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2 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Call me crazy, but I can still see the resemblance between all three brothers (however, I will admit, after seeing these photos, the family resemblance between Keith and Robert is a bit more obvious).

Part of is that David has a different mother, whereas Keith and Robert share the same mother. Check out this convoluted family tree:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carradine_family

Family reunions must have been something.

Keith's daughter Martha Plimpton is also an actress.

53773f0d2fd9fb80af06b9f9d62f8fa4.jpg

As is Robert's daughter Ever Carradine.

ever-carradine-1.jpg

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i'm gonna play loose with the rules here and let you all know about something I just READ, but i think it fits in with the filmic nature of things here.

HOLLYWOOD by CHARLES BUKOWSKI

This was my first BUKOWSKI and I would not have likely read it if not for the fact that two weeks ago I went to a local downtown used bookstore and the employee of the bookstore got all "Judy Attitudey" when I tried to look at a copy that was on a shelf SHE WAS SITTING IN FRONT OF. (She wouldn't move)

I literally went right around the corner to the local library where they had a copy.

(i did fight the urge to return and do a little "neener neener neener" dance in front of her with my FREE COPY.)

I say i would likely not have read it as it is a subject matter i usually stay away from- HOLLYWOOD AND THE CREATIVE PROCESS- but honestly, it was SUCH A HOOT (like three guffaws a page for the first 50) and so BRILLIANTLY WRITTEN, it was hard to put down- and this i did not expect- but it's a book by a writer whose clear LOVE OF WRITING shines through to a contagious and inspiring degree.

the book is all about the processes of getting his script for BARFLY turned into a movie- his dealings with the various levels of Hollywood folks under some easily decoded psuedonyms- the guys behind Golan Globus productions, Barbet Schroeder, Faye Dunaway- most of whom he writes about with a great deal of understanding (Faye fans will especially dig this one!)

Bukowski would hate me for saying this, but it has the pacing and feel of a zany 1930's screwball comedy, just a delight of a book and i highly recommend it.

(sorry, this was a terrible review. but really, it's a great book!)

 

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Part of is that David has a different mother, whereas Keith and Robert share the same mother. Check out this convoluted family tree:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carradine_family

Family reunions must have been something.

Keith's daughter Martha Plimpton is also an actress.

53773f0d2fd9fb80af06b9f9d62f8fa4.jpg

As is Robert's daughter Ever Carradine.

ever-carradine-1.jpg

Martha looks so much like her dad.........

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The Silent Partner (1978) A bank teller Eliot Gould is held up at gun point by a Santa Claus (Christopher Plummer), during the holidays in Toronto. The robbery takes place after a large deposit is made. But he's anticipating the heist because of two things, a discarded withdrawal slip he found earlier with identical capitol "G's" that match a hand drawn sign he spots held by the same Santa Claus, and the fact that the Santa was going to rob the bank right after a large deposit was made by a local business man, but he was foiled in the earlier attempt by a small boy who attracted a lot of attention because wanted to tell Santa his Christmas list. 

Because the observant teller knows whats coming he devises a way to steal most of the money for himself while letting Santa get away with a portion.

Its a nice little cat and mouse game once the real thief figures out what happened and wants a cut of the loot. Susannah York, Céline Lomez and John Candy round out the rest of the cast  . 8/10

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AN ADDENDUM TO THE ADDENDUM AND THEN I SHUT UP, I PROMISE

If I did not make it clear in my initial review of HOLLYWOOD by CHARLES BUKOWSKI, I would NEVER have read this book except for the fact that the girl at the bookshop REALLY CHEESED ME OFF by not moving out of the way so that I could JUST get to it to check out the cover, SO when i found the copy in the library, i was FUELED BY SPITE to finish it even though it deals with SEVERAL subjects that I have a real aversion to thinking or reading about. Namely:

1. Alcoholism

2. The creative process

3. Screenwriting in general

4. the business of HOLLYWOOD

Again, I expected some sort of bitter "BURN IT ALL DOWN" tome, acrid and angry and dry heaving at the world. What I found instead was a hilarious and very affectionate tale from someone who cannot help but be likeable so clear are his gifts and his twin passions in life (writing and drinking.) he also respects the people he is writing about and really, no one (besides for some odd reason TOM JONES) comes off badly in this.

honestly, it's the most inspiring book i've read in a looooong time.

