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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

I'm not certain that there is such a thing as a good looking print of The Spider Woman Strikes Back in existence, unfortunately. There's currently a print on You Tube, by the way, better than I've seen in the past (which isn't saying much).

I've always enjoyed it. It was one of the original batch of Universal films shown on Shock Theater, hosted by Zacherley, when I was a kid.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_Theater

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Man of the World (1931)--So-so drama noteworthy as the first pairing of William Powell and Carole Lombard.  Powell plays a con-man in Paris, who preys on American tourists by printing their scandulous deeds in his make-shift tabloid...the paper is never really circulated, but used to blackmail the subjects.  Guy Kibbee, in his usual gullible personna, is an easy target for Powell, but things get complicated when Powell falls for his neice, Lombard.  Lombard is unofficially engaged to a nice fellow from 'back home', but when he's called away, she falls for Powell, and their relationship doesn't sit well with Powell's cohort in crime, and ex, Wynne Gibson.  The performances are okay..actually Gibson does the most with her small part, and Powell--all familiar charm in the first half--doesn't do 'mopey' that well for the second.  For some reason, Lombard looked different to me here..yes, she's young, but I think this was before she had her trademark high, thin, arched eyebrows ..changes her face.  The pace is a little slow, and the ending might not be what audiences were expected then..but I'm glad I watched.  Even in a rather mundane project, it's a treat to see Powell and Lombard.                                                      Related image

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Suburbicon (2017) - Darkly comic misfire thriller from Paramount Pictures, scripted by Joel & Ethan Coen and George Cloney & Grant Heslov, and director George Clooney. It's 1959, and the all-white planned community of Suburbicon is sent into turmoil when the first black family moves into the neighborhood. As tensions escalate, the home situation of young neighbor Nicky (Noah Jupe) gets even worse, as a home invasion leaves his mother dead. His father Gardner (Matt Damon) and concerned aunt Margaret (Julianne Moore) try to move on, but Nicky begins to suspect that something more sinister is afoot. Also featuring Oscar Isaac, Glenn Fleshler, Alex Hassell, and Karimah Westbrook.

It's not hard to tell which parts of the story are Coen brothers and which are Clooney and usual creative partner Heslov. The off-kilter family drama that turns more and more menacing, and the characters who aren't half as clever as they think they are, are Coen hallmarks, while the white vs black racial animosity simmering in the "idyllic" 50's America rings of Clooney and Heslov social awareness. The two parts don't make a cohesive whole, and it's easy to see why the Coens didn't make this one themselves, as even the better parts involving the family mystery aren't terribly original. Clooney is an actor that I've liked in several things, but his directing career is certainly hit-or-miss, and I'd have to say more miss at this point. Classic film lovers may enjoy some of the period trappings, as well as the faux-Bernard Herrmann score by Alexandre Desplat.  (6/10)

Source: Paramount Blu-ray.

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CASPER (1995): Bill Pullman, Christina Ricci 

I don't recall ever watching this when I was younger, but I'm glad I didn't. I really only watched it now because it was on my list, and I'm not a quitter (only in the case of The Last Unicorn did I quit watching). Granted, it's a kid's movie from the 90s, it's fairly inevitable that it's going to be predictable and annoying. I give it 1/5. 

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SewWhite- for what it's worth, it took a complete second viewing for me to completely "get" the brilliance of BLACK NARCISSUS. The first viewing was enjoyable, although it seemed like I missed a lot of the nuances. Second viewing, the intentions of the director became much clearer-I remember being moved to tears over the footage of the jeweled necklace. BN is now one of my favorites because so much of the story is told with pictures.

And yes, often horses born wild in tough climates are stunted. Tall horses are bred for height, like racing Thoroughbreds or show jumpers.

And David Farrar as "hot"? Ew. He's about as "hot" as Richard Simmons.
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Big Thanks to the programmers,  because this year I think they’ve really put some thought into the whole 31 DAYS Programming and Tried as hard as they can to reach outside of the box.

im rewatching BLITHE SPIRIT (1945) right now and it’s a delight. 

