCM often shows that Zero Mostel originated the role on stage, but Norman Jewison wanted somebody less in your face for the movie, and I think that was a wise choice. I like Mostel, but he knew only one approach to acting, grand and scenery-chewing. I didn't know that John Williams had won an Oscar for "scoring adaption and original song score" for this film. Is that a category that's still in use? Prince won the same award for the Purple Rain movie as I recall, accepting in full Prince regalia, and the Beatles also won that award for Let It Be. And none of of the Beatles actually showed up. Quincy Jones accepted on their behalf. But if it's an award that's still being given, I have no idea who's won it in the last 20 years.

Yankee Doodle Dandy (Warner Bros., 1942) - I always get a kick out of Cagney's dance style, especially the performance of the title number. All that crazy hunch-walking with long strides, coupled with dramatic spins and kicks so high, it's a wonder he doesn't fall on his Irish-American arse. I wonder what someone like Fred Astaire thought of Cagney's dancing, if he ever commented on it. Cagney seems to me to have not had any classical (or any?) training. He just does what comes naturally to him, and it works. I love that scene where Joan Leslie first meets Cagney in his makeup and thinks he's a hundred years old and about to go on a date with a 17-year-old! That makes me laugh every time. There are other nice scenes, like when Cagney worries needlessly about having given Leslie's show part away to Fay Templeton. And when Cagney gently kisses S.Z. Sakall on his hat, and Sakall looks up, uncertain what's just happened. And when young Cohan's parents decide a good beating is just what their son needs and debate about where is the best place to strike him! Nice casting bits with Cagney's real-life sister playing his movie sister and Eddie Foy, Jr. playing his father. One weird moment: what the heck was the bit with the number early on in the movie where six-year-old Josie Cohan apparently pulls up her dress and flahses the audience while her parents look on adoringly? We don't see anything, but still ... that certainly wouldn't fly today.

Hey, I saw Limelight for the first time yesterday too. What a beautiful film! Seeing Chaplin and Keaton perform together was good and the ending was so beautiful. Ranks up there with Modern Times for me.

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1 hour ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

YANKEE DOODLE DANDY is definitely one of Cagney's best, and the role he was most proud of. He always did much prefer to be remembered as a song-and-dance man rather than for his gangster roles (I love him either way myself).

And yes the scene where he's pulling Leslie's leg about his age is hilarious. I also love the scene, during Cohan's elder years when he's retired to the farm, when a group of teens stop by with car trouble and he's irked when they failed to recognize him. It pumps him up to leave retirement and go back on stage.

I love all the musical numbers too, especially the HARRIGAN song and the patriotic numbers on stage.

I read somewhere though that his winning the Oscar for YANKEE DOODLE DANDY actually wasn't a popular one, at least with the critics. I believe one of Cagney's competitors for the Oscar that year was Gary Cooper for THE PRIDE OF THE YANKEES. Cooper had won the previous year for SERGEANT YORK, otherwise he might have won over Cagney.

I think Cagney's Oscar was well deserved, he puts so much energy and work into the role. And of course the rest of the cast is brilliant as well, and that includes Leslie and Walter Huston as Cohan's father.

Hix Stix Nix Pix

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On 1/30/2018 at 5:27 PM, LawrenceA said:

If only the script [Four's a Crowd] were funny rather than overly caffeinated, I might have, too.  (5/10)

Lawrence, I don't ever remember seeing this word characterize a movie but I like it. What's left to decide is whether it has the cream or the sugar (or both), eh? Olivia looks so cute in the poster.

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"ANTS" (aka: "It Happened At Lakewood Manor") on Svengoolie last night.  Last saw it back in '77 when the TV movie premiered.  Never one to pay too much attention to credits back then( and after seeing LINDA DAY GEORGE and SUZANNE SOMERS names stopped anyway ;)  ) I never knew the old lady was MYRNA LOY.  

Looking back, I still wonder how they managed to pull it off.  There WAS to my knowledge, NO CGI at the time, and laugh now wondering if they had to hire an "ant wrangler" to keep all of them in line. :D  I also didn't( at the time) realize it was BRIAN DENNEHEY that was the heavy set cop, as I really can't say WHEN I became aware of him as an actor.  As TV horror flicks go, it was OK.