(so if you learn nothing else from these meanderings, besides you should read this book, learn that SPITE IS NOT NECESSARILY A BAD THING, IT MAY JUST BE THE FUEL YOU NEED RIGHT WHEN THE ENGINE IS STARTING TO TAP.)

 

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I Just Watched 31 Days of Oscar Edition, Post #4 - 2/4

Black Narcissus (Dist. in US by Universal, 1947) - Beautiful to look at it, but I'm not sure what it all means. Ben M. added on a PC postscript advising us to look at the movie through the lens of hindsight and context of the time it was made, given the stereotyped portrayals of the Indians, whom the David Farrar government agent character, even though he seems to be the most in touch with them, continually describes as "children". Well, the character played by Jean Simmons (18 when she made this picture, I think) is more a woman-child, exuding sex everywhere she goes in her wordless performance. And speaking of that government agent, it was almost a caricature of inflaming female desire with all those shorty-shorts he wore and unbuttoned shirts. And even in one scene when he's summoned by emergency, shirtless! I know it was an emergency, but he couldn't have taken 15 seconds to throw on a shirt? The convent I think has good intentions, but the Mother Superior saddles Deborah Kerr's sister with a team of borderline basket cases (and I guess in the case of Sister Ruth, all-out basket case). The nun who cares too much and maybe killed a child because of it. The world-weary nun who foolishly plants pretty flowers instead of food. The hypercritical nun. And of course Sister Ruth. It's probably a grand theme in British literature that immersion into the exotic can cause one to go balmy. A Passage to India, for example, has similar themes. That belltower assault near the end rivals Vertigo for intensity. I liked the flashback scenes of Kerr's pre-nun life. And Kerr and Farrar constantly bickering like an old married couple, and their tender goodbye, well, as tender as they could get, anyway. Oh, yeah, are there no horses in India? Everybody galloping around on those little ponies! Maybe that was some kind of status symbol with the nobility. I don't know. It was never explained.

Zorba the Greek (20th Century Fox, 1964) (Spoiler alerts!) After cautioning us that the portrayal of Indians in Black Narcissus was stereotyped, Ben M. didn't say ANYTHING about the portrayal of Cretans in this movie! They certainly come across as barbaric and medieval in their treatment of women. Look what happens to Irene Papas' poor Widow! This is only the second time I've seen this movie, and I'd forgotten how miserable it all is. I grew up always occasionally hearing about both the novel and the movie and what wonderful, uplifting themes they had of Zorba's views about how to live life. Still haven't read the book, but I'm not convinced from watching the movie. Athony Quinn's Zorba and the half-Englishman played by Alan Bates both suffer terrible personal loss, but just a few minutes later, that all seems to be forgotten about as we take a sharp left turn into slapstick comedy as Zorba's log-pulley system goes disastrously awry, presumably bringing financial ruin, but then the two men have some lamb and start dancing in the sand, and it's apparently supposed to be a happy ending. 

I found this interesting onlline essay regarding the Widow scene from someone who is apparently not a common watcher of classic films (he begins by saying learning the movie was two and a half hours and in black and white put him in a foul mood even before he started watching it, so clearly black and white is not something he's used to):

 http://deepaknair.com/2012/12/01/ok-here-are-my-thoughts-on-zorba-the-greek-after-sleeping-on-it/

The Song of Bernadette (20th Century Fox, 1943) - I'm not much for religious vision movies, which were earth-shattering events at one time, I guess, but I swear there was a run in like the '90s and the '00s where I was reading every other week about someone who had seen Jesus in a tortilla or Mary in a splatter of paint, and the uniqueness of each individual sighting dissipated. Jennifer Jones won an Oscar right out of the chute to begin her career. She's certainly earnest in this film, and she captivates your attention, but it's a pretty one-note performance. She has this vision, she believes in it, and she's unfailingly polite but resolute in the face of all disbelievers. And this goes on for more than two and a half hours. I was more interested in the machinations of the city government as they try to deal with what they perceive to be a crisis. Vincent Price is the best reason to watch this film. Although I also like Charles Bickford's highly practical priest.