Last night I watched a goodly chunk of AIR FORCE (1943)...it was well shot and the cinematography was grand, and most of the actors were compelling in some form or another (It was interesting to see “Eddie Mars” from THE BIG SLEEP in the lead role, he was actually quite sexy with the stubble, ditto GIG YOUNG, Who pretty much just had to sit in the cockpit with a cigarette to steal most of his scenes. Harry Carey was also pretty good and John Garfield did the most he could with the pretty one note role that seemed to be filmed in between his other projects because he came and went from the movie to a degree that his character felt like a “Special Guest Star” )

the Male camaraderie that features in a lot of Howard hawks movies was there, but it ended up being something of a fault to the movie- About an hour and a half in, there is an interminably long scene in the cockpit where a pursuit pilot who is tagging along with the guys on the way to a mission has THE LONGEST DULLEST SPEECH ABOUT AIR FORCE TECHNICAL JARGON. It GRINDS THE FILM TO A SCREECHING HALT, Not just because the actor delivering the lines is really boring and mumbles, but also because the scene just does not need to be there. It is dreadful. Combine that with the fact that I went to the IMDB section for the movie and search the gooFS, of which there are about 23 mostly related to the fact they got all kinds of things wrong in relation to the salutes, uniforms, military jargon, and various other details and I just couldn’t go on

Seriously, if they had just cut that scene and maybe substituted a Johnson measuring contest – which is basically what the whole thing was anyhow – the film whold be helped immeasurably.

It was also very irresponsible that the filmmakers claimed Japanese private civilians on Hawaii participated in sabotage on Pearl Harbor, when apparently they absolutely did not in real life.

Maybe if this comes on again sometime and I catch it around the time where I walked out, I’ll take it up again. But seriously, it was a prime case of how just one BADLY WRITTEN AND ACTED scene can just run everything straight into the ground

 

(Note I am posting this using the voice transcription on my phone, so I apologize for all the punctuation errors any words it did not hear right.)

 

EDITED TO ADD: I imdb'd the actor who has the awful monologue in the bad, bad scene. his name was JAMES BROWN (no, not that one) He was also in WAKE ISLAND, OBJECTIVE BURMA!, CORVETTE K-225, and GOING MY WAY...I don't recall him in them. all i can stress is that he MUST have been the on-set hook-up for broads or Bennies or something because I cannot FATHOM why Hawks would allow such a bad actor and scene to just KILL THE MOVIE at the halfway point.

 

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On 2/5/2018 at 10:06 PM, cigarjoe said:

The Silent Partner (1978) A bank teller Eliot Gould is held up at gun point by a Santa Claus (Christopher Plummer), during the holidays in Toronto. The robbery takes place after a large deposit is made. But he's anticipating the heist because of two things, a discarded withdrawal slip he found earlier with identical capitol "G's" that match a hand drawn sign he spots held by the same Santa Claus, and the fact that the Santa was going to rob the bank right after a large deposit was made by a local business man, but he was foiled in the earlier attempt by a small boy who attracted a lot of attention because wanted to tell Santa his Christmas list. 

Because the observant teller knows whats coming he devises a way to steal most of the money for himself while letting Santa get away with a portion.

Its a nice little cat and mouse game once the real thief figures out what happened and wants a cut of the loot. Susannah York, Céline Lomez and John Candy round out the rest of the cast  . 8/10

This one has been one of my favorites for a long time.  It was based on a novel by Danish writer ANDERS BODELSEN titled "Think Of A Number" (cleverly said by Plummer in the first of his threatening phone calls).  Took me YEARS to finally hunt down a copy of that book, and must say the film tops my short list of  "Movies that were better than the book". ;)   I thought all in the cast did their roles superbly and the score by fellow Canadian OSCAR PETERSON was equally superb.

Sepiatone

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17 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1939) -

[Ida] Lupino is luminous as the damsel in distress, and this film was said to have revived her career.

Really?

