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That always tickled me too.  But with Bergen's skills, radio was the only medium which worked for him as a ventriloquist.  But he knew it too, and it was the sharp witted repartee between him and his puppet CHARLIE McCARTHY that was the main focus.

Still during his lifetime, Bergen had no qualms about poking fun at himself and his ventriloquism "skill", I remember on PARKAY margarine commercial which had Charlie sitting with Edgar, and Bergen saying something about how much he liked Parkay margarine, and of course, just then, the container would open it's lid a bit and say "butter".  Bergen then turned to Charlie and asked, "What was that, Charlie?"  and McCarthy answered, "I didn't say anything.  Your LIPS didn't move!" :D

Sepiatone

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11 hours ago, EricJ said:

Even for a black-and-white movie, when Takashi Shimura goes into the hut disguised as the monk, all we hear is a tense pause, a "whsshht!" of a sword, and a dead outlaw collapses out, that's one of the most "...WHOA.  :blink: " moments in classic action films, considering it isn't even onscreen.

that is the moment the film hooked me. it was incredible, especially when contrasted with how the scene begins (who the hell is this old homeless dude and why in the hell is he shaving his head by a river during a hostage crisis?)

I also have to say- in a genuine, real and unpretentious way- that I just friggin love black and white, really to the point where i genuinely prefer it to color.

seriously. I'm old. I'm weird. Sue me.

and thank Heavens SEVEN SAMURAI was in BLACK AND WHITE (and GLORIOUS BLACK AND WHITE at that)...in color it would not have been the same.

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

That always tickled me too.  But with Bergen's skills, radio was the only medium which worked for him as a ventriloquist.  But he knew it too, and it was the sharp witted repartee between him and his puppet CHARLIE McCARTHY that was the main focus.

Still during his lifetime, Bergen had no qualms about poking fun at himself and his ventriloquism "skill", I remember on PARKAY margarine commercial which had Charlie sitting with Edgar, and Bergen saying something about how much he liked Parkay margarine, and of course, just then, the container would open it's lid a bit and say "butter".  Bergen then turned to Charlie and asked, "What was that, Charlie?"  and McCarthy answered, "I didn't say anything.  Your LIPS didn't move!" :D

Sepiatone

I'm still amazed that Edgar Bergen was the father of this beautiful lady. Such an ordinary looking man with such a stunner for a daughter.

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She talked about growing up with Charlie McCarthy as her brother.

Back in the early '80s I met a stunningly beautiful woman during a trip. Afterward, though, when I tried to recall her face the only image that came to mind was that of Candice Bergen. When I then met the same lady again I was struck by how, except for her nose which was a bit shorter (making her, perhaps, even lovelier) she had a striking resemblance to Bergen. This was about six or seven years before Murphy Brown was a hit for the actress on TV.

In any event I said to the lady, "Did you know that you look remarkably like Candice Bergen?"

Incredibly, she did not feel complimented by the observation, saying, "Everybody tells me that all the time. You know, I'm much younger than her."

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Indiscreet (1958)

This came from Netflix, somewhat serendipitously it seems, given a recent discussion of the comedy of Cary Grant on I believe this very thread. How apropo.

 

If it weren't for the spectacular presence of Ingrid Bergman I might have gotten a little restive with this one. I can't remember last when so arrestingly smitten by whatever magic that emanates from this woman. Never mind the details as you can probably see them for yourself, the overall amply reveals the considerableness of the parts, suffice to to say she is a complete picture of a complete woman.  Only a Cary Grant looking the way he does deserves her. The necessary conflicts in any story were slow in coming, however, and it was getting dull. Cary Grant was rather boring at first but it wasn't his fault. Until she is on to him he is content to be his staid, rather dull, charming self and even the eye candy elements might be starting to wear thin (though I wouldn't be the one to ask). When things start to finally happen things liven up, including Grant. In fact they both do and it's a relief to finally see them loosen up with each other and get real. That final little set up, the ruse that promised perhaps a screwball element in the otherwise conventional teleplay, is a little anticlimactic but no matter, it serves the purpose. From there a short way to a totally satisfying ending. It's certainly had it's desired effect on me. Had I been called upon not to betray an occasional proclivity for sappiness, I would have failed. And happily so. And an added bonus ; the extraordinary allure of Ingrid Bergman that will remain with me for a long time.