Sepiatone

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I've been busy lately, so I haven't been watching much, but I recently rewatched Topper Takes a Trip followed by It Happened Tomorrow.

Let me dispense quickly with Topper Takes a Trip. In my opinion, it's the weakest of the three Topper films. It recycles considerable footage from the first Topper film as background information. I guess that's a way of getting Cary Grant in there, even though he didn't shoot any new scenes for Topper Takes a Trip. (I bet they used his face in the advertising, too. If I had paid money to see this film, thinking Cary Grant was in it, I would have felt quite disappointed!) Constance Bennett stars as the ghost of Mrs. Kerby. She had some amusing moments, but I personally think she lacked the sparkle and sass of Joan Blondell, who starred in Topper Returns (my favorite of the three entries). The only scene at which I laughed out loud was that of the fortune-seeker on the beach, trying to woo Mrs. Topper while the ghost of Mrs. Kerby thwarts him with unseen hands at every turn. She strips his trunks off him while he's lying under the sand, then torments him with a giant beach ball that inexplicably keeps rolling over him while Mrs. Topper squeaks with alarm. So yes, that was funny, but if I had to choose one of the Topper films never to see again, it would be this one. Billie Burke, as usual, is a scene-stealer, but Alan Mowbray also made a worthy contribution here as the butler Wilkins.

The other movie, It Happened Tomorrow, was much more interesting. Almost the entire movie is told in flashback, as the reminiscences of a couple celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary. Flashing back to the late 1800s, we see Dick Powell as a young reporter who comes into possession of a few newspapers that have tomorrow's news a day early. He uses this advance knowledge to become a success and woo his girl (Linda Darnell). They have several hair-raising adventures, and the girl's father, a stage illusionist who uses his daughter in a fake clairvoyance demonstration, at first does not approve of the relationship. But Dick Powell's character wins the day, and fortunately, the news of his untimely death proves to be a reporting error. (You know this from the outset, since the story is told in flashback, but it's still quite exciting.) 

I think the movie would have been more interesting (to me) if the story had NOT been told in flashback and had been set in modern times. Without the opening scenes from the present time, letting us know that the main characters survived, the ending would have been more suspenseful. I wonder if the writers/producers had a possible sequel in mind, since they left the first half of the 20th century open to play with in a subsequent film. It would have been a fun history exercise to choose the most interesting day to gain advance knowledge of. On the other hand, this movie was made in 1944, and there was a lot of war news at that time that no one would want a day early. Maybe the 19th century setting made the story comfortably far from those grim events.

René Clair directed this, and I found it similar in many ways to his previous film, I Married a Witch--both films make use of a supernatural element, madcap adventures, broadly drawn characters, and a light touch. However, many people consider I Married a Witch to be a screwball comedy, but I don't see how one could squeeze It Happened Tomorrow into that category. (Perhaps if it had been set in the 30s or 40s...)

 

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17 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

YANKEE DOODLE DANDY is definitely one of Cagney's best, and the role he was most proud of. He always did much prefer to be remembered as a song-and-dance man rather than for his gangster roles (I love him either way myself).

And yes the scene where he's pulling Leslie's leg about his age is hilarious. I also love the scene, during Cohan's elder years when he's retired to the farm, when a group of teens stop by with car trouble and he's irked when they failed to recognize him. It pumps him up to leave retirement and go back on stage.

I love all the musical numbers too, especially the HARRIGAN song and the patriotic numbers on stage.

I read somewhere though that his winning the Oscar for YANKEE DOODLE DANDY actually wasn't a popular one, at least with the critics. I believe one of Cagney's competitors for the Oscar that year was Gary Cooper for THE PRIDE OF THE YANKEES. Cooper had won the previous year for SERGEANT YORK, otherwise he might have won over Cagney.

I think Cagney's Oscar was well deserved, he puts so much energy and work into the role. And of course the rest of the cast is brilliant as well, and that includes Leslie and Walter Huston as Cohan's father.