I thought THE LIGHT THAT FAILED (also 1939) was the one that revived her career...

I posted an episode of BIOGRAPHY about Ida on her Birthday (February 4th) and it included her LAUGH UNTIL YOU GO MAD scene, impressive work.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Really?

I thought THE LIGHT THAT FAILED (also 1939) was the one that revived her career...

I posted an episode of BIOGRAPHY about Ida on her Birthday (February 4th) and it included her LAUGH UNTIL YOU GO MAD scene, impressive work.

I was going by this, from IMDb:

"The film revived the faltered career of Ida Lupino, whose Hollywood roles were dwindling. It was in fact a radio performance on Orson Welles' "Mercury Theatre of the Air" that brought her to the attention of a Fox casting agent, who was impressed with her clear voice and mid-Atlantic delivery."

Plus, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes came out a few months earlier than The Light That Failed.

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Buck Rogers (1939) - 12-chapter science fiction adventure serial based on the popular comic strip of the day, from Universal Pictures and directors Ford Beebe and Saul Goodkind. 20th-century pilot Buck Rogers (Larry "Buster" Crabbe) and his young pal Buddy Wade (Jackie Moran) are put into a state of suspended animation by an experimental gas after their dirigible crashes in the mountains. They remain alive, asleep, and unchanged until they are discovered by chance in the year 2440 A.D. They quickly become involved in a war between the good people of the Hidden City against Earth's tyrannical ruler, the gangster known as Killer Kane (Anthony Warde). Buck, Buddy, and new compatriot Wilma Deering (Constance Moore) try to secure a treaty with the people of Saturn in order to finish Killer Kane and his armies once and for all. Also featuring Jack Mulhall, Philson Ahn, C. Montague Shaw, Guy Usher, William Gould, Henry Brandon, Wheeler Oakman, and Wade Boteler.

Although Buck Rogers was older, having first been published in 1928. he was beaten to the screen by Flash Gordon, who had been created to compete with Buck Rogers in the comic strip market. Crabbe had already played Gordon twice, in serials in 1936 and 1938, to great success. The end result is that this expensive (for a serial) effort seems like an also-ran, more than a little repetitive, and failing to measure up to the Gordon serials in a few departments. Those include Moore as female lead Wilma Deering, who here makes little to no impression at all, unlike Jean Rogers in the Gordon films, and the main villain, Killer Kane, who doesn't hold a candle to Ming the Merciless. The addition of a young kid sidekick is also unnecessary, although it became a regular feature in kid-targeted programming of the time.

As I mentioned, this was an expensive serial, with large, impressive sets, and lots of "special" effects shots of flying airships. The costumes aren't very impressive, though, with many of the characters wearing shiny shower caps, which I guess is the fashion in 2440. Kane's men use a mind control device to make their victims into brainless slaves, and the devices look like water buckets sitting on top of their heads. I also enjoyed the Saturnians, who employ a slave race of ugly subhumans known as Zuggs. The plot relied heavily on both Rogers and Kane trying to secure an alliance with the Saturnians, but I never really understood why, since they never do much of anything. Fans of vintage sci-fi kitsch will like this, but find a comfy chair, since it's 4 hours long.  (7/10)

Source: VCI DVD, with a picture that's barely passable.