 

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38 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I'm still amazed that Edgar Bergen was the father of this beautiful lady. Such an ordinary looking man with such a stunner for a daughter.

murphy-brown-cbs-revival1.jpg

She talked about growing up with Charlie McCarthy as her brother.

Back in the early '80s I met a stunningly beautiful woman during a trip. Afterward, though, when I tried to recall her face the only image that came to mind was that of Candice Bergen. When I then met the same lady again I was struck by how, except for her nose which was a bit shorter (making her, perhaps, even lovelier) she had a striking resemblance to Bergen. This was about six or seven years before Murphy Brown was a hit for the actress on TV.

In any event I said to the lady, "Did you know that you look remarkably like Candice Bergen?"

Incredibly, she did not feel complimented by the observation, saying, "Everybody tells me that all the time. You know, I'm much younger than her."

There's nothing extraordinary at all about Edgar Bergen having such a beautiful daughter. Edgar married Frances Westerman an actress -model who was more than 20 years his junior and who was an exceedingly beautiful woman. Frances was a movie actress who appeared in the Yancy Derringer TV series with Jock Mahoney.

Also Frances gave Candice a real life brother named Kris.

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3 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

There's nothing extraordinary at all about Edgar Bergen having such a beautiful daughter. Edgar married Frances Westerman an actress -model who was more than 20 years his junior and who was an exceedingly beautiful woman. Frances was a movie actress who appeared in the Yancy Derringer TV series with Jock Mahoney.

Also Frances gave Candice a real life brother named Kris.

She must have been reeeeeeeally beautiful!

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

She must have been reeeeeeeally beautiful!

 You can check her out; she was in some movies. But I saw her when she was, I guess, close to middle-aged on The Jack Benny Show and, yes,  she was exquisite. You might say rather the Dina Merrill or Alexis Smith type.

 Unfortunately what little I've heard about Edgar Bergen is that he was somewhat of a tyrant.

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Just finished watching BEDLAM on DVD (after two previous attempts, finally got a DVD that works!). Boris Karloff stars as a sinister administrator of an asylum in the 18th century, who manages to manipulate a socially conscience young, and sane woman (Anna Lee) to be placed under his care.

Don't know how I feel about this movie. Certainly Karloff is reliable as always, Lee's character, while she can be somewhat ignorant of the mentally ill, she does eventually realize that even the mentally ill are human beings and should be treated as such. 

The movie doesn't seem to me so much a horror film, as much as a commentary on how insane asylums were ran and the inmates treated in those days. But I think the movie falls a bit short on that. I realize that, because of the times and the Code, they couldn't show all the true horrors that went on in the mental wards in those days, but the inmates in here aren't actually shown to be mistreated all that much, save for being locked in a cage or chained to a wall.

Still the film is watchable, and Karloff makes it so.

 

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5 hours ago, TomJH said:

I'm still amazed that Edgar Bergen was the father of this beautiful lady. Such an ordinary looking man with such a stunner for a daughter.

She talked about growing up with Charlie McCarthy as her brother.

"Charlie had a bigger room than I did!"

When Edgar came back to do his later radio show in the 50's, lil' 6-yo. Candy was often brought on as Cute-Relief, such as showing off her trying to learn her dad's ventriloquism.

6 hours ago, TomJH said:

Anybody else as amused/amazed by the popularity of a ventriloquist on the radio?

No--Considering I've got a good number of them on old-radio MP3.  :lol:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byuVh147ALI

Bergen actually worked better on the radio, since his physical "skill" wasn't that great, but his comic timing was.  With the visual distraction removed, and Charlie's own talent for making Edgar the foolish straight-foil, it was that harder to believe that Edgar, Charlie and Mortimer were not being done by three different radio comics.