Yankee Doodle Dandy is an amiable flag waving old fashioned tribute to the stage and song and dance men (Cohan in particular, of course) of another era. Cohan apparently saw the film shortly before his death and gave it his nod of approval.

Having said that, while I like this (too lengthy) musical bio it is simply not one of the Cagney films that I would most prefer to watch. I have always found this flag waving entertainment to be amusing but overrated.

Nor do I think that, Oscar win or not, this film shows off Cagney's dramatic range to the same degree as any of a number of other key roles in his career, such as Rocky Sullivan in Angels With Dirty Faces (a marvelous, compulsively watchable portrayal with the actor at his peak as a man child) or the cold bloodedly psychotic Cody Jarrett in White Heat. I also much prefer to watch the sentimental sweetness that Cagney brought to that turn-of-the-century charmer The Strawberry Blonde over Yankee, as well.

Well, I guess I'm in the minority here, and certainly Cagney himself would not have agreed, I suppose, since he called the Cohan role the favourite of his career. But keep in mind that Cagney picked that role because he regarded himself as a song-and-dance man first, an actor second. There's no question that Yankee Doodle Dandy showed off his musical talents more than any other film.

But, as an actor, Cagney gets on my list as one of the greats of the studio system days because of those other films that I named above, among a number of others. Yankee Doodle Dandy is more interesting for showing off his versatility as a song and dance man than anything else.

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16 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Yankee Doodle Dandy is an amiable flag waving old fashioned tribute to the stage and song and dance men (Cohan in particular, of course) of another era. Cohan apparently saw the film shortly before his death and gave it his nod of approval.

Having said that, while I like this (too lengthy) musical bio it is simply not one of the Cagney films that I would most prefer to watch. I have always found this flag waving entertainment to be amusing but overrated.

Nor do I think that, Oscar win or not, this film shows off Cagney's dramatic range to the same degree as any of a number of other key roles in his career, such as Rocky Sullivan in Angels With Dirty Faces (a marvelous, compulsively watchable portrayal with the actor at his peak as a man child) or the cold bloodedly psychotic Cody Jarrett in White Heat. I also much prefer to watch the sentimental sweetness that Cagney brought to that turn-of-the-century charmer The Strawberry Blonde over Yankee, as well.

Well, I guess I'm in the minority here, and certainly Cagney himself would not have approved, I suppose, since he called the Cohan role the favourite of his career. But keep in mind that Cagney picked that role because he regarded himself as a song-and-dance man first, an actor second. There's no question that Yankee Doodle Dandy showed off his musical talents more than any other film. But, as an actor, Cagney gets on my list as one of the greats of the studio system days for those other films than I named above, among others, not the Cohan film, in particular.

Cagney probably would be disappointed you don't regard his performance in YANKEE DOODLE DANDY very highly. But if you don't like a movie or performance very much, then you don't and that's all there is too it.

You might not be in the minority as much as you think. I know quite a few people who also didn't care for YANKEE DOODLE DANDY or for Cagney's performance. What can I say, you can't please all the people all the time....

It's already been discussed to death, even though the Academy at the time found it a bit too dark for its taste to nominate,  but I personally think his Cody Jarrett in WHITE HEAT was THE defining performance of his career (I know he'd probably be ready to slam a grapefruit in my face for that view, lol). 

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47 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

It's already been discussed to death, even though the Academy at the time found it a bit too dark for its taste to nominate,  but I personally think his Cody Jarrett in WHITE HEAT was THE defining performance of his career (I know he'd probably be ready to slam a grapefruit in my face for that view, lol). 

I sent two letters to Cagney. I can't recall exactly what I wrote in either one specifically, of course, but I know that the first was a general appraisal of his career while the second, if memory serves me correctly, primarily concentrated upon White Heat. I recall writing about his performance in the prison cafeteria scene. Cagney responded to the first letter with a small note but to the White Heat letter there was only a stoney silence.