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Our heroes

BuckRogers1939_fromPhotofest_lowres-deta

Bucket-head

8469130791_31ebf56259.jpg

The Zuggs

5cc5f112eacedb25f18c7da8fcca96d6--flash-

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Do Not Fold, Spindle or Mutilate--a 1971 ABC movie of the week.  You can't beat this casting..Helen Hayes, Myrna Loy, Mildred Natwick and Sylvia Sidney star as a group of elderly 'ladies who lunch' who decide to shake up their routine and invent a young woman to enroll in that new-fangled computer dating scene.  Since they don't give their imaginary single lady a phone, they get a few letters, and it's all just fun..until a psychopath enters the scene as one of the suitors, and the 4some get mixed up in a murder investigation.  It should be pointed out that these aren't sweet little old grandmas who knit..they imbibe regularly, and are more likely to be sipping cocktails than tea during their card games. Helen Hayes steals the show as the 'with it' one who comes up with the schemes, and fails to be grounded by her practical sister, Loy.  Natwick gets some great lines, and is prone to fainting at opportune times, while Sidney is a cynic, but will joint in for a good time.  It's like a time capsule, with the ladies eating in a cafe dripping with ferns and wondering how they would look in hot pants. Vince Edwards is okay as the menacing man who spoils their fun but hearing his thoughts constantly gets a little old.  The ladies are one step ahead of the police at every stage, which all leads to an amusing finish.  The print of this was quite washed out in places (I guess someone uploaded an old recording..even the ABC intro was included) but it was terrific to see these four-- perhaps past their big screen days, but so very entertaining.  A great find.  source: terrarium                      Related image

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For the third or fourth time I tried watching Dinner at Eight, but turned it off before the ending.  I know it's been mentioned quite a bit on the board over time, and I like all the players in the movie (in other roles), but I find it's just so talky, with nothing about the characters themselves to draw me in.  What am I missing here?

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I Just Watched 31 Days of Oscar Edition Post #4 2/6

I'm gonna skip documentary day, because I'd have to talk about An Inconvenient Truth, which will just draw snark and hate and would probably get moved to OffTopic. But yeah, I did watch that for the first time. Anyway, here's what I saw on a very long night of movie watching:

Air Force (Warner Bros., 1943) - Every time this movie plays on TCM, the host mentions that the film was intentionally stocked with unknowns in the cast except for John Garfield, although I would hardly call Gig Young, Arthur Kennedy and Harry Carey "unknowns", and you might not know George Tobias by name, but his face is very recognizable. I did like how Garfield was just one of the guys in this ensemble piece. He's the resident hothead of the plane, but his story arc gets equal balance with the others. It may have been pretty early in the careers of the first two. There are some good special effects in this film of planes going down and so forth. Apparently there was a real Mary-Ann that made a grueling journey from San Francisco to the Philippines in very short order with brief stops at Hawaii and Wake Island (and then is getting ready to depart for Tokyo at the end of the film. It was part of the Dolittle raid, too?), but I feel like very little of the film probably corresponds to reality. It was a morale booster, pure and simple, and given its box office success, it clearly did its job well, while not shying away completely from the realities of war, as not all the crew members make it to the end of the movie. A little too much of it feels movie phony to me. Tobias keeps sticking his face in front of a window where sniper bullets are coming through, and somehow he never gets hit. There's a cute dog trained to bark whenever someone says "Moto", which leads to the surreal utterance of the expression "Hello, Moto" 60 years before the phone commercials. I just read on imdb scene that the (Spoiler Alert!) deathbed scene of Quincannon was written by William Faulkner to makes thing extra poignant, which to my mind, doesn't say much for Faulkner, because the captain hallucinating the plane is taking off and all the crew members playing their parts in the imaginary flight I find pretty hokey, but maybe I'm just not much of a sentimentalist. Carey's pride in his son and his his reaction to the news of his death ("He didn't even get in the air!") are pretty powerful.

The Adventures of Robin Hood (Warner Bros., 1938) - Well, what can I say about this one that hasn't been said already? Errol Flynn's best movie? The best action movie of its era? Claude Rains and Basil Rathbone masterfully villain-y, and Olivia De Havilland certainly beautiful, although her substantial roles would have to wait until her departure from WB. Does anyone know the story behind the two credited directors? Certainly odd for the studio era. Even when one director filled in for another for whatever reason, usually only one director got credit. See Gone With the Wind.