6 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Still during his lifetime, Bergen had no qualms about poking fun at himself and his ventriloquism "skill", I remember on PARKAY margarine commercial which had Charlie sitting with Edgar, and Bergen saying something about how much he liked Parkay margarine, and of course, just then, the container would open it's lid a bit and say "butter".  Bergen then turned to Charlie and asked, "What was that, Charlie?"  and McCarthy answered, "I didn't say anything.  Your LIPS didn't move!" :D

That was a favorite running joke:  If Edgar was surprised and said "Why, do you realize what you're saying, Charlie?", the response was, "I should, I read your lips."  

Also, in one radio show, Edgar had a slight real-life cold, and Charlie was starting to develop a slight cough in his lines.  "Sorry, folks," Charlie explained, "when Bergen has a cold, everyone suffers."

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4 hours ago, laffite said:

Indiscreet (1958)

That final little set up, the ruse that promised perhaps a screwball element in the otherwise conventional teleplay, is a little anticlimactic but no matter, it serves the purpose. From there a short way to a totally satisfying ending. ... And an added bonus ; the extraordinary allure of Ingrid Bergman that will remain with me for a long time.

Now I have to go watch this again. It has been too long. Both actors are magnificent, and like Ingrid's character, I, too, am crazy about hard currency. 

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Personal Shopper (2017)

 

I don't know much about ghost stories but I have been gravitating to them of late. This one is the most realistic one I have run into so far. A woman's twin-brother has passed away and she is preoccupied with an oath they had made, whoever dies first will try to pierce the divide and leave a sign for the other. There is a rather sadistic soundtrack consisting of a free-floating sonar-like program but instead of underwater, we get a generalized array of ambient tracks from whatever locale our POV character happens to be at the time and at an extremely high decibel level. If the idea is to keep the viewer a little on edge, it succeeds. There is an extraordinarily realistic visitation scene which frightens. There is a sequence where an unknown texter is harassing the survivor, which under the circumstances, is more than a little eerie. The denouement is predictably unclear except perhaps for especially perceptive viewers of which I do not belong. But an explanation is there that seems quite convincing (I had to read it from a review) which I give the movie credit for. It's not just a scary story that leads nowhere.
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Zorro's Fighting Legion (1939) - 12-chapter western action serial from Republic Pictures and directors John English and William Witney. In 1824 Mexico, the fragile Republic is vulnerable to overthrow. A mysterious figure known as Don Del Oro has organized the Yaqui Indians into a guerrilla army against the government headed by Benito Juarez (Carleton Young), with Don Del Oro intent on becoming a new emperor of all Mexico. Juarez instructs Don Diego Vega (Reed Hadley) to form a secret fighting legion to fight the Yaqui and learn the identity of their leader. Don Diego does so under his masked guise as...Zorro! Also featuring Sheila Darcy, William Corson, Leander De Cordova, Edmund Cobb, John Merton, C. Montague Shaw, and Budd Buster.

This was the second of five Zorro serials at Republic, made between 1937 and 1949. In serial fan circles this one is considered one of the best. It has a lot of positives but I don't know that I'd rank it that high in my meager list of serials seen. The western-movie-style stuntwork is exceptional, with a lot of trick riding and outdoor action, some done by Yakima Canutt. Hadley is very good as Zorro, although his mask is different than in other Zorro films/shows. His Don Diego is especially amusing. There's a recurring bit with people getting killed by a golden arrow whenever they are about to reveal the identity of Don Del Oro that becomes unintentionally funny. Speaking of which, Don Del Oro himself is the most memorable visual, looking like a cross between an Aztec god and one of those clunky 1930's robots.  (7/10)

Source: Alpha Video DVD. A really terrible print, made from a VHS tape with occasional tracking lines, and all 3 and half hours compressed on one DVD.