It was later that I read he was not a big fan of his gangster roles. If the second letter had been about his musicals or Morgan horses it might have received more of a response, I suppose.

ff8d0de09918cd6776b4a4b508d77b07--morgan

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I Just Watched 31 Days of Oscar Edition, Post #3, 2/3

A River Runs through It (Columbia, 1992) - (Spoiler alerts!) Well, TCM doesn't get to show many Brad Pitt movies, so I'm sure they're glad they can get their hands on this one. While the two romantic leads, Craig Sheffer and cute-as-a-button 22-year-old Emily Lloyd, have been forgotten, you can just see Pitt's white-hot ascent to stardom taking place in this movie, along with his other early performances. And what a part for him. It runs the gamut - his character is always the most dashing, charming guy in the room but also vulnerable, fiercely proud and deeply troubled. This movie is very watchable and re-watchable; I've probably seen it close to a dozen times. But I'm still not sure I get what the message is supposed to be. Tom Skerritt's preacher tries to teach his sons to find grace and to reconnect with their inner selves after dealing with the chaos of the material world by losing themselves in the rhythms of fly fishing. And Pitt's younger son absorbs the lesson and surpasses the teacher, becoming a transcendent genius of the art. But he doesn't learn any of the reverend's other lessons and is doomed for tragedy, partially bringing that doom upon himself by refusing offers of financial help or the chance to relocate to another city where his enemies would probably never find him. Sheffer's older son, on the other hand, is only an okay fly fisherman but is more in tune with his father's plan for navigating life otherwise, and he ends up with a beautiful wife and children and a fulfilling job and happiness. So, how important is fly fishing to all this exactly? Everyone in the cast is great, especially Skerritt and Brenda Blethyn as the parents. I would like to give special attention to Nicole Burdette, who plays the small but moving role of Mabel. She could have practically had her own movie, but instead has to show in just a couple of scenes what it was like to be Native American in Missoula in the 1920s, not much different than what it was like to be black in the Deep South at the same time. Mabel has no patience for intolerance, and she's rowdy and out of control, but she also wants to sublimate her identity with an Anglicized name and considers bobbing her hair to look more like the white flappers. We sense she's had a hard life, but she also beams like a little girl when Lloyd's Jessie tells her how pretty her hair is. This actress' imdb biography is whisper-thin. I don't even know if she's actually Native American. You still saw white people getting parts like that sometimes even as late as the early '90s. But she does a great job. By the way, TCM has clearly been using the same print of this film for 10 years or more, because a line where Pitt's character uses the F-word near the very end of the movie is dubbed out. Every time they show it, you see Pitt's lips moving but there's an artificial silence imposed on the soundtrack.

Bound for Glory (United Artists, 1976) - It's definitely time for a new Woody Guthrie biopic, because a man as fascinating and important as Guthrie deserves better than this funereally paced snoozefest that offers no interesting revelations about its subject other than maybe he liked women and used to live in the Dust Bowl. I need to see more about the impact of his music and his politics. I think there's a really good movie to be made, but this just isn't it. The Oscar-winning cinematography of Haskell Wexler, he of the very long and accomplished career, is about the only thing to really recommend. I suppose David Carradine is all right in the lead role. Some posters in another thread were recently confusing him with his brother Keith, much to my bewilderment. Obviously those people didn't grow up on reruns of Kung-Fu like I did (but hey, I recently got Charles Boyer and Charles Laughton mixed up, so who am I to judge?).

The Hustler (20th Century Fox, 1961) - This film is at the crossroads of the more cinema verite style that would become increasingly common in the '60s with one foot still in the past - some of the dialogue still strikes me as the kind of speechifying one would see in an older movie. I pass no judgment; I like both styles, but having both in one movie makes for a slightly uneven mix. Paul Newman I tended to find a little too theatrical and stagey at this stage in his career, though he has charisma coming out the ears. He does that same cracking himself up with some private joke laugh that he does in Cool Hand Luke. He only really became a great actor in the 70s or even the 80s, in my opinion. You're not 15 minutes into the movie before a Fast Eddie-Minnesota Fats showdown is underway. There's sort of an emotional letdown after the intensity of that early highpoint. George C. Scott is electric. He really hit the ground running, nabbing Supporting Actor noms for Anatomy of a Murder and this film early in his career. But the story arc of poor Piper Laurie makes this film a tough and slightly unpleasant watch, as good as she is. Watching this film again helps give some resonance to the sequel The Color of Money, which I also saw again recently, in which Newman's Eddie (and anyone who's seen the original film) can see many of the same traits in the Tom Cruise character that he himself had in the first movie. Oh, and special mention of Myron McCormick, who plays Fast Eddie's first manager, whom I've just learned about by reading that new book about Henry Fonda and Jimmy Stewart. During the Depression, McCormick shared a one-bedroom apartment with Fonda, Stewart and Josh Logan in Manhattan and was the only one of the four getting steady work, in radio. He had his two highest-profile roles at the very end of his career: this film and No Time for Sergeants. Unfortunately, he was dead at the age of 54 only a year after making this movie.