How the West Was Won (MGM, 1962) - My first time to make it all the way through this thing. There is a certain sameness to the vignettes, so much so, that I can't make out who directed which piece (it's in the credits, I think, but I didn't pay attention). I thought at least I'd be able to tell which were the John Ford segments. I actually sort of avoided looking at the screen during the opening credits. I wanted to see how many actors I could identify without knowing in advance who was in the movie. Though I recognized the faces of George Peppard, Russ Tamblyn and Agnes Moorehead, I couldn't think of their names until I looked them up on imdb after the movie was over. Also I didn't notice it was Raymond Massey making a cameo as Lincoln, although that was certainly appropriate. I was disappointed that (Spoiler alert!) Jimmy Stewart's character died off camera (and Karl Malden and Moorehead pretty much do, too. It was if the filmmakers didn't want any of the good guys to die on camera). It almost felt like he'd shot his scenes in the earlier segment and was already off making another movie at another studio by the time they got around to his character's death. I knew he was going to die because someone listed all the movies in which he plays characters who die (without posting any spoiler alerts, thank you very much) in another thread a couple of weeks ago. I don't know what to say. Probably worth seeing in Cinerama, but on my little TV, it wasn't that spectacular. For all the star power, none of the acting really stands out. The final vignette with the action-packed train robbery was the most classically Western of the scenes.

Grand Prix (MGM, 1966) - Oh, my God, I believe this movie is actually about 10 minutes LONGER than How the West Was Won. This is a John Frankenheimer film in which I feel Frankenheimer's identity as a filmmaker is almost completely subsumed in service of the project. All those split screens and the quick cuts in the uptempo dance numbers seemed like they could have been shot by any director in any 60s movie. I wouldn't have recognized Jessica Walter from Arrested Development and Archer in a million years. Wow, she was a looker! As was Francoise Hardy, who had a big multinational hit as a singer around the same time she was in this movie. I like all the actors in this international cast, but the movie just didn't wow me in any particular way.

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52 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

The Adventures of Robin Hood (Warner Bros., 1938) - Well, what can I say about this one that hasn't been said already? Errol Flynn's best movie? The best action movie of its era? Claude Rains and Basil Rathbone masterfully villain-y, and Olivia De Havilland certainly beautiful, although her substantial roles would have to wait until her departure from WB. Does anyone know the story behind the two credited directors? Certainly odd for the studio era. Even when one director filled in for another for whatever reason, usually only one director got credit. See Gone With the Wind.

William Keighley directed the Sherwood Forest scenes early in the production, but Jack Warner replaced him with Michael Curtiz because he didn't think the film had enough of a visual punch. Curtiz would direct the Nottingham Castle scenes, including the duel, and re-do some of the archery tournament, which Keighley had done. Curtiz also re-directed the balcony love scene.

Olivia de Havilland had an anecdote about teasing Flynn in this scene. She kept "flubbing" her lines so they had to re-do their kissing time and again, causing an excited Errol to have a reaction within his pants. This was vengeance on her part towards him. He had been talking about getting a divorce to marry her but during the making of Robin Hood Lili Damita, his wife, had shown up during the Sherwood Forest scenes, and it became apparent to Olivia that their marriage was still working - at least, to a degree.

The point of relating this anecdote is that it was during the Keighley shooting of the balcony scene that this all took place. That version has now disappeared, unfortunately. What we have in the final film is the Curtiz-directed version of that same scene, in which none of this teasing took place. Curtiz would have been screaming at Olivia if she had tried those same kind of games on his set.

In his autobiography Flynn wrote that one leading lady completely surprised him by giving him a French kiss during one of his love scenes. He didn't name the actress but I have to wonder if it was Olivia on the Robin Hood set.

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Thanks for the extra info on AIR FORCE, I also saw it and posted a review pretty simpatico with yours, curious if you noticed some of the things I did as well. I think Wikipedia and the goofs section on IMDb Did a pretty good job in delineating the movie’s fact from fiction.

Ps- I HATE GRAND PRIX. Dear GOD, that MOVIE AIRS LIKE EVERY OTHER WEEKEND I SWEAR!

pss- don’t ever be afraid to talk about any movie you see for any reason here. This is a pretty Proletariat thread, and I’d like to think nothing (Outside of outright por n or a snuff movie) is off limits for discussion 

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Lorna, I just scrolled back and read your review. Your revelation that the captain was Eddie Mars hit me like a thunderbolt. I felt like I'd seen him somewhere before, but I couldn't place him. I also finished the movie feeling uncertain of all this saboteur business, which I certainly couldn't remember reading about anywhere before. Appreciate your clarification there as well.