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The Alphabet Murders (1965)..Based on Agatha Christie's "The A.B.C. Murders", with Tony Randall as an unlikely choice for Hercule Poirot.  If you take your Christie seriously, this probably isn't for you, but it is a fun light mystery.  Poirot is in London when a string of murders peaks his interest--the only motive seems to be the initials of the victims..A.A., B.B., etc. I enjoyed the pairing of Robert Morley and Randall.  Morley, as the official assigned to escort Poirot about town, spends most of his time playing catch-up with calm exasperation..very British.  Although some Poirot portrayals feature a humorous side, this one includes more physical comedy..perhaps an inspiration of director Frank Tashlin, who directed numerous Jerry Lewis films.  For all Miss Marple fans, there is even a humorous cameo by Margaret Rutherford and Stringer Davis, bemoaning the ineptitude of the police in solving the murders.  Evidently, Ms Christie didn't like this movie--I don't know if it was the changes from the book (Anita Ekberg's character was a dark, troubled man in the book..) or the casting, but of course, she didn't like the Margaret Rutherford series either..go figure.  Although Randall isn't who I think of when I think of Poirot,  his comedic timing payed off here, and you know from the very start he intends to have fun with the role.  Not my favorite Christie, but entertaining..glad I finally got to see it.                                                                                                      bowling with Poirot Image result for the alphabet murders 1965

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Summer Interlude (1951)

Much of this early Ingmar Bergman film is an elaborate flashback of the event indicated in the title. An accomplished ballerina reflects on a love affair of her youth. They meet and soon are lovers (they both admit that up to this point they have never kissed another before but it doesn't take long before they're rolling in the hay) and we get nearly overkill sequences of hackneyed depictions of exhilerating young love : running on the beach, jumping into each other's arms, copious gropings, falling over each other with utter joy, endless kissing and hugging, excited expressions of mutual endearment ; it becomes withering after a while. Despite some light foreshadowing of something else to come, I began to see the movie as an apprentice effort by this great master as he improvises an innocuous love affair as a sheer movie making exercise.

The recollection is cut short by tragedy and the story returns to the present. Everything changes and bleakness replaces happiness. Dark personal imprisonment replaces innocence and freedom. The story moves to conclusion with some interesting new characters and some trenchant dialogue. I'm no expert on Bergman but intuitively I wouldn't be surprised if the second half of this early movie might just be some of his best stuff. This is almost two movies in one. The ending might surprise.

Notes: 1) In the flashback, she has an uncle who fits, categorically, the definition of slime in the sense of preying on young girls. He wants to be her "protector." A conversation seems to indicate that something sordid has passed between them. "I shouldn't have let you touch me," she says. Is this literal or figurative? The relationship between them is not developed. The decadence of the remark is jarring. 2) In a somewhat humorous vein, the young lover says to her, "I love you so much I want to eat you up." She says, "Where would you start?" "I would start with your brains and work down to between your thighs. I have a cannibal friend who told me about this." Yike!

And thirdly, there are some lovely ballet sequences that are beautifully weaved into the narrative, including an instance near the finale which is quite telling (and moving). There is a wonderful scene when he barges in on her as she practices. The camera is stationed on the floor showing close ups from  her knees to the floor as she fires away with some elaborate pyrotechnics of exquisite lower limb maneuvers of the art. Through this marvelous camera setting, he is visible across the room sitting in the background reproaching her for thinking more of her career than about him. The camera work there is inspired. This movie should be included in any discussion about ballet in cinema.

Certainly recommended and with an added caveat ; don't give up too early; do but hang awhile, it's worth it.

 

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18 hours ago, RosieSayer said:

Now I have to go watch [INDISCREET (1958)] again. It has been too long. Both actors are magnificent, and like Ingrid's character, I, too, am crazy about hard currency. 

Love Bergman. Love Cary. Have come to love NOTORIOUS over time.

INDISCREET tho?

Notsomuch.

(It's a filmed stage play that has not aged well.)

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Hell’s Hinges (1916)

Solid William S. Hart western, in which he plays a borderline bad guy reformed by a preacher’s sister. The idea does sound corny but the darn thing works.