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

I sent two letters to Cagney. I can't recall exactly what I wrote in either one specifically, of course, but I know that the first was a general appraisal of his career while the second, if memory serves me correctly, primarily concentrated upon White Heat. I recall writing about his performance in the prison cafeteria scene. Cagney responded to the first letter with a small note but to the White Heat letter there was only a stoney silence.

It was later that I read he was not a big fan of his gangster roles. If the second letter had been about his musicals or Morgan horses it might have received more of a response, I suppose.

ff8d0de09918cd6776b4a4b508d77b07--morgan

Sorry to hear you got the cold shoulder regarding WHITE HEAT. :( 

 

 

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13 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

"ANTS" (aka: "It Happened At Lakewood Manor") on Svengoolie last night.  Last saw it back in '77 when the TV movie premiered.  Never one to pay too much attention to credits back then( and after seeing LINDA DAY GEORGE and SUZANNE SOMERS names stopped anyway ;)  ) I never knew the old lady was MYRNA LOY.  

Looking back, I still wonder how they managed to pull it off.  There WAS to my knowledge, NO CGI at the time, and laugh now wondering if they had to hire an "ant wrangler" to keep all of them in line. :D  I also didn't( at the time) realize it was BRIAN DENNEHEY that was the heavy set cop, as I really can't say WHEN I became aware of him as an actor.  As TV horror flicks go, it was OK.

Sepiatone

I watched the same movie last night - - there were a number of very good actors in this movie.

My question would be WHY did they manage to pull it off? It was one of the most boring disaster-terror films I've ever seen. It made me feel nostalgic for "The Swarm"-- at least the bees made noise and scared you a little bit when they showed up. LOL

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3 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

I watched the same movie last night - - there were a number of very good actors in this movie.

My question would be WHY did they manage to pull it off? It was one of the most boring disaster-terror films I've ever seen. It made me feel nostalgic for "The Swarm"-- at least the bees made noise and scared you a little bit when they showed up. LOL

If you remember it from '77, then you remember that it was never about why you made a TV-movie, there just had to BE one for Tuesday or Wednesday nights on ABC.  (Sundays were for the real Hollywood films.)

Putting it that way, I guess that would make them the equivalent of those "Netflix exclusives" that we laugh off or ignore today, but back then, a TV-movie was something you could sit down and watch.  They weren't good, but they were ON.

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The Cloverfield Paradox (2018) - Science fiction thriller from Paramount Pictures, Netflix, and director Julius Onah. In the near future when Earth's energy supplies have run so low that wars are imminent, an international contingent of scientists are at work on an orbiting space station trying to find new energy sources using a particle accelerator. They've been at it for 2 years, and only have enough energy left for two more attempts, when something goes wrong and the station is transported...somewhere else. They now have to figure out where and how to get back before it's too late. Meanwhile, their mishap has also had an unimaginable effect on things back at home. The cats includes Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Daniel Bruhl, Elizabeth Debicki, David Oyelowo, Zhang Ziyi, John Ortiz, Chris O'Dowd, Aksel Hennie, and Roger Davies.

Just like the previous "sequel", this was an unrelated film (entitled God Particle) before being re-christened with the Cloverfield moniker and having scenes added and reshot to make it part of the series. The seams are just as easy to see here as they were in the last film, with the majority of the movie being a standalone hard science fiction story set on a space station with the crew trying to solve their dilemma while dealing with the laws of physics collapsing around them. This part of the film is okay, well shot and expensive-looking, with decent performances from the eclectic cast. The "Cloverfield" scenes, set back on Earth, involve the spouse of one of the astronauts dealing with the aftermath of the rampaging monster from the first film, although the creature is only marginally visible here. These sequences look cheap, and don't mesh well either by looks or by narrative flow. This is the least of the films thus far in my opinion, but science fiction fans may wish to take a look if nothing better is available.  (6/10)

Source: Netflix.