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The Hound of the Baskervilles (1939) - First in the series of Arthur Conan Doyle adaptations, from 20th Century-Fox and director Sidney Lanfield. When the lord of Baskerville manor is slain, his property in Devonshire moors is inherited by Canadian Sir Henry Baskerville (Richard Greene). Local doctor James Mortimer (Lionel Atwill) approaches famed London detective Sherlock Holmes (Basil Rathbone) and his assistant Dr. Watson (Nigel Bruce) to look into the case, which is rumored to involve a ghostly, bloodthirsty hound. Also featuring Wendy Barrie, John Carradine, Barlowe Borland, Beryl Mercer, Morton Lowry, Ralph Forbes, Eily Malyon, and E.E. Clive.

This first outing for Rathbone and Bruce as Holmes and Watson is a handsomely mounted mystery with excellent production values. Richard Greene actually gets top billing, which is odd. It was fun seeing the future TV Robin Hood in scenes with the previous Sir Guy of Gisbourne. Despite this being the most famous film of this novel, I think it's the last one that I hadn't seen.   (7/10)

Source: MPI DVD.

Hound1.jpg

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18 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

The Silent Partner (1978) A bank teller Eliot Gould is held up at gun point by a Santa Claus (Christopher Plummer), during the holidays in Toronto. The robbery takes place after a large deposit is made.

The plot flaw is that the robbers only get Canadian currency.  :P

 

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The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1939) - Follow-up Holmes mystery, based loosely on a play, from 20th Century-Fox and director Alfred Werker. Holmes (Basil Rathbone) faces of with his nemesis Professor Moriarty (George Zucco), a criminal mastermind who continuously alludes prosecution. Moriarty decides to set an elaborate trap involving multiple mysteries to try and finally destroy the super sleuth. Also featuring Ida Lupino, Nigel Bruce, Arthur Hohl, Henry Stephenson, Alan Marshal, E.E. Clive, and Terry Kilburn.

I enjoyed seeing Zucco as the arch-fiend Moriarty, even if all of the mystery elements got occasionally muddled. Lupino is luminous as the damsel in distress, and this film was said to have revived her career. This was considered a disappointment by Fox, who declined to produce any more Holmes movies. Universal bought the rights from the Doyle estate and began producing more Rathbone/Bruce Holmes movies, although they made them contemporaneous rather than keeping the setting in the 1890's as the Fox movies had.   (7/10)

Source: MPI DVD.

Adventures+of+Sherlock+Holmes1.jpg 

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3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1939) - Follow-up Holmes mystery, based loosely on a play, from 20th Century-Fox and director Alfred Werker. Holmes (Basil Rathbone) faces of with his nemesis Professor Moriarty (George Zucco), a criminal mastermind who continuously alludes prosecution. Moriarty decides to set an elaborate trap involving multiple mysteries to try and finally destroy the super sleuth. Also featuring Ida Lupino, Nigel Bruce, Arthur Hohl, Henry Stephenson, Alan Marshal, E.E. Clive, and Terry Kilburn.

I enjoyed seeing Zucco as the arch-fiend Moriarty, even if all of the mystery elements got occasionally muddled. Lupino is luminous as the damsel in distress, and this film was said to have revived her career. This was considered a disappointment by Fox, who declined to produce any more Holmes movies. Universal bought the rights from the Doyle estate and began producing more Rathbone/Bruce Holmes movies, although they made them contemporaneous rather than keeping the setting in the 1890's as the Fox movies had.   (7/10)

Source: MPI DVD.

Adventures+of+Sherlock+Holmes1.jpg 

Adventures of Sherlock Holmes has always been my favourite of the Rathbone series. It's great to see Rathbone and Nigel Bruce in a Victorian England setting (as opposed to the updated Bs of the '40s), augmented by the handsome sets and costumes. George Zucco is my favourite of the three actors who would play Moriarty in the series, the actor bringing a smug sense of intellectual superiority to the role that matches that of Rathbone as Holmes. And the scene in which a club footed assassin pursues Ida Lupino in the dark is genuinely exciting and suspenseful.

Interestingly, I read that Rathbone ranked Hound of the Baskervilles as his favourite film of the series but, being the first, that was the one in which he had the excitement of creating the Holmes character. Every film in the series after that would just be a repeat of that same characterization, with the actor growing increasingly tired of its towards the end. He would leave the series in 1946, much to the chagrin of Bruce, who wanted to keep the series going, to return to the stage (with his role as the father in The Heiress the highlight of that stage return).