A young minister (Jack Standing) and his sister (Clara Williams) arrive in a wide-open town which is nicknamed “Hell’s Hinges.” The town villain (Alfred Hollingsworth), who, of course, runs the saloon, decides he is going to run the minister out of town. Hart wants nothing to do with religion, so he is on board with the plan … until he meets Williams.

Eventually, Hollingsworth engages the town “ho” (Louise Glaum) to get the minister drunk, which gives the townspeople license to burn down the church. In one of the better climaxes of any western, Hart angrily but methodically gets revenge. In one very powerful scene, he stands calmly outside the saloon as it is burning behind him. A complete town (35 buildings, in this case) was built at Inceville, the studio owned by producer Thomas Ince. It was burned to the ground during the climax. Some newspapers reported that several extras were injured during the fire.

The film has some historical significance as it features the first screen appearance of John Gilbert, who can be spotted in a few scenes. Supposedly Hart was so impressed with Gilbert that he signed him for another western.

There is a good print on youtube, and the film runs just over an hour.

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11 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Love Bergman. Love Cary. Have come to love NOTORIOUS over time.

INDISCREET tho?

Notsomuch.

(It's a filmed stage play that has not aged well.)

I enjoy Indiscreet , especially when Bergman frustratedly cries out "On my Knees !!" :lol: . You just know she's going to try and get him back for that.

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11 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Love Bergman. Love Cary. Have come to love NOTORIOUS over time.

INDISCREET tho?

Notsomuch.

(It's a filmed stage play that has not aged well.)

I used to be lukewarm about Indiscreet but I'm more of a fan now.    Yea,  the plot doesn't offer much but the charm of the two stars makes this film.   Something about how Bergman carries herself in this film really gets to me.    

This is a good example of style over substance.    (and this is from a jazz musician,  where we laugh at blues players because all they have is style and little to no substance!).    

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1 hour ago, scsu1975 said:

Hell’s Hinges (1916)

 

Solid William S. Hart western, in which he plays a borderline bad guy reformed by a preacher’s sister. The idea does sound corny but the darn thing works.

 

That story description is not far off that for Angel and the Badman (1946).

This is William S. Hart's farewell address to movie audiences prior to his retirement, originally accompanying a re-issue of his last final, Tumbleweeds. I find him to be quite moving in his final three or four minutes here, a gentleman from an earlier time, hat in his hand, speaking of the glory of his movie making days at their peak but sadly bidding adieu. He would never step before a camera again.

 

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Roman J. Israel, Esq. (2017) - Muddled legal drama/character study from Columbia Pictures and writer-director Dan Gilroy. Denzel Washington stars as the title attorney, a man with a brilliant legal mind but with a borderline autistic personality. He's spent the past several decades as one half of a two-man law firm, with the other partner doing all of the case arguments in court while Roman drafts the legal briefs and motions at the office. When his partner suffers a debilitating heart attack, Roman is thrust back into courtrooms, and is soon looking for work. Will he stick to his principles or will he sell them out for good money and material pleasures? Also featuring Colin Farrell, Carmen Ejogo, Lynda Gravatt, Tony Plana, Amanda Warren, Hugo Armstrong, Sam Gilroy, and Amari Cheatom.

Gilroy seems to have a lot to say about the current state of the US justice system, with its assembly line plea bargaining and privatized incarceration, but he's not sure how to say it. Israel represents a kind of forgotten civil rights radical approach to social justice that's become unfashionable and looked down upon, and Gilroy seems to be calling for a return to such idealism, but Israel's story arc doesn't exactly make that return look appealing. It's easy to see why Washington took the part, as it's showy and has lots of little (and a few big) kinks and bits of business to play around with. He gets to sport a bad haircut, and wear ill-fitting suits and overly-large eyeglasses, even going so far as to have caps removed from his front teeth to reveal a large gap. Much like Gilroy's script, though, Israel isn't always clear on what he means when he says it, and the message gets lost to pseudo-profundity and moral posturing. This movie underwent a substantial re-edit after it's film festival premiere, supposedly changing the tone and pacing quite a bit. I'd be curious what that cut was like. As for this one, it's a disappointment, and while Washington seems incapable of a bad performance, for this one to earn an Oscar nomination is a head-scratcher, even in a year with few choices.  (6/10)