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28 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

Lorna, I just scrolled back and read your review. Your revelation that the captain was Eddie Mars hit me like a thunderbolt. I felt like I'd seen him somewhere before, but I couldn't place him. I also finished the movie feeling uncertain of all this saboteur business, which I certainly couldn't remember reading about anywhere before. Appreciate your clarification there as well.

Isn't Air Force the film in which George Tobias (or someone else)proclaimed after shooting down a plane, "One fried J a p going down!"?

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The Cat and the Canary (1939) - Entertaining comic mystery thriller from Paramount Pictures and director Elliott Nugent. There's a reading of a will at an isolated mansion deep in the Louisiana bayou. When Joyce Norman (Paulette Goddard) is named the sole heir, it makes her a target. The only one she seems to be able count on is cowardly actor Wally Campbell (Bob Hope). As if the situation isn't bad enough, there's also reports that a homicidal lunatic has escaped from a nearby asylum and may be on the premises. Also featuring Gale Sondergaard, John Beal, Elizabeth Patterson, Douglass Montgomery, Nydia Westman, John Wray, George Regas, Charles Lane, and George Zucco.

Here's another one that I may have seen when I was very young, as parts were familiar, and not just because I've seen the 1927 version more than once. I enjoyed this one as well, especially the last several minutes that actually rival any of the straight horror films being made at the time. Goddard is beautiful and fun, and Hope is really starting to solidify his comedic screen persona. I also always enjoy Gal Sondergaard, and she doesn't disappoint here, either.  (7/10)

Source: Universal DVD, part of Bob Hope: Classic Comedy Collection.

Cat+and+the+Canary,+Hope,+Goddard,+and+c

 

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17 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

I've already forgotten if that line is in there (I was zoning out a bit the longer it went), but there are several derogatory references to the Japanese during the movie, including an unfortunate simian reference made by Carey.

Yeh, the Japanese really got the racist comments flying during the war in a lot of the Hollywood product. Objective Burma did the same thing in one absurd rant by newsman Henry Hull. Ironically the screenwriter (actually there were a few of them on this film) wanted his racist speech cut out but he was overruled (by producer Jerry Wald, I believe).

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8 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The Cat and the Canary (1939) - Entertaining comic mystery thriller from Paramount Pictures and director Elliott Nugent. There's a reading of a will at an isolated mansion deep in the Louisiana bayou. When Joyce Norman (Paulette Goddard) is named the sole heir, it makes her a target. The only one she seems to be able count on is cowardly actor Wally Campbell (Bob Hope). As if the situation isn't bad enough, there's also reports that a homicidal lunatic has escaped from a nearby asylum and may be on the premises. Also featuring Gale Sondergaard, John Beal, Elizabeth Patterson, Douglass Montgomery, Nydia Westman, John Wray, George Regas, Charles Lane, and George Zucco.

Here's another one that I may have seen when I was very young, as parts were familiar, and not just because I've seen the 1927 version more than once. I enjoyed this one as well, especially the last several minutes that actually rival any of the straight horror films being made at the time. Goddard is beautiful and fun, and Hope is really starting to solidify his comedic screen persona. I also always enjoy Gal Sondergaard, and she doesn't disappoint here, either.  (7/10)

Source: Universal DVD, part of Bob Hope: Classic Comedy Collection.

Cat+and+the+Canary,+Hope,+Goddard,+and+c

 

This movie has aired on TCM a handful of times, including just this past October. Bob Hope is not everyone's cup of tea, but I find especially early career Hope very funny. And I have a big crush on Paulette Goddard. I believe I've read an anecdote where Charlie Chaplin spent part of a day on the set (because of Goddard, natch) and praised Hope for his mastery of comic timing.