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20 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Every film in the series after that would just be a repeat of that same characterization, with the actor growing increasingly tired of its towards the end. 

I've seen 4 of the remaining Holmes films, and enjoyed them for what they were, to a degree. I have the remaining 8 on disc to watch when I get to the appropriate years. Much like the Charlie Chan films, the Mr. Moto movies, or the Falcon/Saint movies, I'm sure that I saw parts or all of many of them when I was a kid on Saturday TV, but it's been so long, and they tend to run together in one's memory.

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1 minute ago, LawrenceA said:

I've seen 4 of the remaining Holmes films, and enjoyed them for what they were, to a degree. I have the remaining 8 on disc to watch when I get to the appropriate years. Much like the Charlie Chan films, the Mr. Moto movies, or the Falcon/Saint movies, I'm sure that I saw parts or all of many of them when I was a kid on Saturday TV, but it's been so long, and they tend to run together in one's memory.

Lawrence, I don't know which of the four Universal Holmes that you saw but most fans rate The Scarlet Claw, an atmospheric thriller set in the marshes of Quebec, as the best of them. If you've yet to catch that one, it is well worth the effort. It's a good little film.

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33 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Adventures of Sherlock Holmes has always been my favourite of the Rathbone series.

It's a great film, and I love that it gave Rathbone the opportunity to do a music hall number. Much as I love the film, though, I think my favorite is The Scarlet Claw. But I love them all, even the one that quotes Winston Churchill. All of the films in the series have wonderful performances, even by the minor characters. Two of my favorites are Sally Shepherd as Mrs. Monteith in The House of Fear and Edmund Breon as Stinky in Dressed to Kill.

Sally_Shepherd_2.jpg

32497-5392.jpg

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2 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Lawrence, I don't know which of the four Universal Holmes that you saw but most fans rate The Scarlet Claw, an atmospheric thriller set in the marshes of Quebec, as the best of them. If you've yet to catch that one, it is well worth the effort. It's a good little film.

That's one I have yet to watch, so I'm happy to hear the good word. The ones that I have definitely already seen are Sherlock Holmes and the Secret WeaponThe Woman in GreenTerror By Night, and Dressed to Kill.

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2 minutes ago, Swithin said:

It's a great film, and I love that it gave Rathbone the opportunity to do a music hall number.

 

That moment in which Rathbone poses as a music hall entertainer is a marvel. Rathbone is so good that I'm not even certain that it's his voice, but, if it is, he's superb. As a matter of fact the actor rated this bit as his favourite of the entire series in which Holmes adopts a disguise.

adventures7.jpg

Yep, folks, that's Basil Rathbone.

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3 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

That's one I have yet to watch, so I'm happy to hear the good word. The ones that I have definitely already seen are Sherlock Holmes and the Secret WeaponThe Woman in GreenTerror By Night, and Dressed to Kill.

Terror By Night might be the worst film in the series.

But Secret Weapon and The Woman in Green are both very entertaining, though not in the league of The Scarlet Claw.

I love watching Hillary Brooke trying to hypnotize Holmes in Woman in Green. Her icy exterior and striking beauty were perfect for the role.

9WDOLbkhb7uCVDz1wVDDgNrptmj.jpg

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16 minutes ago, TomJH said:

That moment in which Rathbone poses as a music hall entertainer is a marvel. Rathbone is so good that I'm not even certain that it's his voice, but, if it is, he's superb.

Pretty sure it's his voice. It sounds like him, with a lower-class accent of course. And he did appear in a couple of musicals.

A double bill I would like to see: Sherlock Holmes and the Spider Woman; and The Spider Woman Strikes Back. The latter film has no relation to the former (Sherlock Holmes) film, apart from the presence of Gale Sondergaard and the use of spider venom.

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5 minutes ago, Swithin said:

Pretty sure it's his voice. It sounds like him, with a lower-class accent of course. And he did appear in a couple of musicals.

A double bill I would like to see: Sherlock Holmes and the Spider Woman; and The Spider Woman Strikes Back. The latter film has no relation to the former (Sherlock Holmes) film, apart from the presence of Gale Sondergaard and the use of spider venom.

I'm not certain that there is such a thing as a good looking print of The Spider Woman Strikes Back in existence, unfortunately. There's currently a print on You Tube, by the way, better than I've seen in the past (which isn't saying much).

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