Cloverfield-Paradox-Cast.jpg 

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4 minutes ago, EricJ said:

Putting it that way, I guess that would make them the equivalent of those "Netflix exclusives" that we laugh off or ignore today, 

 

5 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The Cloverfield Paradox (2018) - Science fiction thriller from Paramount Pictures, Netflix, and director Julius Onah. 

(Yeah, that was the one I was thinking of....Am I that transparent?  :unsure: )

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Thanks for that review of the CLOVERFIELD PARADOX...

I’m viewing the message boards on my phone right now, which is kind of like building a ship in a bottle Because everything is teensy tiny. I have to admit at first glance I thought the name GUGU MBATHA-RAW (sp?)was MARTHA RAYE, And I thought they had done some kind of hologram **** to bring her back.

In the opposite reaction to Prince and the Timberlake Super Bowl performance, I have to say I’m very disappointed that this is not the case.

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Last night I watched A Guy Named Joe. I had seen it before, I would say more than 10 years ago and maybe one other time since then. What I remembered was a very patriotic and sentimental film, and this impression was reinforced by my latest viewing. The story concerns a WWII flier who is killed in action, and his subsequent observations of and attempts to influence, from beyond the grave, what happens to those he left behind, most notably his grieving fiancée (Irene Dunne). What I found in the movie this time was more appreciation of the fiancée's process of grieving and letting go.

There certainly is a lot of patriotism in the movie, and as sentimental love stories go you could find better. But the three stars (Spencer Tracy as the deceased flier, Irene Dunne, and Van Johnson as the new love) are all great actors, and they brought some subtle human details to their performances. The screenplay, although at times overbearingly patriotic, had touching moments. One was when the new man, whom Tracy has pegged as a typical wolf on the make, performs an act of sensitivity and kindness toward a fellow serviceman. The serviceman is desperately lonely for home, and Johnson's character places a call to his mother for him. The serviceman's reaction when he hears his mom's voice on the phone had me in tears. The other beautiful thing about that moment was that as a viewer you begin to see that Van Johnson's character is a man of quality and there may be hope for Irene.

Although this movie is pure corn, I would put it on the list of movies that could be healing to people grieving a loss, whether due to death or some other reason. Moreover, you get to hang out with Spencer Tracy, Irene Dunne, and Van Johnson, which ain't bad.

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16 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

I Just Watched 31 Days of Oscar Edition, Post #3, 2/3

 Some posters in another thread were recently confusing him with his brother Keith, much to my bewilderment. Obviously those people didn't grow up on reruns of Kung-Fu like I did (but hey, I recently got Charles Boyer and Charles Laughton mixed up, so who am I to judge?).

you are correct, i have never seen an episode of KUNG-FU. i've actually missed out on A LOT of 70s culture in general. (it was made in the 70's, right?)

thanks for the review of BOUND FOR GLORY.

For the record tho, I STILL SAY the Carradine brothers look alike and BRIANS Aherne AND Donlevey bore a resemblance of a sort to one another.

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I vaguely remember KUNG FU, and I have always been able to tell them apart but I can completely understand why a lot of people get confused with who is who among the Carradine brothers, particularly between Keith and David. The resemblance really is that strong.

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I vaguely remember KUNG FU, and I have always been able to tell them apart but I can completely understand why a lot of people get confused with who is who among the Carradine brothers, particularly between Keith and David. The resemblance really is that strong.

And see, I don't see that at all. I can see how Robert and Keith look alike, both with thin, sharp features, but David always looked adopted to me.

David

tve2751-19720222-1308.jpg

Keith

Keith_Carradine-e1338434706580.jpg

Robert

72c7e72dbf35dbbe5d8a26e29c4eff9d--actor-

and dad John for good measure

people_3229.jpg_223_281_2

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