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1 minute ago, LawrenceA said:

The Cat and the Canary (1939) - Entertaining comic mystery thriller from Paramount Pictures and director Elliott Nugent. There's a reading of a will at an isolated mansion deep in the Louisiana bayou. When Joyce Norman (Paulette Goddard) is named the sole heir, it makes her a target. The only one she seems to be able count on is cowardly actor Wally Campbell (Bob Hope). As if the situation isn't bad enough, there's also reports that a homicidal lunatic has escaped from a nearby asylum and may be on the premises. Also featuring Gale Sondergaard, John Beal, Elizabeth Patterson, Douglass Montgomery, Nydia Westman, John Wray, George Regas, Charles Lane, and George Zucco.

Here's another one that I may have seen when I was very young, as parts were familiar, and not just because I've seen the 1927 version more than once. I enjoyed this one as well, especially the last several minutes that actually rival any of the straight horror films being made at the time. Goddard is beautiful and fun, and Hope is really starting to solidify his comedic screen persona. I also always enjoy Gal Sondergaard, and she doesn't disappoint here, either.  (7/10)

Source: Universal DVD, part of Bob Hope: Classic Comedy Collection.

Cat+and+the+Canary,+Hope,+Goddard,+and+c

 

But one of the interesting things about The Cat and the Canary (as well as the followup Ghost Breakers) is that Hope is able to convincingly perform the impressive transformation from nervous coward with the wise cracks to leading man putting his life on the line to try to rescue the leading lady from a fiend.

This was the production which solidified Hope's star status in his first really good film. This would lead to the previously mentioned Ghost Breakers (another beautifully photographed comedy thriller with genuine scare moments, assisted to no little degree by an eerie musical score by Ernst Toch) and the first of the "Road" films with Crosby the following year.

One of my favourite lines in Cat and the Canary occurs when Nydia Westman says, "Don't big empty houses scare you?" to which Hope replies, "Not me. I used to work in vaudeville."

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3 hours ago, shutoo said:

Do Not Fold, Spindle or Mutilate--a 1971 ABC movie of the week.  You can't beat this casting..Helen Hayes, Myrna Loy, Mildred Natwick and Sylvia Sidney star as a group of elderly 'ladies who lunch' who decide to shake up their routine and invent a young woman to enroll in that new-fangled computer dating scene.  Since they don't give their imaginary single lady a phone, they get a few letters, and it's all just fun..until a psychopath enters the scene as one of the suitors, and the 4some get mixed up in a murder investigation.  It should be pointed out that these aren't sweet little old grandmas who knit..they imbibe regularly, and are more likely to be sipping cocktails than tea during their card games. Helen Hayes steals the show as the 'with it' one who comes up with the schemes, and fails to be grounded by her practical sister, Loy.  Natwick gets some great lines, and is prone to fainting at opportune times, while Sidney is a cynic, but will joint in for a good time.  It's like a time capsule, with the ladies eating in a cafe dripping with ferns and wondering how they would look in hot pants. Vince Edwards is okay as the menacing man who spoils their fun but hearing his thoughts constantly gets a little old.  The ladies are one step ahead of the police at every stage, which all leads to an amusing finish.  The print of this was quite washed out in places (I guess someone uploaded an old recording..even the ABC intro was included) but it was terrific to see these four-- perhaps past their big screen days, but so very entertaining.  A great find.  source: terrarium                      Related image

Looks like an interesting film. All of these ladies were great actresses in their heyday....maybe one day a better print of this movie will come out (maybe wishful thinking on my part, but I can hope, can't I?).

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41 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

maybe one day a better print of this movie will come out (maybe wishful thinking on my part, but I can hope, can't I?).

Unfortunately, the majority of these made-for-tv movies are gone for good..no one seems interesting in restoring them (no profit in it, I suppose)..there must have been hundreds of them.  I've found a few using apps that scrape servers.  It's too bad the networks won't start individual streaming services with their older content--they have it, own it, and aren't making any $ from it now, so for a low fee, I bet they'd get quite a few subscribers for no effort.

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