Source: Sony Blu-ray.

denzel-washington-roman-j-israel-esq.jpg

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10 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Roman J. Israel, Esq. (2017) - Muddled legal drama/character study from Columbia Pictures and writer-director Dan Gilroy. Denzel Washington stars as the title attorney, a man with a brilliant legal mind but with a borderline autistic personality. He's spent the past several decades as one half of a two-man law firm, with the other partner doing all of the case arguments in court while Roman drafts the legal briefs and motions at the office. When his partner suffers a debilitating heart attack, Roman is thrust back into courtrooms, and is soon looking for work. Will he stick to his principles or will he sell them out for good money and material pleasures? Also featuring Colin Farrell, Carmen Ejogo, Lynda Gravatt, Tony Plana, Amanda Warren, Hugo Armstrong, Sam Gilroy, and Amari Cheatom.

Gilroy seems to have a lot to say about the current state of the US justice system, with its assembly line plea bargaining and privatized incarceration, but he's not sure how to say it. Israel represents a kind of forgotten civil rights radical approach to social justice that's become unfashionable and looked down upon, and Gilroy seems to be calling for a return to such idealism, but Israel's story arc doesn't exactly make that return look appealing. It's easy to see why Washington took the part, as it's showy and has lots of little (and a few big) kinks and bits of business to play around with. He gets to sport a bad haircut, and wear ill-fitting suits and overly-large eyeglasses, even going so far as to have caps removed from his front teeth to reveal a large gap. Much like Gilroy's script, though, Israel isn't always clear on what he means when he says it, and the message gets lost to pseudo-profundity and moral posturing. This movie underwent a substantial re-edit after it's film festival premiere, supposedly changing the tone and pacing quite a bit. I'd be curious what that cut was like. As for this one, it's a disappointment, and while Washington seems incapable of a bad performance, for this one to earn an Oscar nomination is a head-scratcher, even in a year with few choices.  (6/10)

Source: Sony Blu-ray.

denzel-washington-roman-j-israel-esq.jpg

I have to agree, if the sexual accusations against James Franco hadn't come out, he would undoubtably have gotten Washington's slot.

As great as Denzel usually is, this is not a performance I would have given him a nomination for. I hate saying that because he rarely disappoints me. But then the movie itself just didn't engross me.

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If I Had My Way (1940) - Bland musical from Universal and director David Butler. Construction workers Buzz (Bing Crosby), Axel (El Brendel), and Fred (Donald Woods) are best friends as well as co-workers. Buzz and Axel are also surrogate fathers to Fred's young daughter Patricia (Gloria Jean). When Fred is killed in an accident, Buzz and Axel are charged with taking Patricia to New York City to live with relatives, where they all get tied up in running a money-pit restaurant. Also featuring Charles Winninger, Allyn Joslyn, Claire Dodd, Moroni Olsen, Nana Bryant, Rod Cameron, Blanche Ring, and Eddie Leonard.

I was unaware of Gloria Jean, an operatic singer who Universal groomed to be a replacement for the aging Deanna Durbin. Jean was a popular film star from 1939 through the war years, but this is first time I've seen her. She comes across nice enough, but her style isn't my cup of tea. If juvenile opera singers are your thing, you may like her more. Bing wanders through the movie and cashes his check. El Brendel does his El Brendel thing. The whole enterprise was almost completely forgettable until the big multi-artist musical numbers at the end, yet another nostalgic look at yesterday's performers, including an embarrassing and awful blackface minstrel number, this time from Eddie Leonard as himself. The good old days, indeed. <_<   (5/10)

Source: Universal DVD, part of the Bing Crosby Screen Legend Collection.

if-i-had-my-way-movie-poster-1940-102045

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